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Overuse of the term "backside"

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Is this a pet peeve of anybody else? The recent activity on the Vail vs. Whistler thread, with references to the Squaw "Backside" reminded me of this. (And Squaw may not be the best example, as references to Squaw's "backside" exist on the website, despite that thread being the first time I have EVER heard reference to such).

 

To me, calling something the "backside" of a ski area means crossing a ridgeline. Back bowls at Vail, for example. Montezuma Bowl at A-Basin.  Failing crossing a ridgeline, at least skiing a different aspect than the rest of the base area.  At one point the runs off of the Sunnyside lift at Winter Park were referred to as "Mary Jane's Backside," and obviously that name has as much to do with the double entendre as much as anything to do with the traditional use of the term.

 

What I don't get is that I am starting to hear "backside" for basically anything that doesn't funnel into an improved base area. Reference to Wolf Creek's "backside" are popping up by a specific type of visitor, referring to the Alberta area.  This despite all of Wolf Creek ski area being in the same overall drainage/valley, etc.

 

Does your ski area have a "backside?" Is the term used in a way that makes sense? Does the ski area officially use the term?

post #2 of 20

Wouldn't the back...part of squaw such as shirley, solitude, granite chief, and silverado be truly backside by that definition?

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterneRouge View Post
 

Wouldn't the back...part of squaw such as shirley, solitude, granite chief, and silverado be truly backside by that definition?

It would appear so. In that case I find it interesting that the ski area refers to it as such ( on their website), but it is not in the vernacular. As I said, it is probably a poor example, but it reminded me of my peeve because when it was used in that thread, my first thought was "where?" Just like the first time I heard "backside" used in reference to Wolf Creek (I thought they were actually talking about crossing the ridge into VERY isolated country), or several other places (Eldora comes to mind).

 

It just seems almost anywhere, people are looking for an excuse to call something the "backside," probably because they think it sounds cool or adventurous. Sometimes this is ski areas, something this is people, it just doesn't seem to fit in a lot of cases.

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Is this a pet peeve of anybody else? The recent activity on the Vail vs. Whistler thread, with references to the Squaw "Backside" reminded me of this. (And Squaw may not be the best example, as references to Squaw's "backside" exist on the website, despite that thread being the first time I have EVER heard reference to such).

 

Me too - and it's my home mountain!  Haha.  It really makes no sense because it's not the back-side at all, really just off to the side.  Most of the aspects are the same as other portions of the so-called front-side.

 

There's a good chance this was simply the doing of a web developer, who just matched the name like the backside of Alpine Meadows, which actually is a backside.

 

UPDATE: I just checked a trail map from a few years ago and it is not called the backside.

post #5 of 20

I also approve of the picking of this nit.  If we're taking about terrain on the same face of the mountain but farther back than the main trails I'd call that "high country".  Back side is on the other side of the summit.

post #6 of 20

At Stevens Pass there is a real back side that people call the "Backside," which is the Mill Creek drainage and which has no access to a lodge or parking area.  At Mt. Baker there are slopes on three sides of two different hills but none is called the backside, probably because you can ski directly to a lodge from any of these faces.   

post #7 of 20
backside = arse, or as you might call it, "ass". Then again, what you call "fanny" is completely wrong...
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

 

Me too - and it's my home mountain!  Haha.  It really makes no sense because it's not the back-side at all, really just off to the side.  Most of the aspects are the same as other portions of the so-called front-side.

 

There's a good chance this was simply the doing of a web developer, who just matched the name like the backside of Alpine Meadows, which actually is a backside.

 

UPDATE: I just checked a trail map from a few years ago and it is not called the backside.

 

In recent years, DMR has started calling everything that doesn't funnel into the base the "backside."  It first shows in a trail map in 2009.  This despite the entire ski area being located on one ridge and the delineation between the front and "backside" being a small glacial moraine jutting out from the valley floor aways.

 

Most of the terrain is on the "backside."  More evidence in my eyes that certain people are really enamored with the marketing possibilities in using the term.

 

Trail map for reference.

 

post #9 of 20
Our back side is the other side of the mountain. Some call it the "north side", which is confusing to me because North Bowl is on the front side of the mountain. So, "back side" is accurate here and no more or less accurate than "north side". But it's easier to say back side as then you're not looking for a compass...
post #10 of 20

At Alpine Meadows the backside is definitely ass right now. (Can I say that?)

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

It would appear so. In that case I find it interesting that the ski area refers to it as such ( on their website), but it is not in the vernacular. As I said, it is probably a poor example, but it reminded me of my peeve because when it was used in that thread, my first thought was "where?" Just like the first time I heard "backside" used in reference to Wolf Creek (I thought they were actually talking about crossing the ridge into VERY isolated country), or several other places (Eldora comes to mind).

 

It just seems almost anywhere, people are looking for an excuse to call something the "backside," probably because they think it sounds cool or adventurous. Sometimes this is ski areas, something this is people, it just doesn't seem to fit in a lot of cases.

Then give another example of poor usage other then Wolf Creek, which in my opinion fits but actual isn't really the same drainage as you stated. 

 

I honestly can't think of any ski area that refers to an area of their mountain as a "back-side" that actually isn't. 

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post

backside = arse, or as you might call it, "ass". 

 

On Epicfly.com there's probably 18 dozen threads on how it's only appropriate to call it a backside if you buzz up and over the head.   Or shoulders at least. 

If you merely side-fly a fatty protuberance that sticks out from the waistband, and wish to reference everything that doesn't funnel to the front, you should call it 'high country'.

 

 

Other threads

 

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  • First time using sponging mouth parts, running into problems (5pages)
  • Left siders - Magic Zit!  Have you been?   Planning on going???
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  • Most vertical in a day
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Edited by cantunamunch - 1/23/15 at 10:07pm
post #13 of 20

Killington has some sweet back bowls. 

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

On Epicfly.com there's probably 18 dozen threads on how it's only appropriate to call it a backside if you buzz up and over the head.   Or shoulders at least. 

If you merely side-fly a fatty protuberance that sticks out from the waistband, and wish to reference everything that doesn't funnel to the front, you should call it 'high country'.

 

 

Other threads

 

  • Help me overcome my (irrational) fear of sweat drops (3 pages)
  • First time using sponging mouth parts, running into problems (5pages)
  • Left siders - Magic Zit!  Have you been?   Planning on going???
  • Armour issues MASSIVE Meat recall 
  • Most vertical in a day
  • Where would you go if you had 5 days to lay eggs?

 

I love that the "Most vertical in a day" title doesn't have to change.... 

post #15 of 20
My backside is out of bounds!
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

My backside is out of bounds!

 

Even to fly patrol...

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Even to fly patrol...

Well, there was that one time at ski camp.
post #18 of 20

Backside of Squaw?  (Julia Mancuso)

 

post #19 of 20
I'd like to hit Squaw's backside!
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

In recent years, DMR has started calling everything that doesn't funnel into the base the "backside."  It first shows in a trail map in 2009.  This despite the entire ski area being located on one ridge and the delineation between the front and "backside" being a small glacial moraine jutting out from the valley floor aways.

 

Most of the terrain is on the "backside."  More evidence in my eyes that certain people are really enamored with the marketing possibilities in using the term.

 

Trail map for reference.

 

 

When I saw this thread I instantly thought of Purg haha.


Edited by core2 - 1/24/15 at 5:58pm
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