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really strong turning to my right but horrid turning to my left need desperate help

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone I need some help before I make my next outing (probably 9 or 10 months from now). 
Around Christmas time I got new boots (Vaccuum 10 if i am not mistaken), new skis/bindings (motive 86 ti with marker jester bindings). I have about 3 days of skiing on them. 
I consider myself intermediate. I am 6ft1in and about 250. 
My issue today is how I use only one side of my body (I am naturally left handed). When I go down the mountain I tend to carve going to the right (left foot is downhill ski), but can barely turn back to the left. I know as you advance the amount of carving you do determines how fast you go. What I do is stop hard on my right turns and on my left I just get across the slope to give me room on my right turns. 
I worked with a private instructor at jay peak and I said I was a beginner, when we got onto the mountain he was impressed how good my mechanics are and said I was doing everything right but I could improve (like always) in key areas. But, he never caught onto me only slowing up on my right turns until I mentioned it (we stayed on real easy slopes because he thought I was truly a beginner). in terms of me turning to my left I can not do it. He had me solely stopping on left turns... except when I got close I would immediately pick up and stop hard in front of him with my left ski down hill (like how hockey players stop hard)
I go to school in Oklahoma and I can not practice on the slopes while my friends are out there (in the last two yrs I might have 10 days they probably have close to twenty or more). I am comfortable on the blues in the NJ area while they are hitting diamonds and double diamonds. 
Need some help, maybe even exercises (yes I know I have to start exercising beyond my dominant feet) or tips
THANKS!

post #2 of 16
Everyone has a good side; as you get better the differences get smaller. Most of the time your good side is determined by your strong side, as you are left handed your left side is your strong side, and you will be more coordinated on that side as well. So pushing with your left leg turns you right, and you weak side your right leg needs work, you are not alone in this. Many people when new to skiing will hesitate to commit to a turn, especially on their weak side. Try not to hold back and hesitate on a turn, tell yourself that the ski will turn and have confidence in that.
As you can’t get up skiing much you could try jumping from one foot to another as a dry land excises. There is some cool ski excise equipment that a local gym may have. If I had a video of you skiing I could tell you more.
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Tombs View Post
 

Hello everyone I need some help before I make my next outing (probably 9 or 10 months from now). 
Around Christmas time I got new boots (Vaccuum 10 if i am not mistaken), new skis/bindings (motive 86 ti with marker jester bindings). I have about 3 days of skiing on them. 
I consider myself intermediate. I am 6ft1in and about 250. 
My issue today is how I use only one side of my body (I am naturally left handed). When I go down the mountain I tend to carve going to the right (left foot is downhill ski), but can barely turn back to the left. I know as you advance the amount of carving you do determines how fast you go. What I do is stop hard on my right turns and on my left I just get across the slope to give me room on my right turns. 
I worked with a private instructor at jay peak and I said I was a beginner, when we got onto the mountain he was impressed how good my mechanics are and said I was doing everything right but I could improve (like always) in key areas. But, he never caught onto me only slowing up on my right turns until I mentioned it (we stayed on real easy slopes because he thought I was truly a beginner). in terms of me turning to my left I can not do it. He had me solely stopping on left turns... except when I got close I would immediately pick up and stop hard in front of him with my left ski down hill (like how hockey players stop hard)
I go to school in Oklahoma and I can not practice on the slopes while my friends are out there (in the last two yrs I might have 10 days they probably have close to twenty or more). I am comfortable on the blues in the NJ area while they are hitting diamonds and double diamonds. 
Need some help, maybe even exercises (yes I know I have to start exercising beyond my dominant feet) or tips
THANKS!

Not an instructor but wanted to note that when learning fundamentals, some drills can only be learned and practiced on green runs.  I became an advanced skier about five years ago after starting to ski > 15 days per season, including trips out west.  My last lesson (a private in the Mid-Atlantic) we spent the last run on a long green (very, very flat) in order to work on a couple new drills related to balance and more subtle skills that will help on harder terrain in the long run.  Out west, when I have a private lesson (usually 3 hours), the first few runs are always on blue groomers before moving off-piste.

post #4 of 16

"jester bindings"  Here's your problem.  The court jesters job is to make fun of the lord of the manor.

 

Really it's difficult to learn skiing by watching Warren Miller movies while sitting in OK.  You need on snow time.  Thing get better with more mileage.

post #5 of 16

What you describe is pretty common for an intermediate range skier. I've seen plenty that make partial turns to their weak side, abort the turn, and then roll back on their strong side. It is especially hell to be attempting to pass these people as they appear to be turning away from you just to veer right back into your path.

 

A few things.

 

1. You are most likely not transferring weight to your weak ski.  Your weight stays on your strong inside ski, which can't get enough edge angle to make an effective turn.

2. Practice picking up the inside ski when initiating turns on the weak side to make sure you are transferring weight.  You can't weight a ski that is in the air, so this will force you to get used to using that outside ski.

 

3. If you find you just cannot smoothly transition into that weak side turn, go to a bootfitter and have your boot cant checked out. If you are skiing knock-kneed, it is really difficult to get on the outside edges.  Once you are on the outside edge by contorting your legs, it is doubly hard to transition back to the other skis. I've seen plenty of people, including my wife, who adapt to this by essentially skiing one-legged- the ski that determines the arc of the turn is the ski on the dominant leg, and the other ski is just along as an outrigger for balance.  This isn't good, but is a common adaptation to this issue.

 

Read here for more on canting. I've not sure I agree with the guy's solution of adding crap to the cuff area instead of changing the cant angle in the boot or bindings, but the pictures and text do a great job of explaining the issue.

 

http://www.skibootalignment.com/page8.html

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank you for these tips, maybe i can get my ice skates shipped to OK and practice my weak side stopping (I am the exact same way on ice skates)
Also, I am going to try and modify some suggestions into dry land practice (and use the ones suggested).
One the slope with the instructor he had to tell me to stay into my left turns (as my arms were flailing all about). We worked on it for 20 minutes haha.
I am not knock kneed and feel I have always just favored one side and have become weak on the other and never corrected it since I was good enough of a skater for open skate nights to screw around with friends.
In terms of using green runs to practice, it is hard due to peer pressure because they want to do more difficult things where I want to work on fundamentals and being with friends take precedence over learning fundamentals when you only have 2 weeks with them in the ski season (and only ski 2 or 3 days). I have to go out alone or with a newer skiier so I can practice on the same runs they do.

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Tombs View Post
 

Hello everyone I need some help before I make my next outing (probably 9 or 10 months from now). 
Around Christmas time I got new boots (Vaccuum 10 if i am not mistaken), new skis/bindings (motive 86 ti with marker jester bindings). I have about 3 days of skiing on them. 
I consider myself intermediate. I am 6ft1in and about 250. 
My issue today is how I use only one side of my body (I am naturally left handed). When I go down the mountain I tend to carve going to the right (left foot is downhill ski), but can barely turn back to the left. I know as you advance the amount of carving you do determines how fast you go. What I do is stop hard on my right turns and on my left I just get across the slope to give me room on my right turns. 
I worked with a private instructor at jay peak and I said I was a beginner, when we got onto the mountain he was impressed how good my mechanics are and said I was doing everything right but I could improve (like always) in key areas. But, he never caught onto me only slowing up on my right turns until I mentioned it (we stayed on real easy slopes because he thought I was truly a beginner). in terms of me turning to my left I can not do it. He had me solely stopping on left turns... except when I got close I would immediately pick up and stop hard in front of him with my left ski down hill (like how hockey players stop hard)
I go to school in Oklahoma and I can not practice on the slopes while my friends are out there (in the last two yrs I might have 10 days they probably have close to twenty or more). I am comfortable on the blues in the NJ area while they are hitting diamonds and double diamonds. 
Need some help, maybe even exercises (yes I know I have to start exercising beyond my dominant feet) or tips
THANKS!


It could be a case of one eye having better vision then the other causing you to favor a side

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

 

3. If you find you just cannot smoothly transition into that weak side turn, go to a bootfitter and have your boot cant checked out. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Tombs View Post
 

Around Christmas time I got new boots (Vaccuum 10 if i am not mistaken),
 

 

As anachronism said - get your boots alignment check out. That's where the easy money is. 

 

That said - your new Fischer Vac are heat molded so that should take care of boot fit, forward lean, cuff alignment and cant all at the same time. That is if the shop did it right. I have seen quite a few screw up heat moldings that have to done over - usually by another shop. So go and get the alignment checked - shouldn't cost anything. If it's OK then you have more work ahead of you but at least you are working from a solid foundation.   

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

As anachronism said - get your boots alignment check out. That's where the easy money is. 

 

That said - your new Fischer Vac are heat molded so that should take care of boot fit, forward lean, cuff alignment and cant all at the same time. That is if the shop did it right. I have seen quite a few screw up heat moldings that have to done over - usually by another shop. So go and get the alignment checked - shouldn't cost anything. If it's OK then you have more work ahead of you but at least you are working from a solid foundation.   

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

As anachronism said - get your boots alignment check out. That's where the easy money is. 

 

That said - your new Fischer Vac are heat molded so that should take care of boot fit, forward lean, cuff alignment and cant all at the same time. That is if the shop did it right. I have seen quite a few screw up heat moldings that have to done over - usually by another shop. So go and get the alignment checked - shouldn't cost anything. If it's OK then you have more work ahead of you but at least you are working from a solid foundation.   

 

I have been back twice to the boot fitter (after heat molding)... one time to get a met pad put in. The balls of my feet were on fire in 20 minutes on the mountain. Solved that one. But numbness in the toes still existed. So I went back again and I wore the boots for 20 minutes in the store and took my boot and sock off and there is a sole red mark right where my vein goes to my toes (on top of my foot). IF I press right where that mark is on a normal day I get a slight tingle. So, they cut the tongue a little (if I remember correctly) and have not been on the slopes since (I also have custom foot beds)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattT View Post
 


It could be a case of one eye having better vision then the other causing you to favor a side

... i have an astigmatism in my left eye if im not mistaken... 

post #10 of 16

I missed the vacuum boots part. In THEORY, they are supposed to take care of canting, however, I don't know whether they do it more or less automatically in the fit stage or whether the fitter needs to take an additional step to address a canting issue. Hopefully somebody more knowledgeable can chime in.

 

With traditional boots, even with most experienced fitters, they won't go looking for a canting problem unless it is quite obvious during the fitting process. In many cases, you need to specifically ask to get measured and corrected, if need be.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Tombs View Post
 
I have been back twice to the boot fitter (after heat molding)... one time to get a met pad put in. The balls of my feet were on fire in 20 minutes on the mountain. Solved that one. But numbness in the toes still existed. So I went back again and I wore the boots for 20 minutes in the store and took my boot and sock off and there is a sole red mark right where my vein goes to my toes (on top of my foot). IF I press right where that mark is on a normal day I get a slight tingle. So, they cut the tongue a little (if I remember correctly) and have not been on the slopes since (I also have custom foot beds)
 

 

Sounds like they did not do a good job. The heat molding supposed to take care of almost all the fit issues but it's not fool proof (fool being the shop). They are suppose to examine your foot and pad out any problem areas. prior to the molding process. It still take an experienced eye. If you are having several issue right from the get go I don't think they got it right. All the stuff that is being retrofitted to your boots is what was done prior to the heat molding process. Not all shops are created equal. 

 

BTW, did you know you were molded on a new two section molding machine or the older one section machine?    

 

Anyway, all the stuff you describe pertains to the fit and not alignment. Have them do an alignment check for you. 

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

I missed the vacuum boots part. In THEORY, they are supposed to take care of canting, however, I don't know whether they do it more or less automatically in the fit stage or whether the fitter needs to take an additional step to address a canting issue. Hopefully somebody more knowledgeable can chime in.

 

With traditional boots, even with most experienced fitters, they won't go looking for a canting problem unless it is quite obvious during the fitting process. In many cases, you need to specifically ask to get measured and corrected, if need be.

 

The canting process is pretty much automatic. So long you are not way out of wack and the machine is set up correctly. I'm on my third pair of vac and I have watched quite a few being molded so I'm pretty familiar with the process and limitations. I used to plane my boot soles, but not after switching to the vacs.

 

To confirm everything is dead on, I usually get it check out on one of those blue plastic beer can thingie. :D But usually I can tell by just skiing the boot.  

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

Sounds like they did not do a good job. The heat molding supposed to take care of almost all the fit issues but it's not fool proof (fool being the shop). They are suppose to examine your foot and pad out any problem areas. prior to the molding process. It still take an experienced eye. If you are having several issue right from the get go I don't think they got it right. All the stuff that is being retrofitted to your boots is what was done prior to the heat molding process. Not all shops are created equal. 

 

BTW, did you know you were molded on a new two section molding machine or the older one section machine?    

 

Anyway, all the stuff you describe pertains to the fit and not alignment. Have them do an alignment check for you. 

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-e558p8_9nHE/TgVzFVob62I/AAAAAAAAAI0/6M8jgRhpiXg/s1600/DSC00815.JPG
This one looks identical to what I was in. And I felt they actually did do a pretty good job. I went in with an open mind and spent a total of 7 hours or so there. I read that a lot of times guys go back two or three times to get boots re worked (like I did). Everytime I went in they greeted me by name, and devoted more than enough time to my needs. They seemed very knowledgeable on fitting, the store has been around since '75 and I can not find one bad review on them (plus they are reccomended if you are in the NY/NJ/PA area almost everywhere).
What they did when vacuum fitting is, get out little spacers (not sure of the name, but foam pads in different shapes) and put them on my foot (they maybe put 4 or 5 on). Then slipped a stocking over my foot and the spacers and I went into the boot (man was that tight). But, I do feel the tongue pressure should have been taken care of in the vacuum fitting (maybe not so much the metarsals hurting).

Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

The canting process is pretty much automatic. So long you are not way out of wack and the machine is set up correctly. I'm on my third pair of vac and I have watched quite a few being molded so I'm pretty familiar with the process and limitations. I used to plane my boot soles, but not after switching to the vacs.

 

To confirm everything is dead on, I usually get it check out on one of those blue plastic beer can thingie. :D But usually I can tell by just skiing the boot.  

I am not that experienced to tell if I need canting or not. But, sadly I will not be in the area for a long time (potentially 6 months) so as of now any modifications are out. 
But, they never charged me a dime for fitting, vacuuming, metatarsal pain, numbness of toes. I did bring the 4 different guys I worked with (I also bought skis and bindings there) $10 gift certificates to Dunkin Donuts as a 'Thank You'.

PS- Each time in the store they felt great (would wear em a half hr), but when I got to the slopes they started to hurt in about a half hr to 45. 

Sadly they are a 45 minute drive each way (and 1 toll each way) and I have made about 5 trips so it is time consuming, but I feel they truly took care of me, cared about my experience as a skier. I could have went down the street to ski barn for fitting, but after going in there with a friend for his skis, I did not like the atmosphere. Much younger less experienced crowd with what seemed to be no old time guidance (unlike the mom and pop place I went)

post #14 of 16

The padding of the foot seems OK with the exception of missing toe cap. They probably used it. From the list of fit issue, sound like the fore foot area was molded with too much pressure. Happens a lot with the old machine. 

 

The rework is common in the first year of the vacs. Not so much now a day (Year 4). Now, it's pretty much one and done. Unless you are still growing like my son. He gets his remolded at the start of every season.    

 

The old and new machines look alike. The new one has more air hose coming out of it. Do you remember how many air hose do you have connected to your feet?

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

The padding of the foot seems OK with the exception of missing toe cap. They probably used it. From the list of fit issue, sound like the fore foot area was molded with too much pressure. Happens a lot with the old machine. 

 

The rework is common in the first year of the vacs. Not so much now a day (Year 4). Now, it's pretty much one and done. Unless you are still growing like my son. He gets his remolded at the start of every season.    

 

The old and new machines look alike. The new one has more air hose coming out of it. Do you remember how many air hose do you have connected to your feet?

i had a rubber cap that covered just my toes also
I should be done growing (havent had to really change shoe sizes in the last yr or maybe a bit more...i am 20)
i think it was one air hose per boot.
But there was a lot of pressure on the top of my foot, my whole foot was white and then a red mark right over the vein haha!

post #16 of 16
A way I check my boots is to hang a plum bob from the center of my knee and stand in a ski position, the plum bob should point to the center of your boot toe. The first thing a good instuctor should do is to check how you stand in your boots.
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