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Another day, another MA - Page 2

post #31 of 37

^^ I just laughed pretty hard at that.  WOW.  You have to submit that to the Jerry of the Day Instagram feed.

post #32 of 37
Thread Starter 
JASP,

Thanks for your feedback. A short, little background on me. I've been a "part time skier" most of my life 15-20 days a season. I've been trying to ski "full time" since 2011-2012, aiming for 50 days.

From 1-10 in terms of aggression, I'd say I was a 6 before, I'm trying to ski more aggressively now that I get out at least once a week, to a 7-8

Aggressively meaning skiing steep terrain without making slow turns, stopping as much, linking turns together faster, etc. I may be completely taking this the wrong way if my technique sucked to begin with, I'm not sure as I've had very few lessons.


I'm not quite sure what you mean by upward deflection of my torso as I move across terrain. I generally try to keep my shoulders pointed downhill and only move my legs.

The conditions in the first video were just average. Chalky bumps, and the snow in between bumps was a little slick, but def not icy.

Once again thanks for your feedback
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post

JASP,

Thanks for your feedback. A short, little background on me. I've been a "part time skier" most of my life 15-20 days a season. I've been trying to ski "full time" since 2011-2012, aiming for 50 days.

From 1-10 in terms of aggression, I'd say I was a 6 before, I'm trying to ski more aggressively now that I get out at least once a week, to a 7-8

Aggressively meaning skiing steep terrain without making slow turns, stopping as much, linking turns together faster, etc. I may be completely taking this the wrong way if my technique sucked to begin with, I'm not sure as I've had very few lessons.


I'm not quite sure what you mean by upward deflection of my torso as I move across terrain. I generally try to keep my shoulders pointed downhill and only move my legs.

The conditions in the first video were just average. Chalky bumps, and the snow in between bumps was a little slick, but def not icy.

Once again thanks for your feedback

 

My apology for the sarcasm/humor I posted.  As anyone who has been on Epic for awhile knows that I am 99% a positive member. Can't really explain why this struck me as odd.  Good luck with your skiing.

post #34 of 37
Imagine enough range of vertical motion in your body so your head and shoulders do not bob up at the bump crest and then sink down as you extend into the trough. The more equal the pressure throughout the turns the easier the bumps become.
post #35 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

I totally agree with you skiNI!  I personally extend into the mogul or off of the mogul sidewall, I don't retract into it, I retract after I turn into it or deflect off of it.

Retracting as you first hit the bump at the bottom of the rut sets you up for a pivot/skid.  If you want to perfect the pivot/skid down the zipperline, then follow tball's advice, it is a very solid technique to use down the zipperline, especially when the terrain gets steeper.

The question really is, where do you want to take your skiing?  You are actually getting down Pali comfortably, sure there is room to improve.  It's up to you to determine "what" you want to improve and "how" you want to ski.

From what I see, you are stuck in limbo, 1/2 way between using the deflected carve turn ( extending into the turn finish,  approx. 18" up from the bottom of the rut deflecting off the mogul sidewall) and the pivot/skid (sliding down to the bottom of the rut and hitting the bump sideways with the toe piece of your binding)

Take a look at this video to see a side by side example of both techniques.




It's up to you, how do you want to ski?  retract into the bump or extend off of the mogul sidewall.

Nail

Was following this thread from tapa talk and didn't actually see this video until now. The technique on the left side looks like it's very hard on the knees. Also, is there a technique that works better in deep bumps? I think I mentioned earlier in this thread that mine dump at copper really killed me, that trail was pretty much all 3 ft+ bumps.

Where I want to go with my bumps is consistent zipperline. I'd say right now I can handle 10-20 bumps before losing form (or what I call form smile.gif )
post #36 of 37
In that latest video Did you notice the quiet head and shoulders? Far less vertical head bobbing than we see in your video. Perhaps your future includes more range of motion that would produce similar results. It certainly requires more knee and hip flexing and extending.
post #37 of 37
Quote:

skiNE wrote:

Where I want to go with my bumps is consistent zipperline.

 

You are correct, the skier on the right is skiing a much smoother path down the zipperline, it is very high level skiing as his ski shovels take the majority of the impact of the bump.  This is a very fast line with limited speed control in steeper terrain.

 

I think the #1 component hurting you would be your skis, #2 would be your skiing skill set.

 

LurkingBear's comment on replacing those wide skis with something narrower would be the first thing to do.  I'd suggest a SOFT shoveled womens GS ski, maybe a 175 or 177, or possibly a ski like the Hart F17 (I'm not even sure they are still made).

 

Getting on a narrower ski won't be a magic bullet, but when you learn to turn them on the groomed, your skis won't be a roadblock holding you back in the moguls anyways and it's help you can buy$$.

 

Next you really need to learn how to develop early and consistent shovel edge pressure when making short turns.  Slider was spot on suggesting you learn how to retract into turn transition whether it's a pivot/skid or deflected carve turn.

 

I'd suggest you take those improved short turns and new skis and focus on deflecting off of the mogul sidewall in moderate pitch terrain, I'm afraid in steeper terrain you'll have to rely on the pivot/skid with impact as you hit the bottom of the bump to gain speed control.  As you improve, you'll be able to minimize some of the impact to gain speed control, but that reality is many, many days (seasons) out if you want to increase your speed.

 

Your choice to limit yourself to the zipperline severely limits your options to gain speed control in steeper terrain.

 

Best of luck and keep pushing yourself to improve.

 

Nail

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