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Ski pivots/fishtails under foot while skiing straight - cause? - Page 2

post #31 of 51

I've broken two kinds of Sollies, actually, way prior to the Z12's, which I've never run. Nothing lately. Others swear by them. 

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Light, but prone to break. The only bindings I've ever broken and I'm not an aggressive skier. Nor am I the only one who has broken them.

 



Nothing is perfect. I'm an agressive skier, never had any problems with any binding. The Z12Ti have over 100 day's on them, they have been perfect.

Two weeks ago a buddies wife just got new Volkls with a system binding. A couple day's late she had a fall and the binding didn't release. They had them tested and found out that one od the pieces would pass the test. No matter what it was set at. DIN 5 or 5.5 or 6 it would only release at 6.5
The shop replaced the binding, end of story.

You can always find somebody who got a bad item new in the box. It's only an issue when you lots of people get the same item with the same issue. That's why GM is still recalling cars for bad ignition switches.
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

@GeorgeBMac

 

To ski straights well you learned everything is sequence or didn't progress.  It wasn't a choice.  Even when you did it was always hard work.  On shaped a lot of intermediates look better than they are because the ski makes it easy.  To truly progress to advanced/expert you pretty well learn everything that we had to learn on straight skis (only we had to learn it just to ski reasonably well).

 

@mdf

 

You likely had everything just not the commitment/confidence it took, shaped skis just made it easier and once the commitment/confidence  was learned the step back was easier because the skill was there originally just that last bit was missing.

 

Cheers to you both,

 

G

Darn!  You are right about the sequence.   I had never thought of it that way, but yes, that brings back memories of where I formed the basis for my skiing:  a race camp on Mt. Hood in the summer of 1980:   They took us through each progression/sequence as you approached the gate, ran through the gate and came back out to prepare for the next gate....   1, 2, 3....   It was a highly structured sequence of multiple parts and events...     And, it is why I can comfortably ski a Kastle RX today -- even though the ski is way over my head and abilities...  

 

At this point the sequence is so automatic that I don't think of it as a sequence, but it very much is.  It is a very conscious sequence of motions.  And, if I remove the conscious control and let the body control the sequence (or lack of...), bad things begin to happen.

... Thanks for the illumination!

 

It really explains why every time I take those skis into a shop to be worked on, I get comments about it being too much ski to ski on -- yet I love them!

post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 

I just wanted to thank everybody for generating so much discussion and information on this subject!  Lots of good stuff there I can learn from!  Glad I found this forum! :-)

 

- Tim

post #35 of 51
Your welcome, that's what most of us are here for, to help out and get you to enjoy skiing more. Remember, the better you get, the more fun this becomes.
post #36 of 51
Kuuuul! Another 'you have to learn on straight skis to be a real skier' thread.

I learned on straight skis. I'm thankful that my son will not.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Kuuuul! Another 'you have to learn on straight skis to be a real skier' thread.

I learned on straight skis. I'm thankful that my son will not.


I don't think that's the case.  Just a little different learning progression from old compared to new.  The only difference is really in the middle and how you good you think you are and aren't.   Ultimately, you still have to learn it all to get to be your best and at that point it doesn't matter.

post #38 of 51

Straightlining is overrated.

 

Sure a skier can declare blues and cat tracks boring and just make some eleven tracks.

 

I entertain myself changing edges quickly taking the elevens and making dollar signs.

 

This also puts more edge down preserving momentum instead of just dragging the tails behind.

post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post


I don't think that's the case.  Just a little different learning progression from old compared to new.  The only difference is really in the middle and how you good you think you are and aren't.   Ultimately, you still have to learn it all to get to be your best and at that point it doesn't matter.

No need to learn on straight skis in this day and age. With time on skis and some good coaching, my son won't miss a thing in his development. I doubt he'll use a rotary phone either. wink.gif
post #40 of 51

For me anyway, making elevens, even dollar signs, anymore just gets boring after about 2 runs. That's why I've developed such a liking for bumps. One can ski the same run all day long and not lose interest. Also seems to take care of that pesky pivot/fishtail problem. (See? No hijack!)

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post


I don't think that's the case.  Just a little different learning progression from old compared to new.  The only difference is really in the middle and how you good you think you are and aren't.   Ultimately, you still have to learn it all to get to be your best and at that point it doesn't matter.

No need to learn on straight skis in this day and age. With time on skis and some good coaching, my son won't miss a thing in his development. I doubt he'll use a rotary phone either. wink.gif

Hah. I have a friend who still has a rotary phone, from the 50's, in their summer house. I had to teach these 6-10 yr old girls how to use it. They ran away before we finished.

I love the straight ski thing. You know, a lot of people never got very good back in the day too. It's not like everyone was Ingemar Stenmark.

post #42 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Kuuuul! Another 'you have to learn on straight skis to be a real skier' thread.

I learned on straight skis. I'm thankful that my son will not.


Ha! Well, that's why I got the straight skis initially - about 17 years ago when I first learned to ski (on a couple of used, straight 180cm skis I bought at "Play it Again Sports"), most people I knew were starting to transition to shaped skis.

 

I can't recall if someone told me I "should" start off on straight skis or not, but I knew that it was harder, and I also reasoned that since people had been using them for years, and spoke of the wonders of the shaped skis, it must follow that learning on straight skis would make me work harder, and appreciate shaped skis when I finally went to them.

 

So that's why I chose them.  Just didn't end up transitioning to shaped ones until now (well, in the near future :-) ).

 

- Tim

post #43 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


No need to learn on straight skis in this day and age. With time on skis and some good coaching, my son won't miss a thing in his development. I doubt he'll use a rotary phone either. wink.gif

 

What? Nooooo! You NEED to learn on a rotary phone to be a REAL telephone user! ;-)

 

- Tim

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


No need to learn on straight skis in this day and age. With time on skis and some good coaching, my son won't miss a thing in his development. I doubt he'll use a rotary phone either. wink.gif

 

What? Nooooo! You NEED to learn on a rotary phone to be a REAL telephone user! ;-)

 

- Tim

You need to actually remember a telephone number to be a real telephone user. Not have it stored in some memory chip.

post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
 
 

 

What? Nooooo! You NEED to learn on a rotary phone to be a REAL telephone user! ;-)

 

- Tim

 

Wait - you had rotary phones?   You didn't just hit the hook switch 10 times to dial 0?    :eek

post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

Hah. I have a friend who still has a rotary phone, from the 50's, in their summer house. I had to teach these 6-10 yr old girls how to use it. They ran away before we finished.

I love the straight ski thing. You know, a lot of people never got very good back in the day too. It's not like everyone was Ingemar Stenmark.


Those same people on shaped skis would actually be pretty good. ;)

post #47 of 51

Or, maybe not. Arrow? Indian?

post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

Hah. I have a friend who still has a rotary phone, from the 50's, in their summer house. I had to teach these 6-10 yr old girls how to use it. They ran away before we finished.

I love the straight ski thing. You know, a lot of people never got very good back in the day too. It's not like everyone was Ingemar Stenmark.


Those same people on shaped skis would actually be pretty good. ;)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post
 

Or, maybe not. Arrow? Indian?

 

Well, as the world turned, the Indians complained that the new arrows were unstable.

post #49 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

You need to actually remember a telephone number to be a real telephone user. Not have it stored in some memory chip.

 

Yeah, I've noticed that - I used to remember the numbers of all my friends, pretty much; now I only remember mine and that of my oldest friend.

 

I wonder if that's a bad thing or not?

 

- Tim

post #50 of 51

Ah...But the good ones could shoot them straight.

post #51 of 51

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned binding position. I ski my Kastles 1cm forward and find that they will wobble just a little bit if I am cooking the runout to get back up a hill or something. Yes, definitely the lesser weighted or less flat foot. But it isn't really annoying. For fun and curiosity I pushed a pair of Head Rev 80 2cm forward. They are already forward positioned compared to Kastle. Now those wobbled and chattered back and forth against each other so badly I laughed my tail off. And then set them back on the line. 

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