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Ski "Tips and Secrets" of the Advanced Skier and Beyond - Page 3

post #61 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

...


Now that some time has passed, like to provide a bit of clarity re: my touch/no touch post.

 

I do not mind playing along especially if there is a chance that I'm being "set up" for a discredit or fool label.

That is why I presented that question to the forum for help.

Thank you for your timely "grownup" post markojp. As far as I can tell, bs was exposed.

post #62 of 85
Quote:

Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

 

Pardon my ignorance but who is Josh? Stowe Gondola attendant?

 

No need to know if don't already. 

post #63 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

 
The only time I use an actual pole plant would be during a "stopgap save." Example being a foot or more of fresh powder on top of a mogul run, (got to be some of the best fun on the mountain) while skiing them LOOSE at speed and "just reacting" occasionally an unexpected hit will not just knock you back to balance, but beyond, to the point of body wants to meet pillow of snow. Then and only then do I use a pole plant to keep me upright and continuing.

Like to take a "time out" from the thread to ask a question of those who enjoy moguls, and who knows, the responses might actually fit right in with good insight. Has any one else noticed what I am trying to convey in the above post? That is, a foot or more of powder on top of a predefined mogul run. Skiing them early on before the powder is compressed and pushed away. Couple of thoughts to set up and ponder. The moguls seem tighter together, which kinda makes sense. The ride is smoother due to ample fluff, obvious, but when taken together, they can be skied in a more mentally relaxed manner which in itself creates the excitement I am alluding to. One does have to retain a semblance of good form, but by allowing the unexpected to control me for a change, I find the moguls themselves snapping me back up straight. It is that feeling of living on the edge of disaster and being saved by something outside of your own doing which is so exhilarating. Best done in a consistent intermediate/high intermediate pitch of zip line moguls. Any one else experience this?

So you're saying that a foot of powder on a bump run is special? Well, yeah. You do describe some of the things that make it special well. But let them eat cake. Being in that place at that time is about a hundred times more challenging for many of us than skiing it optimally once we get there. Sort of like talking about best techniques for coping with champagne and caviar.
post #64 of 85

Actually, if you are on a pair of 98+ skis and hitting the bumps on a intermediate pitched trail that's covered by a foot of snow, you are screwing the pooch somewhere.    

post #65 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


So you're saying that a foot of powder on a bump run is special? Well, yeah. You do describe some of the things that make it special well. But let them eat cake. Being in that place at that time is about a hundred times more challenging for many of us than skiing it optimally once we get there. Sort of like talking about best techniques for coping with champagne and caviar.


Thank you for your input qcanoe. You present and pen your thoughts in a well written manner.

 

I see the importance of coming clean on a couple of points. I place myself in the group you describe. My "time out" was to share an experience as opposed to a technique, while raising awareness of what's possible. I personally remember 5-6 mogul runs that can be included as part of that experience. Those 5/6 runs are spread out over 46 years and most likely 1200+ days on the hill.

 

So no, in this case, I am unable to beckon and recreate that experience at will, or share a system to guarantee others to succeed in doing so. I can only hope that the time spent to describe and share that experience motivates someone else to experiment and attain the same. I can tell you it's worth it.

 

Oh, one more thing, I too have been known to eat cake ;).

 

JS

post #66 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

Actually, if you are on a pair of 98+ skis and hitting the bumps on a intermediate pitched trail that's covered by a foot of snow, you are screwing the pooch somewhere.    


I like it. That is pretty funny KingGrump. Got to wonder if the screen name belies you.

post #67 of 85

Well, it wasn't a foot of fresh, but I had the opportunity to ski 10" of Vermont blower down Stowe's National...  then down Goat...  then down Starr...  then down Lookout.

 

I'd like to thank all the Stowe locals for skiing the trees and leaving the powder bumps to me, because I was managing turns without even hitting a bump.

 

So, in the interests of this thread -- i.e., "tips and secrets" -- SKI THE TREES!!!!  That's where the good snow is!  Always!

 

:D

post #68 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

"...the conditions at hand" are what matter most.  As you alluded to in your first post, advanced/accomplished/good/expert skiers adjust their technique for the terrain and the conditions.  It may not be obvious to the casual observer but it happens.

I agree.  I am constantly adjusting what I am doing based on the conditions at hand.  Not too long ago a member of my ski club who has seen me ski out west in big terrain, gave me a wonderful compliment by telling me that I looked the same no matter the conditions and how do I do that?  I told him though it may look the same to you I am constantly adjusting, looking down field noting snow conditions, obstacles, pitch, bumps....everything and that I adjust my turn and my body position to suit all the while trying to keep a proper balance and stance.

 

For a tip of my own, or rather one that my coach at the Extremely Canadian Steeps Clinic at Whistler told me when he noticed me taking a defensive position (back seat) on the steepest pitches.  He told me to "Push your Bush!" when on steep terrain.  By pushing your hips (and the bush underneath) forward, you will keep forward pressure on the tongue of your boot which will help to initiate the turn and to keep your edges engaged.  This puts you in a more offensive and aggressive position to better tackle the terrain at hand.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G

post #69 of 85
Quote:

Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

 

I like it. That is pretty funny KingGrump. Got to wonder if the screen name belies you.

 

I tell it like it is. Think Nicholson in “A Few Good Men”. 

I like to think I’m the harbinger of truth. Mother Nature is actually the one wielding the sledge hammer. :cool

 

I have skied with many Epic Bears, so you can ask them regarding my normal demeanor.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

 

For a tip of my own, or rather one that my coach at the Extremely Canadian Steeps Clinic at Whistler told me when he noticed me taking a defensive position (back seat) on the steepest pitches.  He told me to "Push your Bush!" when on steep terrain.  By pushing your hips (and the bush underneath) forward, you will keep forward pressure on the tongue of your boot which will help to initiate the turn and to keep your edges engaged.  This puts you in a more offensive and aggressive position to better tackle the terrain at hand.

 

 

I’ve seen pics of you. Unless your day job is the bearded lady at the local circus, you are using the wrong term for that particular move. “Picket Fence” is the proper term in conformance with your gender. :D

post #70 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

Well, it wasn't a foot of fresh, but I had the opportunity to ski 10" of Vermont blower down Stowe's National...  then down Goat...  then down Starr...  then down Lookout.

 

I'd like to thank all the Stowe locals for skiing the trees and leaving the powder bumps to me, because I was managing turns without even hitting a bump.

 

So, in the interests of this thread -- i.e., "tips and secrets" -- SKI THE TREES!!!!  That's where the good snow is!  Always!

 

:D


That's hilarious KevinF! Great tip.

post #71 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

I tell it like it is. Think Nicholson in “A Few Good Men”. 

I like to think I’m the harbinger of truth. Mother Nature is actually the one wielding the sledge hammer. :cool

 

I have skied with many Epic Bears, so you can ask them regarding my normal demeanor.  

 

KingGrump's "normal demeanor" is to ski with his boots unbuckled to something, preferably named "Death's Revenge" or some such.  You look over the edge with him and :eek.  KG will say "how about this?", which is a rhetorical question.  You will say "Uhhhhh, you going to buckle your boots?".  KG will say "no, I only do that for hard stuff" while dropping in and making the Grim Reaper himself watch in awe.

 

You, now left with no choice but to follow, drop in.  You will (probably) not make it look quite that easy.

 

:D

post #72 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

I tell it like it is. Think Nicholson in “A Few Good Men”.

I like to think I’m the harbinger of truth. Mother Nature is actually the one wielding the sledge hammer. :cool

 

I have skied with many Epic Bears, so you can ask them regarding my normal demeanor.

 

 

 

I’ve seen pics of you. Unless your day job is the bearded lady at the local circus, you are using the wrong term for that particular move. “Picket Fence” is the proper term in conformance with your gender. :D

 

I don't know about you but I do in fact have a bush growing under my picket fence!  :D  Besides, push your bush, is way catchier than push your picket fence!

 

It all good.

 

Rick G


Edited by rickg - 2/26/15 at 12:43pm
post #73 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post
 

I believe that it's a fairly safe statement to say that (maybe 100%) of skiers look forward to skiing ..... in good conditions. My guess is that the percentage drops fairly quickly as you keep adding from the following list:

 

1.) Sub zero temps

2.) Wind

3.) Fog/Low visibility

3.) Hard pack/ice

4.) Breakable crust

5.) Windblown

6.) Heavy wet/mash potato snow

7.) Death cookie crystals/yellow snow

8.) Roots, rocks and various forms of dirt/n/shrubbery improving to thin cover

9.) Boilerplate

 

Here is a tip that seems both fairly innocuous and unhelpful at the same time, but good skiers (knowingly or not) have used it to improve their skiing.

Good skiers hone their skills by skiing in less than stellar conditions. As in a previous post I made where I challenge my limits by changing stance or lifting a foot, skiing in any of the above helps your brain form new neurons to fire minor muscle movements and thus making you a better skier in ALL conditions.

So make the most of a "bad day" during a vacation week you paid for and get out there to improve your skiing.

 

JS

 

Way back when, I was a wait for a good weekend skier.  Would only manage 10-15 days a season.  Then I took a weekend ski bum job at the local area as a Safety Ranger and was required to do one night shift during the week and 2 shifts on the weekend.  That meant I was on the snow patrolling and yelling at kids :) no matter the conditions.  Rain, slush, hard pack, boiler plate etc. I was on the snow.  My quiver of skills grew quite a bit during those years which have served me well when skiing the big mountains as you never quite know what you will get.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G


Edited by rickg - 2/26/15 at 1:17pm
post #74 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

 

I don't know about you buy I do in fact have a bush growing under my picket fence!  :D  Besides, push your bush, is way catchier than push your picket fence!

 

 

I learned the same move years ago with the SSD at TSV. His description was make like you are getting it on thru a picket fence.

My agreement with him was that if my wife call and ask why there is a section of picket fence from Home Depot in the bedroom, just tell her i'm working on my skiing. :D

 

BTW, "push the bush" was also his suggested imagining for the ladies in our ski week.   

post #75 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post
 


Yes Tog, I'd say that is most likely accurate. Only time I can say with 100% confidence that my pole tips are used is in the lift line, poling the flats or streaking by a stuck snowboarder with a gift offering :).

 

I say that with a bit of wonder, good and/or bad thinking of my form, but not one from a standpoint of over concern.

I am with you on most groomers, my poles rarely make contact.  But in bumps?  My pole plants definitely touch the ground.  It is the pole plant that helps keep me forward and helps to initiate the turn by reaching forward to plant.  Now I am not talking about stabbing the ground, but a definite touch to the ground to help with the turn initiation.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G

post #76 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

I learned the same move years ago with the SSD at TSV. His description was make like you are getting it on thru a picket fence.

My agreement with him was that if my wife call and ask why there is a section of picket fence from Home Depot in the bedroom, just tell her i'm working on my skiing. :D

 

BTW, "push the bush" was also his suggested imagining for the ladies in our ski week.

The first time I had heard it was 2 years ago when my coach at Whistler said it to me when pointing out my deficiencies on the screen during our video critique.  For some reason that clicked with me. It is something I think about when skiing especially during warm up runs to get me in an offensive stance.  I like to ski fast and aggressive and that simple tip has definitely helped.

 

Ski on!

 

Rick G

post #77 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

 

KingGrump's "normal demeanor" is to ski with his boots unbuckled to something, preferably named "Death's Revenge" or some such.  You look over the edge with him and :eek.  KG will say "how about this?", which is a rhetorical question.  You will say "Uhhhhh, you going to buckle your boots?".  KG will say "no, I only do that for hard stuff" while dropping in and making the Grim Reaper himself watch in awe.

 

You, now left with no choice but to follow, drop in.  You will (probably) not make it look quite that easy.

 

:D


Not a surprise after viewing KG's profile, 90+ days a year on the hill, Wow.

post #78 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 

I am with you on most groomers, my poles rarely make contact.  But in bumps?  My pole plants definitely touch the ground.  It is the pole plant that helps keep me forward and helps to initiate the turn by reaching forward to plant.  Now I am not talking about stabbing the ground, but a definite touch to the ground to help with the turn initiation.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G

I'm fairly sure my statement is accurate rickg. Realizing that my ski days may be numbered, I did something for the first time two weeks ago. I had a friend video 2 clips of me skiing hero moguls at Belleayre in NY as a keep stake to view in old age. Once I learn how to transfer those from my phone to the desktop and upload them to Vimeo, I'll post them on this thread. Maybe I do exactly what you state.


 
post #79 of 85

Links,  I am not an instructor but have had many bump lessons and that is how I was taught.   Of course that was back in the day on straight skls, but I think I have successfully adapted to the new ski technology.  In the bumps, I can ski old school or separate my stance and carve a bit in the bumps if conditions permit.  It is fun learning new skills at an advanced age.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G

post #80 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 

Links,  I am not an instructor but have had many bump lessons and that is how I was taught.   Of course that was back in the day on straight skls, but I think I have successfully adapted to the new ski technology.  In the bumps, I can ski old school or separate my stance and carve a bit in the bumps if conditions permit.  It is fun learning new skills at an advanced age.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G


Sure, at least you were taught. I'm not making a representation of right or wrong, only sharing what has evolved from a skier who has never really taken a lesson.

post #81 of 85

A real tip for the advanced skier - take a lesson. Trust me, it won't kill ya. :D

post #82 of 85
Thread Starter 

There you go KG, you're right and making me laugh again.

 

I actually have tagged along on a group bump lesson a couple of times at the request of two friends who wanted me to join them. They wanted to improve their bump aptitudes, I was already more than pleased. This was in my mid to late 40's, a time when, while I'm sure it happened, I don't remember missing a mogul during a run. I went with the attitude that I might learn something new and at worst, we might even get to "ski a few and have fun!"

post #83 of 85

A guy I know who is an amazing skier said he taught himself by doing repeated rapid turns on easier terrain until he thought his legs would fall off.

 

Using his method I can now move through medium moguls with ease and usually handle hard moguls without flailing or hop and stop.  Except for the occasional huge wipeout from going 15 mph through bumps-hey I'm not quite 40 and when I am I'll say I'm not quite 50 yet.

post #84 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter5 View Post
 

A guy I know who is an amazing skier said he taught himself by doing repeated rapid turns on easier terrain until he thought his legs would fall off.

 

Using his method I can now move through medium moguls with ease and usually handle hard moguls without flailing or hop and stop.  Except for the occasional huge wipeout from going 15 mph through bumps-hey I'm not quite 40 and when I am I'll say I'm not quite 50 yet.

Impressive while simple concept, that goes to show, if one has the desire to accomplish something, it can be figured out. Thanks Peter5. I like it.

post #85 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post
The only time I use an actual pole plant would be during a "stopgap save." Example being a foot or more of fresh powder on top of a mogul run, (got to be some of the best fun on the mountain) while skiing them LOOSE at speed and "just reacting" occasionally an unexpected hit will not just knock you back to balance, but beyond, to the point of body wants to meet pillow of snow. Then and only then do I use a pole plant to keep me upright and continuing.

Stop gap save pole plant might be ok for slow skiing in powder bumps, but try it at speed on hardpack and you could just break your wrist.

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