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Yoga and Skiing

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
My wife got me to sign up for a Yoga class, Annasara (sp?) specifically. Anyway, I'm really enjoying it, somewhat to my surprise.

I realize its kind of a trendy thing at the moment (these things seem to happen in cycles), but lets ignore that..I've only been at it for a couple of months, but already I feel a quite a fair bit more limber and open, espically in hips and hamstrings, which can't be bad for skiing...also, I think I do have a bit more strength and tone, esp. in upper body, where I'm weakest. The other thing is that I think it is good in more subtle ways; body awareness and balance, to name the more obvious ones.

So I was wondering who else out there does Yoga, and how if at all do you think it relates to skiing? Do you find specific things that are especially good for skiing? Have you incorporated it into pre or post skiing? Etc..
post #2 of 10
Anasara, that's a hard-core way to begin! I find that yoga is very helpful to my skiing for all the reasons yoy mentioned. I have a quick 20 monute video tape and I find that when I use it in the morning before skiing, there is a dramatic difference in how I ski that day than on days I skip it. Balance, strength and flexibility -- how can these things not help skiing?
post #3 of 10
I started attending yoga classes about 6 months ago. I've really improved my balance and flexibility particularly in my lower body. And it's added a little bit of spice to my fitness routine.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AC:
Anasara, that's a hard-core way to begin<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Honestly, thats why I think I relate to it, its not dumbed down, seems to come from an authentic tradition, but at the same time it seems to have a contemporary understanding of physiology and where people are coming from. The actual work isn't _that_ hard, I get the sense they're takng it easy on us. [img]smile.gif[/img] One thing I really appreciate is its focus on how your body arranges itself, and ways you can work with that to have your body in a more natural neutral position.
post #5 of 10
AC: What tape do you have?
post #6 of 10
I use several of Rodney Yee's yoga videos -- the best being "Yoga Conditioning for Athletes", but that's not the 20 minute one, it's longer. The short one is Rodeny's "Power Yoga for Beginners", it's very easy, but great for stretching when time is limited.

Recommended Yoga Videos
post #7 of 10
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AC:
I use several of Rodney Yee's yoga videos -- the best being "Yoga Conditioning for Athletes", but that's not the 20 minute one, it's longer. The short one is Rodeny's "Power Yoga for Beginners", it's very easy, but great for stretching when time is limited.

Recommended Yoga Videos
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
post #8 of 10
I would highly recommend yoga for improving balance, flexibility, and reducing the chance of injury. Many injuries and chronic pain syndromes involve tight muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Additionally, the mental focus and breathing with yoga is beneficial for any athletic/performance endeavor.

I appreciate the above link for the videos, but I used the Amazon link at the bottom of this page, and found some used for less money.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
I find that for whatever reason I don't relate too much to the videos, though that's a really personally thing. For me, having an instructor -- even in a large class -- gives me more of the feedback that I need. There are also so many subtle issues involved in posture and so on, that it seems like it would be hard to cover them really well in a video. Not saying that videos aren't a good way to go, my wife really likes them, but for me classes have really helped. Of course, I guess thats really true of any sport.

The down side is that they are a bit expensive. Of course, there is also the I paid for the damn thing, I better go, effect!

With a month or two of classes, I've been able to establish a pretty good routine of practice at home.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Of course, the problem with classes is the uneveness; some instructors are really good, and some aren't. With a video, at least you're getting consistent product!
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