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Bad Tune

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I am looking for some advice on what anyone thinks is an appropriate response to a bad tune.  Here is the issue:

 

I ordered a pair of skis from a reputable online shop (Nordica 188-30's) which are for my son who is a collegiate racer with the intent he would use these for USSA races, he also has 195-35's for FIS races. I ordered the skis set to .7 / 3 and received them without any issue.  After he had skied and trained on them a few times he complained that they did on turn well and he would not use them in a race.  I took them to a shop that has the SVST edge angle measuring tool and they were found to have a 2 deg base bevel and were convex in some areas, this explained the problem with the ski.  I wrote to the shop that did the set up and they have offered to pay for the flattening and resetting of the base edge.

 

The ski has now been ground 2X and I'm sure it took a few passes to get the ski flat, is this all I should expect from them?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 12

IDK, a 2 degree base bevel on a race ski is way more round than I'd like.  I prefer a 0 though.   They will need to take down more base and edge to bring it back to a 1 or .7  Tough to tell without actually doing the grind but a new ski should be able to handle that and last awhile longer.  What are the odds that the kid would be wanting new skis again next season anyway?  Used race skis don't hold their value nearly as well as more versatile skis do simply because the rules change and bases go though a lot with frequent hot boxing and grinding.  I doubt the shop owes you new skis but might be a sign to start learning to tune at home some.

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTSKIDAD View Post
 

I am looking for some advice on what anyone thinks is an appropriate response to a bad tune.  Here is the issue:

 

I ordered a pair of skis from a reputable online shop (Nordica 188-30's) which are for my son who is a collegiate racer with the intent he would use these for USSA races, he also has 195-35's for FIS races. I ordered the skis set to .7 / 3 and received them without any issue.  After he had skied and trained on them a few times he complained that they did on turn well and he would not use them in a race.  I took them to a shop that has the SVST edge angle measuring tool and they were found to have a 2 deg base bevel and were convex in some areas, this explained the problem with the ski.  I wrote to the shop that did the set up and they have offered to pay for the flattening and resetting of the base edge.

 

The ski has now been ground 2X and I'm sure it took a few passes to get the ski flat, is this all I should expect from them?

 

Thanks

If they are convex, this could be a warranty issue. The race skis I have had that were convex, were not built properly.  The skis were not pressed correctly... a manufacturing defect and they were replaed by the manufactuer. would defintely try to get a new pair of skis from the online shop or call Nordica customer service. I would never have an online shop tune a ski. Particularly race skis. With your racing participation, you must have a local shop that you trust.  

 

As far as the symptoms, what was it your son didn''t like when he skied them.........They did not turn well is pretty damn vague! And that does not sound to me like an over-beveled or convex ski, they would be almost too easy to turn. 

 

Can you be more specific on the what the ski was doing/or not?

 

I own an SVST Bevelmeter and unless perfectly clean (no metal shavings) and properly calibrated, it can read wrong. 

 

Did you check them with a true-bar yourself? Or ask the local shop to show you as they run a true-bar on them? 

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTSKIDAD View Post
 

I am looking for some advice on what anyone thinks is an appropriate response to a bad tune.  Here is the issue:

 

I ordered a pair of skis from a reputable online shop (Nordica 188-30's) which are for my son who is a collegiate racer with the intent he would use these for USSA races, he also has 195-35's for FIS races. I ordered the skis set to .7 / 3 and received them without any issue.  After he had skied and trained on them a few times he complained that they did on turn well and he would not use them in a race.  I took them to a shop that has the SVST edge angle measuring tool and they were found to have a 2 deg base bevel and were convex in some areas, this explained the problem with the ski.  I wrote to the shop that did the set up and they have offered to pay for the flattening and resetting of the base edge.

 

The ski has now been ground 2X and I'm sure it took a few passes to get the ski flat, is this all I should expect from them?

 

Thanks

 

If you took your kid to the doctor's office (@CTSKIDAD), and they did more harm than good, would you take your kid back there for any reason, for any discount? Thought so.

 

You are learning that for every good pro tune there are about three hack jobs. This does NOT mean you yourself can properly flatten, structure, bevel, edge, and polish an f'd-up ski anywhere near as well as a pro shop can do it. Yes, we have quite a few people on this board who are ace tuners who can do this "at home," whatever that may mean for them. (E.g., "home" might mean in the shop where they work, which might be in their basement.) But the many of the folks posting here are very much amateurs like me, and have not the experience, expertise, or tools to set the base and all the angles up right initially with the precision and polish you are looking for in a race ski. Presumably you are one of us amateurs at best, or you wouldn't be asking this question. DIY ongoing maintenance later? Absolutely.

 

So, I would vote that if you can get any kind of a refund out of your "bad doctor" shop, you should. If not, not. Either way, cut your losses and start over with a shop that experienced Bears can personally recommend. You will probably have to drive a bit. There are several. I know two or three personally, and another couple by reputation, but none is in CT. Maybe someone else will chime in here.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTSKIDAD View Post
 

I am looking for some advice on what anyone thinks is an appropriate response to a bad tune.  Here is the issue:

 

I ordered a pair of skis from a reputable online shop (Nordica 188-30's) which are for my son who is a collegiate racer with the intent he would use these for USSA races, he also has 195-35's for FIS races. I ordered the skis set to .7 / 3 and received them without any issue.  After he had skied and trained on them a few times he complained that they did on turn well and he would not use them in a race.  I took them to a shop that has the SVST edge angle measuring tool and they were found to have a 2 deg base bevel and were convex in some areas, this explained the problem with the ski.  I wrote to the shop that did the set up and they have offered to pay for the flattening and resetting of the base edge.

 

The ski has now been ground 2X and I'm sure it took a few passes to get the ski flat, is this all I should expect from them?

 

Thanks

Buying this caliber of skis online is a bad idea, unless you know how to use a true bar, check edge angles, decipher serial numbers, and/or have a reputable race service shop nearby.

 

My advice is to seek out good race service shop locally.

post #6 of 12
What do serial numbers tell you about the tune??
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

What do serial numbers tell you about the tune??

They tell you nothing about the tune. 

post #8 of 12
Well, why did you list that?
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, why did you list that?

Because a shop that's careless about one thing is probably careless about others, like making sure you get a matched pair. I went through a big PITA thing with that once, which I documented here. (Private sale, though.)

(Not to put words in chenzo's mouth. I'm interested to hear more info about what's in a serial number.)
post #10 of 12
Yes, the decipher part, as opposed to just the reading of it.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTSKIDAD View Post
 

I am looking for some advice on what anyone thinks is an appropriate response to a bad tune.  Here is the issue:

 

I ordered a pair of skis from a reputable online shop (Nordica 188-30's) which are for my son who is a collegiate racer with the intent he would use these for USSA races, he also has 195-35's for FIS races. I ordered the skis set to .7 / 3 and received them without any issue.  After he had skied and trained on them a few times he complained that they did on turn well and he would not use them in a race.  I took them to a shop that has the SVST edge angle measuring tool and they were found to have a 2 deg base bevel and were convex in some areas, this explained the problem with the ski.  I wrote to the shop that did the set up and they have offered to pay for the flattening and resetting of the base edge.

 

The ski has now been ground 2X and I'm sure it took a few passes to get the ski flat, is this all I should expect from them?

 

Thanks

If they are convex, this could be a warranty issue. The race skis I have had that were convex, were not built properly.  The skis were not pressed correctly... a manufacturing defect and they were replaed by the manufactuer. would defintely try to get a new pair of skis from the online shop or call Nordica customer service. I would never have an online shop tune a ski. Particularly race skis. With your racing participation, you must have a local shop that you trust.  

 

As far as the symptoms, what was it your son didn''t like when he skied them.........They did not turn well is pretty damn vague! And that does not sound to me like an over-beveled or convex ski, they would be almost too easy to turn. 

 

Can you be more specific on the what the ski was doing/or not?

 

I own an SVST Bevelmeter and unless perfectly clean (no metal shavings) and properly calibrated, it can read wrong. 

 

Did you check them with a true-bar yourself? Or ask the local shop to show you as they run a true-bar on them? 


I was thinking along these lines and would like to hear more about what was happening on snow. 

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

If they are convex, this could be a warranty issue. The race skis I have had that were convex, were not built properly.
 

 

I've come across a couple that were concave, mostly at the tip and the tail and thus naturally, or defectively railed.  Looked like a gulley in the middle of the ski. 

 

ConVEX would be base high, no?  Easier to fix if only by a little because it is easier to grind down a little base to flatten a ski than it is to grind down EDGE to flatten a ski.  But there are limits to both. 

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