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New Skier Looking at KneeBindings - Page 3

post #61 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

You should go in with a blindfold on and not take it off until you've decided on a boot based on fit, fit, and fit.

Deal.

post #62 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

Try setting your toe into the binding and then line up the heel with the heel cup and step in by pressuring the back of the boot cuff, basically lean back as you step down. It works pretty good, better than trying to stomp your way in.

So first thing today, tried stepping into the right binding first with the shifting my weight back once the toe was in. I felt a little stress on the front of my knee. Then did the same motion of shifting my weight back and that was fine. Later after our warm up break, I did the stump method with both, that was much easier. Toe in line up heal raise foot and stump it back down, the heal pop's right in the binding.  Works for me.

post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by freem221 View Post
 

If I like a boot in 100 flex, but I liked the color or design in a 120 enough to splurge the extra money, is there going to be a huge difference in flex? Enough to make me like one and hate the other? 

 

At your weight, 190-200 pounds, you will easily overflex a 100 flex boot.  If you came into our shop, either of us would be pulling out 120 flex boots for you to try.  If your boot is too soft for you, it will be more difficult to control your skis.  Of course that assumes you want to progress beyond being a terminal intermediate.

post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

So first thing today, tried stepping into the right binding first with the shifting my weight back once the toe was in. I felt a little stress on the front of my knee. Then did the same motion of shifting my weight back and that was fine. Later after our warm up break, I did the stump method with both, that was much easier. Toe in line up heal raise foot and stump it back down, the heal pop's right in the binding.  Works for me.

 

This is KB, right?  My wife has to reach down behind her and pull up on the left heel lever.  She doesn't mind it now, but it took a few trials.

post #65 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

 

At your weight, 190-200 pounds, you will easily overflex a 100 flex boot.  If you came into our shop, either of us would be pulling out 120 flex boots for you to try.  If your boot is too soft for you, it will be more difficult to control your skis.  Of course that assumes you want to progress beyond being a terminal intermediate.

 

I'll take that into consideration at the shop and look at the 120s then. Thanks!

post #66 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 

 

This is KB, right?  My wife has to reach down behind her and pull up on the left heel lever.  She doesn't mind it now, but it took a few trials.

Yes, the stump is much easier. Once she figures it out, I'm sure she will like it.

post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

Yes, the stump is much easier. Once she figures it out, I'm sure she will like it.

I don't know. She doesn't have a ton of strength in that leg (post ACL reconstruction).
post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post



I don't know. She doesn't have a ton of strength in that leg (post ACL reconstruction).

 



The stump is easy to do, it doesn't really take a lot of effort. Have her try it with the strong leg first.
post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post



I don't know. She doesn't have a ton of strength in that leg (post ACL reconstruction).

 



The stump is easy to do, it doesn't really take a lot of effort. Have her try it with the strong leg first.


Will give it a shot.  Thanks.

post #70 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by freem221 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

 

At your weight, 190-200 pounds, you will easily overflex a 100 flex boot.  If you came into our shop, either of us would be pulling out 120 flex boots for you to try.  If your boot is too soft for you, it will be more difficult to control your skis.  Of course that assumes you want to progress beyond being a terminal intermediate.

I'll take that into consideration at the shop and look at the 120s then. Thanks!
You're starting to get there but boots aren't like shopping for shoes. Ideally, you get advice from the boot store on what model boot would match your foot/lower leg type, flex for your size and type of skiing, and shell aize based on performance and days/year.

So far, flex, walk , color seem to be the primary characteristics you're looking for. Be careful you don't end up with a boot that looks great while walking but not so much skiIng. You may not know this though for a few years. Eg. You find out 2 years later your boots are really a shell size or two too large.

Have you gotten any advice on what boots match you?
post #71 of 71
freem221, have you said where you ski ? may be we can send you to a great boot fitter.

To expand on what Tog said, the boot fitter will ask you about your skiing, he'll inspect the shoes you walked in with, hint wear old shoes that you like, he'll check the alignment of your lower legs, inspect the bones in your feet, check your ankl flex. Then recommend a few boots to try.

If he dosen't do all of those, walk away. Boot are that important. My fitter or his guy's do that everytime I buy boots. I've been going to the same guy for over 20 years.
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