or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › How do I choose a binding?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do I choose a binding?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I'm narrowing in on the skis I'd like to buy (looks like Blizzard Latigo), now I'm thinking about bindings.  The last time I bought skis was at least 10 years ago, and there was no choice to make on the bindings, as they were not flat skis and I had to get the bindings that went with them.

 

I'm around 5'9", 200 lbs.  I'm going with a ski length of 170cm because I'll happily sacrifice stability / speed when carving for the ability to make faster turns in the bumps.  I got new boots a couple of years ago and my feet are very happy with them.

 

Though I'm almost 50, I'm still a fairly aggressive skier.  I live in the Syracuse, NY area and ski regularly at the small places around here.  We usually take one trip out west each year.  Heading to Salt Lake City in a few weeks and will ski some combination of Snowbird, Alta and Solitude.  I love a nice single black diamond bump run at any of those places.  I like to play around through the trees.  Powder is fun, but I don't get a whole lot of practice on it at home, so it is not a priority.  I'll ski the groomers to get to where I want to go in the morning and at the end of the day when my legs have had enough.

 

Other than making sure that the din setting goes high enough (12 or 13 for me?) what else should I be looking for in a binding?  I assume safety-wise they all have to be about the same to keep the lawyers at bay.  I can see durability being a concern with the type of skiing I like to do.   I see that a lot of folks like the Marker bindings (Griffin / Jester), so maybe I should just pick one of those and fork over the $$, but I thought I'd at least ask the questions.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 7

Lateral rigidity and a tight interface is what I look for in a binding. Look Pivots/Rossi FKS are a great option for a laterally rigid binding, these have a short mount distance and a low swing weight making a very positive interface. The Salomon Sth2 13 is one of my other favorites, with it's single pivot toe and a long travel heel. These two designs go back to the last time you purchased bindings so they should be familiar to you. 

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sccarnic View Post
 

I'm narrowing in on the skis I'd like to buy (looks like Blizzard Latigo), now I'm thinking about bindings.  The last time I bought skis was at least 10 years ago, and there was no choice to make on the bindings, as they were not flat skis and I had to get the bindings that went with them.

 

I'm around 5'9", 200 lbs.  I'm going with a ski length of 170cm because I'll happily sacrifice stability / speed when carving for the ability to make faster turns in the bumps.  I got new boots a couple of years ago and my feet are very happy with them.

 

Though I'm almost 50, I'm still a fairly aggressive skier.  I live in the Syracuse, NY area and ski regularly at the small places around here.  We usually take one trip out west each year.  Heading to Salt Lake City in a few weeks and will ski some combination of Snowbird, Alta and Solitude.  I love a nice single black diamond bump run at any of those places.  I like to play around through the trees.  Powder is fun, but I don't get a whole lot of practice on it at home, so it is not a priority.  I'll ski the groomers to get to where I want to go in the morning and at the end of the day when my legs have had enough.

 

Other than making sure that the din setting goes high enough (12 or 13 for me?) what else should I be looking for in a binding?  I assume safety-wise they all have to be about the same to keep the lawyers at bay.  I can see durability being a concern with the type of skiing I like to do.   I see that a lot of folks like the Marker bindings (Griffin / Jester), so maybe I should just pick one of those and fork over the $$, but I thought I'd at least ask the questions.

 

Thanks

12 or 13 DIN sounds awfully high--why don't you google a DIN chart and work it out. That said a lot of people like higher DIN bindings than they need because they are often more durable--metal parts instead of some of the plastic.

post #4 of 7

I doubt you need a DIN higher than 9, especially if you are willing to sacrifice speed for maneuverability, so any binding that tops out at 12 will be fine, 14 DIN models tend to be more robust construction and there are some theoretical advantages to having more unused spring compression. Would second the votes for Looks/Rossi's. The elasticity and rigidity mean you can go with a slightly lower setting, always a good thing. 

post #5 of 7

You will be about an 8 din. 12 is plenty.  A reason to avoid being too close to the din limit, is that over time and a  lot of abuse, an 8 now may become a 9.5 on a binding test.  Having a couple of points leeway is nice.

post #6 of 7
I think DIN standards allow adjustment up or down 2 visual indicator levels before the binding fails a torque test, so you want a binding that will allow that as the person above mentioned.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

I think I misunderstood some earlier advice on a different thread.  When someone recommended 12 or 13 they must have been recommending a binding that went up that high.  I will be having whatever shop mounts my bindings take care of the setting.

 

Thanks for the responses.  I think I will be looking at the Solomon STH2 13 or the Atomic equivalent, depending on which colors go better with my skis and boots :).

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › How do I choose a binding?