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OK, I'm a pussy....Cold and electricity.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

For years I have been using a Gerbings electric vest for cold weather motorcycling.

Northern Michigan has been skiing great this season except for the cold and the fierce wind.

Fortunately we live in the 21st century and have decent batteries.

 

I cut apart an old Ryobi charger to get the piece that fits their batteries.

Then, a bit of McGyvering and now I'm skiing really cold conditions in comfort.

 

When your core gets cold it shuts down blood flow to your peripherals and brain.

This is why boot heaters attack the problem of cold from the wrong end.

If your core is warn your body pumps warm blood to your peripherals.

Your feet are warm, your brain is working and life is generally good.

 

With this setup I can keep it at hot tub temperature under my jacket.

My hands and feet stay warm.

My attitude stays positive even with 5 degrees and 40 mph gusts.

Gerbings now makes their own batteries for their stuff but LIPO's are expensive so I used the ones I have.

Each battery lasts for about 2-2.5 hours while I'm cooking.

There are many other brands of heated clothing but Gerbings has been in business for a long time.

Totally made in the USA.

If I was skiing Colorado I could even power a lighter with this rig.

I do hook it up to my snowblower for warmth when blowing.

http://gerbing.com/

 

The 21st century is a great place, I now laugh at zero weather.

Freezing is for the un-electrified.

I wonder if heated skis would run faster in real cold conditions?

 

Gerbings vest with controller

 

Fanny pack with Ryobi batteries (weighs about five pounds)

 

Battery adapter made from old Ryobi charger

 

Note: No electrons were harmed in this work.  Gerbings controllers are designed to run on 14 vdc but this one doesn't mind the 18 vdc Ryobi LIPO.  Your experience may vary.

post #2 of 11

Don't you get too hot when actually skiing?

I have no problem keeping warm at whatever temperature. It's keeping warm on the chair without getting too hot once I'm skiing that prove to be more challenging.

 

Once I overheat, the sweat freeze and I'm chilled to the bone.

 

So to compensate, I bundle up prior to getting on the chair ( still a little cold and not entirely comfortable) to keep a somewhat tolerable balance.   

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

It has a throttle.

post #4 of 11

You should rig it to give you a shock whenever you do something wrong:devil: 

post #5 of 11
Wouldn't work for me. I often have an overhead core and cold toes at the same time. If it works for you, great.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Wouldn't work for me. I often have an overhead core and cold toes at the same time. If it works for you, great.

 

I'll second that one. Friday in high 20's temps, by the last few runs, I was skiing with my jacket unzipped to try to cool off. Then I'd zip it back up for the lift, and my toes were a little cold the whole time.

 

I think what I really need is a gondola, or enclosed lift, or some kind of lift heater! Maybe if they'd put these everywhere?

 

 

Neat setup though Dakine! And nice McGyver'ing... if the controller isn't rated for 18V and eventually burns/craps out, there are 14V batteries similar to the one's you're using.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi 20's, what's that?

I'm talking below zero, 40 mph gusts and white out visibility.

Fresh tracks in windpack all day.

The only ones out besides me are the kids that always make it to the ski areas when schools close.

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 

Hi 20's, what's that?

I'm talking below zero, 40 mph gusts and white out visibility.

Fresh tracks in windpack all day.

The only ones out besides me are the kids that always make it to the ski areas when schools close.

 

Ah... I've never skied in below zero temps. No idea how I'd handle it other than to first try more layers. In those conditions, what's your setup with the vest? Base layer/vest/jacket? Or do you still need more?

post #9 of 11

It does get cold here.  My typical gear is base layer (top and bottom), fleece top, ski pants, down vest, ski jacket, hemet, goggles, mits, and my warm comfy ski boots.  My toes do get cold.  Next pair of boots will be equiped with heaters.

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

You need a decent baselayer because the vest can get pretty hot but not too thick because you want the heat to go in not out.

I wear a synthetic tee and a tight lycra long sleeve top.

Then the vest.

Then a down sweater and a heavy duty shell.

Below, I wear two sets of boot top long underwear and insulated pants.

Boot Gloves on the boots help keep the heat in.

Mittens on the hands.

This really works but it seems almost disorienting to have a hot core when it is an arctic whiteout outside of the bubble.

Don't try this if you don't want to get hooked on electricity.

If it works for NASA it's OK by me.

 

Body fat and size are the big determinants of how well you weather cold.

Some of those 350 pound Packers almost looked to be sweating.

 

The vest will also fit under a speed suit.....

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

It does get cold here.  My typical gear is base layer (top and bottom), fleece top, ski pants, down vest, ski jacket, hemet, goggles, mits, and my warm comfy ski boots.  My toes do get cold.  Next pair of boots will be equiped with heaters.


You're getting old, but I hate to say it so am I.

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