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East Coast All Mountain

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

First post. Whoot!

 

I started skiing at 4, but got stopped at 9 and started back up again at 12, and have been skiing for four years past that. For all you non-mathematicians, that makes me 16.

I'm an middle intermediate level skier looking at buying a new pair of skis. I am currently beating the crap out of a pair of Rossignol Bandit B74's I got a few years back as a gift, but I am finding more and more that the ski is very heavy and slow for some of the bump/tree skiing I have recently begun teaching myself. I'm 6'3", 166 but still growing- I'll probably plateau at 6'4" next year.

I'm looking for a light, all mountain ski that has enough edge grip for some of the bad ice days I frequently see at Sugarbush. After some research, I really like the Hell and Back Steadfast 185 by Nordica, or possibly a Solomon rocker 2 90 185.

The thing is, I have no idea what I'm doing, as I have never bought a ski for myself, plus I'm cheap. Is my research on base? Have you seen a very inexpensive pair of Hell and Backs?

 

In return, I give you this great, practically hypnotic video on bump skiing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2pR9H6YegQ

 

Thanks,

Robert

post #2 of 8

Thanks for the video, Robert!  And welcome to Epic.

 

Others are likely to have better suggestions, but I'll throw a pitch for the Volkl Kink -- for the not very good reason that my son loves his (that's really a bad reason).  It's a light all-mountain twin with park chops (more or less, depending on where you mount them).  You might stick them on your demo list, at any rate.  We bought last year's model for under $300.

 

I've heard great things about the Hell & Back -- a buddy of mine who's about your height (but much heavier) loves his.  I assume you've demoed them; if you so, there's your ski.

 

Check out demo days this spring, too. They're usually free, and you can try a pile of next season's skis.  Demo skis that will remain unchanged (except perhaps for graphics) next season (that will take research), then buy this season's model, if possible.  They'll be cheaper.  A person can buy demo skis, too, and often you'll find good deals this way -- they come with bindings, for one thing.

 

Good luck.  Demo if you can.

post #3 of 8

Welcome to Epic.  Nordica didn't do any of us a favor when they decided to have a ski named Hell & Back plus they used the same name for a series of skis, so you get stupid stuff like Hell & Back Hell & Back.  Sheesh.  But, that's a minor point.  The fact is the Steadfast is a great ski, I think it was some magazine's ski of the year last season.  It is now gone, replaced by the NRGy90, which I haven't skied yet.  The Steadfast has been my daily driver for the past three seasons and will likely be that again this season, if we get any snow.  It is quick and it carves extremely well.  I think it's fine in the bumps too.  Most of my skiing is off-piste so I ski a lot of trees, bumps, crud and powder and it has handled all of it quite nicely.  But, you have to pay attention and your technique needs to be good to really appreciate it.  So, your option of the Salomon Rocker2 is a good one because it it a much less demanding ski.  I have only skied it a couple of runs and it was on fairly soft snow so I have no idea how it holds on hard snow.  The Rocker2 is also gone, replaced by the Quest series, which IIRC was mostly just a name change. 

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperBravo View Post
Have you seen a very inexpensive pair of Hell and Backs?

Hehe, asking Epic if we've ever seen inexpensive pair of Nordicas....

 

I'll echo what mtcyclist has said, the hellen/steadfast is a fine ski but does require some good technique. As a mid-intermediate this will either frustrate you or force you into being a better skier.

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Awesome. Thanks for the advice!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 

Thanks for the video, Robert!  And welcome to Epic.

 

Others are likely to have better suggestions, but I'll throw a pitch for the Volkl Kink -- for the not very good reason that my son loves his (that's really a bad reason).  It's a light all-mountain twin with park chops (more or less, depending on where you mount them).  You might stick them on your demo list, at any rate.  We bought last year's model for under $300.

 

I've heard great things about the Hell & Back -- a buddy of mine who's about your height (but much heavier) loves his.  I assume you've demoed them; if you so, there's your ski.

 

Check out demo days this spring, too. They're usually free, and you can try a pile of next season's skis.  Demo skis that will remain unchanged (except perhaps for graphics) next season (that will take research), then buy this season's model, if possible.  They'll be cheaper.  A person can buy demo skis, too, and often you'll find good deals this way -- they come with bindings, for one thing.

 

Good luck.  Demo if you can.

I'll check out the Kink, and look for some demo days in my area. I have a friend who ski a 2013 Kink and shares a sole length with me, so I've skied it one. Maybe it's the way he had it tuned, but it felt skidish and much more oriented for the park. I'll definitively put it on my demo list though.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

Welcome to Epic.  Nordica didn't do any of us a favor when they decided to have a ski named Hell & Back plus they used the same name for a series of skis, so you get stupid stuff like Hell & Back Hell & Back.  Sheesh.  But, that's a minor point.  The fact is the Steadfast is a great ski, I think it was some magazine's ski of the year last season.  It is now gone, replaced by the NRGy90, which I haven't skied yet.  The Steadfast has been my daily driver for the past three seasons and will likely be that again this season, if we get any snow.  It is quick and it carves extremely well.  I think it's fine in the bumps too.  Most of my skiing is off-piste so I ski a lot of trees, bumps, crud and powder and it has handled all of it quite nicely.  But, you have to pay attention and your technique needs to be good to really appreciate it.  So, your option of the Salomon Rocker2 is a good one because it it a much less demanding ski.  I have only skied it a couple of runs and it was on fairly soft snow so I have no idea how it holds on hard snow.  The Rocker2 is also gone, replaced by the Quest series, which IIRC was mostly just a name change. 

They also have a line of boots called the Hell and Back- one could presumably ski a Hell & Back Hell & Back with Hell & Backs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemon Zest View Post

I'll echo what mtcyclist has said, the hellen/steadfast is a fine ski but does require some good technique. As a mid-intermediate this will either frustrate you or force you into being a better skier.

I look forward to improving my skiing!

 

One more question- I'm in no hurry, and I would not mind waiting until the end of the season to buy some deep discount stuff. I'l demo the NRGy 100, 90, Salomon Q-90, rocker 2 100 (what presumably replaced the 90) and Volkl Kink and if I really like one or the other, how inexpensive could I presumable find a pair at the end of the season?

post #6 of 8

Check out www.skiessentials.com they are a sponsor here and have great prices on ski and bindings. I have bought 3 pair of and skis plus other stuff from them in the past year.

 

Great customer service if you need to call them or PM them from here.

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperBravo View Post

 

 

 Maybe it's the way he had it tuned, but it felt skidish and much more oriented for the park.

 

Probably the binding mount.  Park skis are often center mounted -- the center of the boot corresponds to dead center (more or less) on the ski.  All mountain skis are mounted further back, more toward the tail.  A binding mounted more centrally puts less body weight on the tails, and for this reason the tails may break loose on turns.  My son's are mounted to split the difference -- ahead of an all-mountain mount, back of a full-on park mount.

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Sick. I can drive to pinnacle ski and sports, Skiessentials' storefront, in about an hour.
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