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Are new boots the next necessary step in fixing my ski problems

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey bootfitters!  I'm looking for another opinion on my situation--your feedback is wanted!

 

There's a lot to convey in this post, but I'll try to make it short as possible. I've had ongoing issues with my ski alignment(I'll describe below), and lots of you recommended I see an expert boot fitter.  I saw an epicski recommended boot fitter.  I have the new Full-Tilt Classic ski boots, that are made to look like the old Full tilts made by Raichley.  The bootfitter noticed that I did have an A-frame thing going on, so he canted my ski boots, which I've noticed makes it a lot easier for me to ski on flat terrain or straight ahead without an inside edge engaging.  Unfortunately, the issue holding an edge when I'm turning right (and pressuring my left inside edge) remain.

 

I updated my bootfitter about what's been going on.  He is not a fan of the Full Tilts I have (especially the tongue on them), because he said it limits what he can do with them in terms of adjusting them to fit my needs.   So he has proposed finding me a pair of boots that fit me better, and going from there.   He has also mentioned my body is slightly "twisted" to one way, and that he could make me footbeds to fix this--I currently own a pair of Harb ski footbeds.

 

Here's my question:  Is it really necessary for me to buy a new pair of ski boots in order to have a proper alignment and fix the problems with my skiing?  In the next paragraph I'll explain the specific problems that I want an alignment to address:

 

When I make right turns (pressure on inside left edge), my left ski can't hold an edge well.   This is likely in part because I favor my right side in general, and put significantly more weight on my right foot than my left foot when standing on even ground.  I notice if I try consciously to really push down on the left foot/ski edge, I can hold an edge, but it takes lots of conscious effort, something not possible on steeper terrain or inconsistent snow.   When I make a left turn (pressure on inside right edge), I am able to hold an edge fine BUT my legs are consistently farther apart (versus how they are with a right turn) and in a slight snowplow--not parallel (versus parallel with a right turn).  With regards to the snowplow, I notice this may be because my left leg is a bit lazy on the snow during left turns.  If I concentrate hard to bring my left foo closer and parallel to the left I can try to fix this problem--but again it is only possible in consistent snow on mellow terrain.

 

I wonder how much of the problems listed in the last paragraph are a consequence of improper alignment, and how much are a consequence of limitations of my body.  My left leg is shorter--a functional difference of 3/8th an inch.  Due to a congenital condition the entire left side of my body is less sensitive that my right side.  This means my left leg is weaker, and my balance on  my left side is not as good.

 

So what do you think?  Are new boots the way forward with my alignment work?  Or could I try to get a shim added to my boot now or something else?  My worst fear in this is that I'll end up with new boots, but have the exact same problems.   I really don't want to spend the money on new boots if it's not necessary.   If new boots are the ticket to fix the problems mentioned above, I'll do it. Im curious curious to get other perspectives and make sure a new boot investment is the best bet in terms of fixing the problems with my turns mentioned above!  

 

Thanks!

 

PS--check out this thread from last yr if you want to read more about this issue:

http://www.epicski.com/t/127868/weak-left-leg-cant-hold-an-edge#post_1735155

post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post
 

Hey bootfitters!  I'm looking for another opinion on my situation--your feedback is wanted!

 

 

I wonder how much of the problems listed in the last paragraph are a consequence of improper alignment, and how much are a consequence of limitations of my body.  My left leg is shorter--a functional difference of 3/8th an inch.  Due to a congenital condition the entire left side of my body is less sensitive that my right side.  This means my left leg is weaker, and my balance on  my left side is not as good.

 

 

 

 

Unable to tell if the fitter had made up for your leg length difference from your post----You would need to start there, then check for alignment issues.

 

If your calf muscles are of different circumference you would need to account for this also.

 

mike

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post
 

Unable to tell if the fitter had made up for your leg length difference from your post----You would need to start there, then check for alignment issues.

 

If your calf muscles are of different circumference you would need to account for this also.

 

mike

 

Thanks for your reply.  The boot fitter did not adjust for leg length difference--I think because he felt like he would want to get me in a better fitting/more customizable boot first.  Sounds like you're saying you disagree with this approach.  I should note the difference is there, but I don't currently wear lifts in my everyday shoes (even though lifts are helpful--I notice I "sway" when walking without them, and am clearly shorter when standing with weight on my left foot vs right foot.  With all that being said, you think leg length is the first thing to address?  Can this be addressed with a lift inside the boot?

 

My calf muscles are different circumferences, with my left calf being smaller.  This difference is clear when looking at the intuition liner for my left vs right calf, as they have been heat molded to my legs.  How else would this difference in calf circumference be accounted for?

 

Thanks!

Matt

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post
 

 

Thanks for your reply.  The boot fitter did not adjust for leg length difference--I think because he felt like he would want to get me in a better fitting/more customizable boot first.  Sounds like you're saying you disagree with this approach.  I should note the difference is there, but I don't currently wear lifts in my everyday shoes (even though lifts are helpful--I notice I "sway" when walking without them, and am clearly shorter when standing with weight on my left foot vs right foot.  With all that being said, you think leg length is the first thing to address?  Can this be addressed with a lift inside the boot?

 

My calf muscles are different circumferences, with my left calf being smaller.  This difference is clear when looking at the intuition liner for my left vs right calf, as they have been heat molded to my legs.  How else would this difference in calf circumference be accounted for?

 

Thanks!

Matt

The different calf sizes would cause your tibia's (lower leg) to be at different amounts of forward lean---this would affect your fore/aft balance and eliminate symmetry in your turns, symmetry is what you are looking for.  Add an appropriate thickness spoiler between the liner and shell to make up for the different amounts of lower leg forward lean.  By the way, what is the circumference of both your calf muscles at the top of the liner?

 

Find a fitter who can add a lifter to the short leg boot and cut the boot toe/heel lugs back to DIN Norm.

 

You need a alignment/balance expert to look at what is going on----sounds like your fitter isn't filling the bill. 

 

You might consider addressing the leg length discrepancy in your shoes, as this swaying pelvis problem could cause chronic low back pain over time. 

 

mike

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post
 

The different calf sizes would cause your tibia's (lower leg) to be at different amounts of forward lean---this would affect your fore/aft balance and eliminate symmetry in your turns, symmetry is what you are looking for.  Add an appropriate thickness spoiler between the liner and shell to make up for the different amounts of lower leg forward lean.  By the way, what is the circumference of both your calf muscles at the top of the liner?

 

Find a fitter who can add a lifter to the short leg boot and cut the boot toe/heel lugs back to DIN Norm.

 

You need a alignment/balance expert to look at what is going on----sounds like your fitter isn't filling the bill. 

 

You might consider addressing the leg length discrepancy in your shoes, as this swaying pelvis problem could cause chronic low back pain over time. 

 

mike

   Interesting.  The bootfitter I saw here (recommended highly as one of epicski's best) did notice I have fore/aft balance issues.  He seemed like a pro to me in terms of analyzing alignment.   He did not talk about adding in a spoiler, but seemed frustrated with my boots, which he thought were limiting.   Is it possible he wants to wait to do that stuff (spoiler etc) until he has a boot that he thinks works better for me?

 

I will get back to you about the circumference of my calf muscles once I have a tape measure handy.

 

So miketsc or other bootfitters:  I live in Fort Collins, CO(an hour north of Denver), and can make up to mountains along I70 that are within a 2-3 hour drive for an alignment appointment.  I'll only likely be in CO for a year, so it'd be cool to get my alignment issues sorted sooner rather than later(I imagine there are a lot more talented alignment folks here that where I'll be living next year).  If you're not sure the current bootfitter fits the bill for me, who do you recommend I see?

post #6 of 6

get up to greg hoffman in lionshead at vail. http://www.skibootfitting.com

 

real deal guy, close to where you live.

 

jim

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