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Why do some accomplished skiers stop skiing? - Page 10

post #271 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post

 

Good post Oisin and much of it sadly I agree is true.....the high end nonsense is killing our sport.

Check out Milt's lodge on the backside of King Pine. Happy race kids and ski campers laughing and eating the delicious cheap pizza and snacks....

Seriously might rekindle your fire....and Pitch Pine is super steep which is fun! 

Let's all support our little local ski areas and fight back against megaskiing.....
Thanks
I've never skied at King Pine although, until a few months ago, I owned a place on the other side of the hill in Madison. It does seem to be the kind of place I grew up skiing with.

 

@oisin, send me a PM. I have been off snow for six weeks after a crash and won't be back for another three, probably. But I don't live too far away from King Pine and would like to ski with you and other local Bears. I'll be ramping it up slowly, but with determination. Also never skied there, strangely enough. 

post #272 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

@oisin, send me a PM. I have been off snow for six weeks after a crash and won't be back for another three, probably. But I don't live too far away from King Pine and would like to ski with you and other local Bears. I'll be ramping it up slowly, but with determination. Also never skied there, strangely enough. 


if you guys do decide to go on a weekend let me know.. I've got a place up the road next off Stark rd and Dolph pond ...

 

 

 I did get a chuckle out of this .. " Pitch Pine is super steep which is fun" ... I think it might have been closed the one day we skied there , due to no coverage

post #273 of 286

I think one of the things that may be hurting the overall involvement for us "older" skiers is the fact that because we now have more money, time and preference for a preconceived types of conditions that we tend to be way too picky about when and where we will ski -- weather has to be just right, snow conditions have to be just right, crowd conditions, road conditions, and on and on. Pretty easy to rationalize that I'd rather be doing something else.   In the old days, when I was rostered for certain days, I simply had to be on the mountain.  The rest didn't matter.  Many times, seemingly nasty day turned out to be wonderful and in many cases the ones I remember the most.  

post #274 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsitzmark View Post
 

I think one of the things that may be hurting the overall involvement for us "older" skiers is the fact that because we now have more money, time and preference for a preconceived types of conditions that we tend to be way too picky about when and where we will ski -- weather has to be just right, snow conditions have to be just right, crowd conditions, road conditions, and on and on. Pretty easy to rationalize that I'd rather be doing something else.   In the old days, when I was rostered for certain days, I simply had to be on the mountain.  The rest didn't matter.  Many times, seemingly nasty day turned out to be wonderful and in many cases the ones I remember the most.  

 

I didn't realize this but this has actually affected me a lot this season. The past 3 weekends one of my buddies wanted to go skiing with me but we just kept going back and forth on his choice of mountain. I kept saying the snow was too icy and didn't want to drive that far and spend that much money on a resort that can't be bothered to take care of its snow (I had been there a month ago and swore I was never going back), so neither of us ended up going...

post #275 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartnyc View Post
 
 

I didn't realize this but this has actually affected me a lot this season. The past 3 weekends one of my buddies wanted to go skiing with me but we just kept going back and forth on his choice of mountain. I kept saying the snow was too icy and didn't want to drive that far and spend that much money on a resort that can't be bothered to take care of its snow (I had been there a month ago and swore I was never going back), so neither of us ended up going...

 

It's simply a more specific way of saying

"the skiing I can do has lost its pull on me"
AKA
"the skiing I can do I don't want to do"

AKA

"the thrill, charm, magic  is not there" 

 

 

For me this season, the more my friends try to get me to go the more I really hate the sport. 

post #276 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

It's simply a more specific way of saying

"the skiing I can do has lost its pull on me"
AKA
"the skiing I can do I don't want to do"

AKA

"the thrill, charm, magic  is not there" 

 

 

For me this season, the more my friends try to get me to go the more I really hate the sport. 

This rings the bell. I think about the way I could ski 15 or 20 years ago and realize I cannot  ski that way anymore. I would love to feel that rush, the exhilaration of speed athleticism and balance again but I know I cannot. Much of the appeal of skiing was the gradual improvement, pursuing the goal of becoming a great skier. Now I'm on the downslope (no pun intended) of things and that appeal is gone.

post #277 of 286

Age related degradation of skiing (and loving) skills is a reality; however, as the saying goes, "you are as young as you think you are"!  What I lack in brute strength and endurance I make up for with finesse and style (that has been hard earned by practice over many winters).  Not having anything to prove nor really caring who is the "best" gives one a real edge in the enjoying it department!  I'm still love the snow covered mountain and hope that's the case for another 20 or so years!

post #278 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post
 

This rings the bell. I think about the way I could ski 15 or 20 years ago and realize I cannot  ski that way anymore. I would love to feel that rush, the exhilaration of speed athleticism and balance again but I know I cannot. Much of the appeal of skiing was the gradual improvement, pursuing the goal of becoming a great skier. Now I'm on the downslope (no pun intended) of things and that appeal is gone.

It's way easier said than done but I think you can find a new view or angle on the sport. The last few years I'm more focussed on touring and with the overall lack of snow I am even out meadow skipping (I can't believe it). I actually am enjoying the mellow skiing and exploring factor. I guess I have been forced to enjoy what I used to call hippie skiing. Either way I am finding that what I really love is just being out n the mountains with friends. I can still ski hard when we get the snow and to be totally honest nothing compares to skiing really fast in wind buffed powder in the alpine but for now I will take whatever I can get. 

 

Another aspect is skiing with my daughter. It's great to see her cruising with a shit eating grin and that will keep me going for sure. 

 

If I lived somewhere like the midwest or the tri-state area I wouldn't be skiing very much. I would probably make skydiving or something else my main focus. 

post #279 of 286
Nice!^
Maybe the thing to do is take a Europe trip. There's a whole world of mellow cruising and good food in spectacular scenery.
post #280 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Maybe the thing to do is take a Europe trip. There's a whole world of mellow cruising and good food in spectacular scenery.

 

Yeh, grew up doing that.

post #281 of 286

This is a great thread and it's kind of cool to reread it after skiing with some of the posters this winter.  One of the biggest hooks to remaining enthused about skiing into old age is the camaraderie.  It's no longer so much about conquering the mtn as it is about sharing a fun and beautiful activity with others.

post #282 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 

This is a great thread and it's kind of cool to reread it after skiing with some of the posters this winter.  One of the biggest hooks to remaining enthused about skiing into old age is the camaraderie.  It's no longer so much about conquering the mtn as it is about sharing a fun and beautiful activity with others.


I agree, because I ski with the same two or three guys all the time.  We joke around and bust each other when on the chair and enjoy the mountain as we ski.  At one time I was the top skier in the group but now the youngest guy is but we still have fun.  I have a goal to ski on my 70th birthday (not far away) after that I will set a new goal and see what happens.  The age of our group is one of the guys is over 70, I am second oldest, one is three years younger and the last is seven years younger.  The guy three years younger than I (the worst skier in the group) had a BAD leg break skiing a few years back but he came back.  Back in the early 1980's I broke both my heels off a ladder and have screws and plates in one heel but I also came back.  I always had trouble with boots and it is worst since my breaks but I just keep skiing.

post #283 of 286

@Jamesj , well said. 

When I was skiing a lot in Northern Michigan, the day always included friends, and quite often some kind of tailgating.  When your favorite activity includes a social climate, longevity is ensured. 

 

About the EpicSki Gatherings - We've had long debates about weather conditions and terrain available to the "advanced" skiers who attend these Get Togethers, but when it comes down to it, the thing that makes the biggest impact is timing and affordability.  If we can hold Gatherings when its cost effective so the attendance is good, the social aspects can be the hero of the event.  Great snow and awesome terrain are the icing on the cake. 

post #284 of 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

@Jamesj , well said. 

When I was skiing a lot in Northern Michigan, the day always included friends, and quite often some kind of tailgating.  When your favorite activity includes a social climate, longevity is ensured. 

 

About the EpicSki Gatherings - We've had long debates about weather conditions and terrain available to the "advanced" skiers who attend these Get Togethers, but when it comes down to it, the thing that makes the biggest impact is timing and affordability.  If we can hold Gatherings when its cost effective so the attendance is good, the social aspects can be the hero of the event.  Great snow and awesome terrain are the icing on the cake. 

 

And great snow is somewhere between random and a complete crapshoot, while awesome terrain is unavailable without sufficient base. Your cost effectiveness plan is much more reliable in getting people out to have fun.

 

Or, as @segbrown said to me at some point - "This is why I only do ski trips with people I would enjoy hanging out with, anyway."

post #285 of 286

I think keeping up an activity like skiing is all about motivation.  There are countless reasons to ski and countless reasons not to ski.  It is all about what is truly important to each person.  

 

Kudos to OldGoat86 who is still skiing on a regular basis at age 90!  I am almost 60, and for me, you are an inspiration!  

post #286 of 286

Correction:  the 90 year old skier is oldfool86-not OldGoat86.

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