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Freestyle ski questions...FEAR of being watched

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm more of an all-mountain, backcountry type skiier. But i just recently bought some twin tips from Line to get myself more familiar with the park. Now i've fallen on pavement before from longboarding on the streets of SoCal, and obviously fallen on the hard packed snow. But for me, fallen in the park (boxes and rails - easier stuff) is something i dont wanna do. I feel like the mountain is all about people looking at one-another and seeing who's got "Skill". And although i got all-mountain skill, my park skill is at the bottom of the totem pole. I used to snowboard years ago and rails and boxes, including small jumps definitley come off easier on a snowboard. But i have a problem getting my tips up, and having the fear of falling while everyone is watching. What is a way to just go out and say "fuck it". In the areas i ski in, more snowboarders run the park, so i defnintley done want to look like the guy with skis, coming into the park and destroying their land (even though i could care less). 

 

Any advice?

post #2 of 5
Make sure you have good health insurance. biggrin.gif
post #3 of 5

Wait 10 years. Then you won't care how you look to other people. Then again, you probably won't care about the park either. All the cues I'm getting from your post suggest you're a young man in your teens or early 20's. So it makes sense that your perception is that it's all about being watched and judged. However, once you hit your late 20's, you'll realize two things: You don't care what other people think of your skiing, and that really people aren't that concerned with how you look either. Skiing is really a pretty selfish sport. People only care about your skiing when it negatively affects theirs. 

 

And speaking as a former park rat, the allure of the park fades pretty quickly once you're past your 25th birthday. The adolescent one upsmanship and showing off gets old, and the bro culture just doesn't really hold the same glamour once you've put a quarter century on the clock. That, and the park f***ing hurts, man. Its not about if you're gonna get hurt, its about how often and how bad. Hurting yourself on a regular basis isn't fun for that long, and really your body just doesn't like it when you're not 19 anymore. 

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstralex View Post
 

 What is a way to just go out and say "fuck it". In the areas i ski in, more snowboarders run the park, so i defnintley done want to look like the guy with skis, coming into the park and destroying their land (even though i could care less). 

 

Any advice?

 

Well, maybe not heavily.  Maybe you should try some dry land training to increase your confidence level.  Hit the tramp some and do some cross country running where you launch off some drops while running down hill.  If you attack the features deliberately and with confidence you'll come across as competent even if you don't land everything perfectly. Attitude matters.

post #5 of 5

Well, I'm 63, so I'm not inclined to try a terrain park. I'd break myself into a million pieces if I biffed it and landed on a rail, but when I was 25 I decided I wanted to learn ski ballet. The thought that I would look silly if I did a faceplant while attempting a trick did cross my mind, but I learned to push it out and not worry about it. If I went splat once in a while, I just picked myself up and tried again. I still do some of that stuff and I still splat now and then, but I don't let it bother me. And when I'm really rockin' it, I get to hear someone say "Hey lookit dat guy!" It makes all the crack-ups worth it.

 

The main hazard of falling in the park isn't being seen doing it, anyway. It's landing on the hardware and mangling your bod'. Body armor is highly recommended. The places I ski, Winter Park and Copper, have some beginner-oriented parks where the consequences of a fumble are less severe. They would be a good place to get the hang of things and build confidence before "going big".

 

I will second crgildart's advice about dry land training, also (He was an old-school free-dogger, too). I'd even encourage you to learn a few fundamental ballet spins and inside ski turns before attempting the park. You'll develop a better sense of balance and edge control, which will help while sliding on the park features. Try working on getting a 1080 on one leg in both directions, on each leg. Last month I spent a couple of runs noodling around like that with three young guys I met on the lift. We were all doing Reuels, tip-drag spins and whatever. It was great seeing someone younger than 50 trying the old stuff. And we just laughed and shook it off if someone fell.

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