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Skiing in Fog & Flat Light & Poor Visibility - Page 2

post #31 of 37
If you can SEE anything a fair distance in front of you, then you're not in my kind of fog.
post #32 of 37

Yes, I took the thread on a right turn by bringing in mountain biking... To your point, I worked at the Big Mountain, er, I mean Whitefish Resort back in the late 70's and experienced some of that fog you mention.

post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

If you can SEE anything a fair distance in front of you, then you're not in my kind of fog.


It's not the seeing in fog. It's accepted that you can't see the ground and can't see much in the Fog we're talking. The seeing part just relates to reg skiing. I promise you reg skiing improves by not staring at the immediate foreground. I slip into that all the time.

How does that relate to not being able to see the ground or what's ahead in the Fog? I don't know exactly but it makes sense. I think what happens is that when you're used to skiing looking at the immediate foreground- say 10 ft in front, your body - brain gets used to a certain level of information coming in and feedback/ response of feet/legs over a certain period of time. So it's used to seeing/ processing/ responding over a very short time span. Something happens where our mind gets comfortable with this situation. We get comfortable at that timescale of seeing/feeling/reacting.

In the fog that all goes away. The comfortable responses and time scale of seeing/feeling/reacting is broken since there's nothing to see. Now the problem with getting used to the 10ft ahead vision is that it takes very little time to cover those 10ft. So now you need the vision for the next 10ft. This is a nearly continuous need to see then act. If one is looking way down the trail then you plan things out and the brain deals with the execution in between. (i'm guessing here) So there's a certain amount of time that is already planned ahead and will be executed. Feedback from immediate terrain is just processed automatically - you glance maybe but your focused way ahead so the brain plans to deal with a certain amount of time ahead.

Who knows if this truly relates, but found this abstract of a research paper on internal pacing by athletes in excercise.

"The role of information processing between the brain and peripheral physiological systems in pacing and perception of effort."
Sports Med 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16869711/
Quote:
The brain centre controlling pace incorporates knowledge of the endpoint into an algorithm, together with memory of prior events of similar distance or duration, and knowledge of external (environmental) and internal (metabolic) conditions to set a particular optimal pacing strategy for a particular exercise bout. It is proposed that an internal clock, which appears to use scalar rather than absolute time scales, is used by the brain to generate knowledge of the duration or distance still to be covered,...

Note the importance of the "endpoint" into generating an algorithm to set a pacing strategy. Though it's different in skiing or mt. biking since it's not pacing of physical work, but an activity, there's a similarity I think.
post #34 of 37

What I really noticed when I passed the 60 mark was the slowness that my eyes adapted to shadow from bright light.  I dislike skiing in afternoon shadow at the end of the day more than fog.

 

No one can tell anyone else which lens will work best for them.  It is very individual.  In a ski shop on a cloudy day, ask to take several goggles with different lenses to the window.  See which one works best for you.  Smith.  Scott. Oakley.  Bolle.  Many others.  There is no one.  Just the one that works for you.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

In low vis & flat light conditions, try shifting you balance of senses from the eyes to your skis. Make round turns, keep the skis moving along the edges - tail follow tip thing. Feel for the terrain undulations under the skis. Time your turns with the terrain and soft legs.    

bingo- I never heard it explained so well. Stay slow and rythmic, shorten your turns, but keep turning, and "soft legs" what a great term. Because sometimes the terrain will flatten out or drop away and you have to go with it, mostly by feel. 

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

It's not the seeing in fog. It's accepted that you can't see the ground and can't see much in the Fog we're talking. The seeing part just relates to reg skiing. I promise you reg skiing improves by not staring at the immediate foreground. I slip into that all the time.

How does that relate to not being able to see the ground or what's ahead in the Fog? I don't know exactly but it makes sense. I think what happens is that when you're used to skiing looking at the immediate foreground- say 10 ft in front, your body - brain gets used to a certain level of information coming in and feedback/ response of feet/legs over a certain period of time. So it's used to seeing/ processing/ responding over a very short time span. Something happens where our mind gets comfortable with this situation. We get comfortable at that timescale of seeing/feeling/reacting.

In the fog that all goes away. The comfortable responses and time scale of seeing/feeling/reacting is broken since there's nothing to see. Now the problem with getting used to the 10ft ahead vision is that it takes very little time to cover those 10ft. So now you need the vision for the next 10ft. This is a nearly continuous need to see then act. If one is looking way down the trail then you plan things out and the brain deals with the execution in between. (i'm guessing here) So there's a certain amount of time that is already planned ahead and will be executed. Feedback from immediate terrain is just processed automatically - you glance maybe but your focused way ahead so the brain plans to deal with a certain amount of time ahead.

Who knows if this truly relates, but found this abstract of a research paper on internal pacing by athletes in excercise.

"The role of information processing between the brain and peripheral physiological systems in pacing and perception of effort."
Sports Med 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16869711/
Note the importance of the "endpoint" into generating an algorithm to set a pacing strategy. Though it's different in skiing or mt. biking since it's not pacing of physical work, but an activity, there's a similarity I think.

For me, the problem was that I needed to see the snow right in front of me, because I didn't have the skills to deal with it otherwise. Once that visibility was taken away, my weaknesses were exposed.

Now that I've had so many opportunities to practice low-vis skiing, it doesn't bother me much anymore. If I can still tell which way is up, then I'm ok.
post #37 of 37
Thread Starter 

I normally scan about 20 to 30 yards in front of looking for snow hazards such as mostly covered branches, unexplained dips, ice patches with all the snow scraped off, etc.  I am particularly cautious about those ice spots on groomed runs where prior skiers & boarders have scraped the snow off.   

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