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New goggles to replace ill-fitting Smith I/O

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Last year I got a new pair of Smith I/O goggles and I've come to the conclusion that they just don't fit my face properly. I think they're too small. The arch of the frame doesn't seem to go all the way around my face, so the goggles sit slightly in front of my nose rather than on it. So every time I exhale air gets into them and fogs them up.

 

Last time out I tried on a pair of I/OX goggles at the shop, which are slightly bigger and fit my face way better. While I can't try them before I buy them, they feel like they'd form a much better seal against my face (nose especially) and probably eliminate the fogging issue. I'm thinking about picking up a pair my next ski day.

 

I haven't done much research into other brands of goggles, so I'm curious about any competitors that could be as good as the I/OX for the same price or less. Essentially I'm looking for a large pair of goggles with a spherical, interchangeable lens. I do a lot of night skiing so swapping lenses from day to night is key. My local shop has a good selection of Anon, POC, and Electric goggles but the ones with spherical lenses don't come with a second lens like the Smiths do. I'll try on some others next time I'm there and go with what feels best, but so far the I/OX seems like a pretty sure bet.

post #2 of 18

I tried the Smith I/O and I/OX but neither fit my face.  I have the Oakley Airbrake which is a similar model: spherical lens, interchangeable on the slope. I often carry 2 lenses: one for glare and one for flat light (High Intensity Yellow).  I like them a lot and would recommend them. They are available in 2 fits: standard and Asian fit (extra padding around the bridge of the nose).

 

http://www.oakley.com/en/mens/goggles/snow-goggles/airbrake-snow/product/W0OO7037/?skuCode=OO7037-01

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackboy1 View Post
 

I tried the Smith I/O and I/OX but neither fit my face.  I have the Oakley Airbrake which is a similar model: spherical lens, interchangeable on the slope. I often carry 2 lenses: one for glare and one for flat light (High Intensity Yellow).  I like them a lot and would recommend them. They are available in 2 fits: standard and Asian fit (extra padding around the bridge of the nose).

 

http://www.oakley.com/en/mens/goggles/snow-goggles/airbrake-snow/product/W0OO7037/?skuCode=OO7037-01


Thanks for the tip, I'll check them out. Going by reviews they seem slightly smaller than the IOX but I can't tell for sure until I try them.

post #4 of 18

I'm similar to you.....I/O not quite big enough.  Ended up going with I/OX, very happy with them.  However, I also own the Anon M2.  Actually has a slightly bigger field of vision than the I/OX, but fits very similar to the I/OX.  The M2 sits closer to the face and doesn't protrude outward quite as much.  Easiest lens swap system on the market, and I think it comes with a light and dark lens (can't remember for sure, sorry).  Fit is excellent, take a look at the Anon M2 if you can.  Only gripes are lack of silicone beading on the strap, and tends to fog up a bit easier than the I/OX in extreme conditions.

post #5 of 18

For the people with the interchange goggles, can you enlighten me on is it really that much better than just getting 2pair?

 

Even if the change is quick and you don't fumble and smudge the lenses, you got to be carrying around a spare lens.  Is it that much savings over carrying around the 2nd pair of goggles.

post #6 of 18
If the goggle is $200 the lens is prob 60-90. But the 200$ goggle usually comes with two lenses.
You know the answer you want - just use two goggles. Plenty of people do. If you can fit it in your pocket.
post #7 of 18

Sorry, I meant to say "benefit" instead of "savings".  So I meant the benefit of saving space, or saving time; or any other benefit.  Want to know your reasons why you picked them.

 

For price, I wasn't specifically thinking about that, but would be interested if that was your decision factor.

The non-interchange goggles are going to be a bit cheaper than the interchange goggles, So getting 2x "normal" goggles versus 1x "interchange" may wash out a bit on the price.

 

No right or wrong, just want to hear and understand people's personal logic and if it really is the bees knees.

post #8 of 18
I ski east so little need for dark goggles. So just one. Others disagree.

In fairly extensive past threads still going on, it appears people are in distinctly 2 camps. Those who find it much easier and better to carry 2 goggles and those who change on the go. First thing is do you have room in coat for a pair? Then there's carrying the extra lens. Need a case. At that point maybe just carry another whole goggle? Check out Scott LCG goggle. Comes with nifty lens case.
Also goggles are getting huge so carrying 2 may be tougher.
post #9 of 18

I have the Anon M2 goggles, that I have had out a couple of times now. They're spherical, and DO come with a second (very lightly tinted) lens. The change system is magnetic and really couldn't be easier. 

 

I got them mainly because there were times I wished I could swap to a lighter lens, and didn't want to have to buy two pair. 

 

So far I've really liked them... though I haven't done the evening skiing I have in the past, so I haven't actually used the second lens (yet).

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post

I have the Anon M2 goggles, that I have had out a couple of times now. They're spherical, and DO come with a second (very lightly tinted) lens. The change system is magnetic and really couldn't be easier. 

I got them mainly because there were times I wished I could swap to a lighter lens, and didn't want to have to buy two pair. 

So far I've really liked them... though I haven't done the evening skiing I have in the past, so I haven't actually used the second lens (yet).
The question is will you carry the extra lens with you? At Vail you will need a dark tint most likely.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


The question is will you carry the extra lens with you? At Vail you will need a dark tint most likely.

 

Yeah, I mainly wanted the lighter lens for evening/night/dark overcast days here in the east. So I have it in my bag here (usually in a locker). I realize I'll probably only need the darker lens at Vail.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

The question is will you carry the extra lens with you? At Vail you will need a dark tint most likely.

Yeah, I mainly wanted the lighter lens for evening/night/dark overcast days here in the east. So I have it in my bag here (usually in a locker). I realize I'll probably only need the darker lens at Vail.
They have clouds and it snows in the day too sometimes. So... Be prepared.
post #13 of 18

I like the interchangeable lens option, but I generally pick a lens for the day and stick with it. I never carry a spare lens.

post #14 of 18

Because I am lazy about the lens changing, I just bought a pair of photochromic goggles. Zeal has the ones with GPS on sale for $200.

post #15 of 18

1. Since it sounds as if you have a gap in front of your nose where air enters, you might want to check out "Asian fit" also known as "alternative fit" goggles that have extra foam over the nose. Both Oakley and Smith have this option.

 

2. A home remedy would be to get some foam insulation from the hardware store and apply it to your current goggles. Similar to this: http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1339888

 

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your input everyone. I like the interchangeable option because it takes up less room. But if I could get two $100 pairs that would give me the same quality as a single $200 pair with interchangeable lenses I'd consider it. Any suggestions?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
 

1. Since it sounds as if you have a gap in front of your nose where air enters, you might want to check out "Asian fit" also known as "alternative fit" goggles that have extra foam over the nose. Both Oakley and Smith have this option.

 

2. A home remedy would be to get some foam insulation from the hardware store and apply it to your current goggles. Similar to this: http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1339888

 

I've heard of that solution before but I really think that a new pair that fits properly from the start is what I need. The goggles I have sit more on top of my face rather than around it. I don't have an Asian-style nose, I just have a big head :)

post #17 of 18
Try them on with your helmet. Make sure the air vents aren't blocked. Search for goggle threads.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post

 

So far I've really liked them... though I haven't done the evening skiing I have in the past, so I haven't actually used the second lens (yet).

 

Quick update... out this morning, heavy overcast and fog made them have the lights on on the slopes, and I got my first use of the low light lens (named Blue Lagoon by Anon). I really liked it... it's a yellow-ish lens but a more subtle color than others I've seen, and did a good job with showing some texture in the overcast. 

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