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The Case of the Missing Ski Pole

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Wednesday, New Year's Eve day. A beautiful and sunny day which saw hordes converging on the Thunderhead Lodge, Steamboat Ski Resort's mid-mountain lodge, which sits atop the gondola. Our intrepid skier skis up the rise to get as close to the steps to the lodge as possible. Finding a break in the skis lined up in the snow, he skis in and steps out of his bindings. Stabbing his poles into the snow on either side of his skis, he ignores the small voice within saying "this is probably not a great idea." He needs to go get the lunch backpack at basket check to feed his hungry family and keep them fueled for more skiing.

After lunch, our skier and his family head back to their skis. Our skier sees his skis laying in the snow, bracketed on one side by his Swix Cougar composite poles, and on the other by a Christy Sports rental Leki.

Cursing ensues.

I left a note with my phone number and a request to text me when the clueless 17 year old male who is clearly, in my mind, the culprit realizes his mistake. Told all the liftees. Told the lost and found. Told everyone, including my family, ad nauseam, how I bought the poles brand new from a second hand sports store for twenty bucks. How they were too long and I softened the grips up with near-boiling water and pulled them off. Marked the poles, put masking tape over, cut them down to size with a hacksaw. Don't want to go back to my cheap Scott aluminum poles, which anyway are hanging in the garage in Connecticut.

Next day I rented poles at Christy Sports and told them my sob story, asked them to keep a lookout for when the clueless n00b returns. Skied all day with the rental poles, which I honestly don't notice a huge difference in, but that's beside the point, man!

End of the day, return my rental poles. No clueless teenager returned your pole, sir.

Standing in the shuttle line, grousing yet again about the episode. My beautiful nineteen-year old stepdaughter nudges me, says "isn't that your pole?"

I turn to look at the clueless young man standing next to me holding a grey Leki aluminum pole and a black, and much skinnier, Swix Cougar composite pole. I say to him "Dude, that's my pole!" He says, with a shrug, "sorry man, my bad," and hands me my pole. I say you're right it's your bad, pay more attention next time, at which point he slinks off to another spot in the shuttle waiting area.

What really bugged me wasn't his cluelessness in taking my pole, but rather that he clearly noticed at some point he had mismatched poles and did nothing to investigate it.

However, happy ending, lesson learned. Listen to the little voice and always hang your poles off the ends of your skis.

Next day I told lost and found and the guys at Christy Sports they could quit looking for my pole because, on a mountain that gets tens of thousands of skier visits, my pole wound up next to me in the shuttle line.

Happy New Year, everyone.
post #2 of 9

I also lost a pole exactly like that on New Year's Eve at the boat...:duel:

post #3 of 9

I could say something about people who leave their skis lying on the snow, leaving no path from lift to lodge, but I won't.

post #4 of 9

i will!

The people who just leave their skis in the snow, when racks are available to me are the same as the entitled who would doublepark or idle in a red zone while they just go "run in" for something really quick.  Yes, we get it.  You're busy, you have things on your mind, you're in a rush, your time is valuable.  So is everyone else.

We're not animals, we live in a society.

 

Who I see are the worst are the kids, especially race team kids-even worse than college bros.  They form the impenetrable row of skis and do it with the air of we own the mountain we can just put our stuff where ever we want, when really they should be the ones being taught to know better, since they are wearing the mountain's name on their jacket, rather than being brats.

 

OK, off my oldman "get off my snow" soap box now.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Ordinarily I completely agree with you, but here there was no room in the racks, and everyone was leaving their skis in the snow. It was clearly something done routinely, as the area they were left in was very orderly. I even saw ski school instructors leaving their group's skis there.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

i will!

The people who just leave their skis in the snow, when racks are available to me are the same as the entitled who would doublepark or idle in a red zone while they just go "run in" for something really quick.  Yes, we get it.  You're busy, you have things on your mind, you're in a rush, your time is valuable.  So is everyone else.

We're not animals, we live in a society.

 

Who I see are the worst are the kids, especially race team kids-even worse than college bros.  They form the impenetrable row of skis and do it with the air of we own the mountain we can just put our stuff where ever we want, when really they should be the ones being taught to know better, since they are wearing the mountain's name on their jacket, rather than being brats.

 

OK, off my oldman "get off my snow" soap box now.

 

What is a red zone?

 

Generally I make it a point to talk to the coach of the offending brats about their act of inconsideration. As they say - shit flows down hill.  

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

 

What is a red zone?

 

I meant like fire lanes or other no-stopping red painted curb areas.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbeinct View Post
Next day I told lost and found and the guys at Christy Sports they could quit looking for my pole
 

 

post #9 of 9

Sometimes the kids skis are too short for the racks. And it's hard for the kids in a given group to keep their skis together on a rack. So I get why the teams do it--at least the little ones. 

If that were the worst thing the teams do . . .  The other day I heard a coach tell his kids "The most important thing is to look over your shoulder before you start" as the stood to the side well off the cat track. I almost fell down in shock. 

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