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Are new boots as part of alignment work necessary? HELP!

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I posted  this in the bootfitters forum, so I'm deleting the initial post here.  But feel free to read my post in the bootfitters forum, and add in thoughts here (since only bootfitters can post in that forum):

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/131863/are-new-boots-the-next-necessary-step-in-fixing-my-ski-problems


Edited by folkfan - 1/20/15 at 4:04pm
post #2 of 10

I'm sort of a fan of Full Tilts, actually of three piece boots in general and I got a pair of FT Classics this year.  The Classics have required a fair amount of work to get the fit correct.  Even though I like Full Tilts, the Classics have a terrible toe box, nobody's foot is shaped like that.  The women's Rumor has a much better toe box.  And in general, Full Tilts are not as easy to work on as two piece boots, especially for pressure points on or very near the instep.  Given your physical limitations I wonder what led you to purchase the FTs.  Also, have you ever done specific strengthening exercises to try to equalize the strength in your legs?  If not, you should.  Do you have lifts in your street shoes to compensate for the leg length discrepancy?  It seems to me that you might benefit from having the sole of your left foot built up to equalize your leg lengths.

 

At this point I'm unconvinced that alignment will do anything for the fact that your left leg is apparently substantially weaker than your right. I think serious exercise would do more, but it will not be a quick fix.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

IGiven your physical limitations I wonder what led you to purchase the FTs.  Also, have you ever done specific strengthening exercises to try to equalize the strength in your legs?  If not, you should.  Do you have lifts in your street shoes to compensate for the leg length discrepancy?  It seems to me that you might benefit from having the sole of your left foot built up to equalize your leg lengths.

At this point I'm unconvinced that alignment will do anything for the fact that your left leg is apparently substantially weaker than your right. I think serious exercise would do more, but it will not be a quick fix.

I bought the full tilts after finding a good ski shop in the town I was living in three years ago--they recommended them given my foot size.

I have had lifts in shows, but not currently.

I have done some specific exercises, but not recently. I agree that focused exercise could help--but there are limitations of my body that limit strength and balance on my left side. So I know alignment won't fix the problem 100 percent, I am wondering here how much alignment can help.
post #4 of 10

I would spend say $200 on pilates/yoga/core/PT classes first and see if you can get your body alignment straightened up a bit, before dumping that same money into boots.   Signing up and paying for the classes will help commit you to doing it over solo exercises.

 

I suppose it depends on if you want to put in that work.  

At least try to get that as good as you can before spending money on boots and putting them under the knife.

 

Otherwise, say next summer you set yourself to try to strengthen up, then you've got boots that are overly compensating and have to throw those out too.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I would spend say $200 on pilates/yoga/core/PT classes first and see if you can get your body alignment straightened up a bit, before dumping that same money into boots.   I suppose it depends on if you want to put in that work.  
At least try to get that as good as you can before going for the fitting.

Otherwise, say next summer you set yourself to try to strengthen up, then you've got boots that are overly compensating and have to throw those out too.

I'll be straight up about this. I have a minor physical disability. Always have, and always will. It isn't going away. I've been in my body almost 30 years and I know this to be true. Due to difficulty with proprioception on my left side, my left side is atrophied a bit. If I work out both sides equally, muscles on my right side will get bigger quicker. I'm in a yoga class right now to work on flexibility, which isn't good for me. I'm not asking you all if I can overcome my imbalances via exercise. I'm asking if a ski alignment can help me and how. So please help me with that question--thanks.
post #6 of 10
You should post this in Ask The Boot Guys where there are C Peds or the Injury Forum where there are Physical Therapists.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

bump.

post #8 of 10

folkfan,

I'm not sure I'm following what you're after.  If I'm not mistaken, the boot fitter you went to is well known and knowledgeable.  He has studied this craft for years.  He's also met you and studied your feet and how you walk.  You have stated you have a disability that weighs in on all of this.

 

Instead of listening to him, you want people that have never met you or have studied the trade, to giver their opinion and possibly WAGs.

 

I would search out a PT that understands Functional Movement to work on any physical issues that can be corrected or compensated for, and do what the fitter you already saw said.  I think him not messing with your current boots was his way of saving you money.  He's recommending you get different ones and is probably because he knows the boots you are in aren't right for you.  If he modifies these boots, you will still have problems and will have to go through it again.

 

He has nothing to gain from an unhappy customer with access to the internet.

 

Respectfully,

 

Ken

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your perspective ken. I have nothing but respect for people in this profession. I feel lucky to have access to folks with such amazing experience. I also happen to have not much cash at the moment. If I did, this wouldnt be an issue. If I can find a solution to my particular situation that isn't expensive, that'd be great. If what I really need is a new set-up, I'll go for it.

.
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

folkfan,
I'm not sure I'm following what you're after.  If I'm not mistaken, the boot fitter you went to is well known and knowledgeable.  He has studied this craft for years.  He's also met you and studied your feet and how you walk.  You have stated you have a disability that weighs in on all of this.

Instead of listening to him, you want people that have never met you or have studied the trade, to giver their opinion and possibly WAGs.

I would search out a PT that understands Functional Movement to work on any physical issues that can be corrected or compensated for, and do what the fitter you already saw said.  I think him not messing with your current boots was his way of saving you money.  He's recommending you get different ones and is probably because he knows the boots you are in aren't right for you.  If he modifies these boots, you will still have problems and will have to go through it again.

He has nothing to gain from an unhappy customer with access to the internet.

Respectfully,

Ken

Edited by folkfan - 1/20/15 at 8:35pm
post #10 of 10
For some reason I didn't catch the budget part. I assure you I understand it and one of the reasons I became an instructor is so I can afford to do this. Not for the pay but all the training I need and a season pass.

Get Chris Fellows book "Total Skiing". He goes through the functional movements needed for skiing and has the exercises needed to do that.

http://www.amazon.com/Total-Skiing-Chris-Fellows/dp/0736083650

The balance of your money put towards any of the following:

Lessons with someone that has experience with what you ae dealing with or at least understands he/she will have to work with you. If you talk to a snow sports supervisor ahead of time, they should be able to help you out and find a match.

Gym memberships that have the equipment Chris mentions in his boot.

A day with a physical trainer that can ski well. Preferably that also happens to be someone like Chad, Eviano, or Iriponsnow. I know there are others on this forum but those are who I know off the top of my head.

A form of exercising and the training to do it correctly that works on symmetry (I like Yoga but Pilates will work too. I'm sure there are others).

I would have a conversation with your bootfitter on the expectation of the total cost and start saving towards next year.

Keep at it. Each year I understand skiing better and my body works a little better. I've had to fix physical issues as well. I've been fortunate that most of my issues have been fixable. Even with that, it takes time, as I'm sure you are well aware.

Ken
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