or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Snowboarding Discussions, Gear and Instruction › What problems do you face with your snowboarding gear?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What problems do you face with your snowboarding gear?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Do you have some fitting problems with your snowboarding equipment? if yes what are they? and what do you think could be a solution?

 

please answer! you would help me a lot!

post #2 of 5

That is an interesting question. I guess I have gone through a lot of different gear and sort of learned the hard way about what works for me (and what I would recommend to others). I definitely feel like I have had/used gear in the past that has negatively affected my riding.

 

In my opinion (and I figure others will agree) correct fitting boots are the most important piece of equipment you can get. I rode for many years in uncomfortable boots with sloppy heel pockets before I knew any better... You should find the smallest size boot that fits comfortably and has zero heel lift. You should not be able to pick your heels up at all when trying to stand on your tip toes. The boots should also be comfortable. Usually they will pack out just a bit which is why I said get the smallest size that fits comfortably. I am currently using the ride lasso (2 seasons) - I previously used the DC judge which I LOVED but the boa system failed on 2 pairs of boots (over 4 seasons and it has since been redesigned)

 

Ride a soft(er) board... I rode stiff(er) boards for a lot of years. I feel that they can really hold your riding back while offering minimal benefit when going fast. From my experience with good technique you can make carved turns at speed just as well on a soft freestyle board as you can on some super stiff board. The softer board will be easier to make shorter radius turns with. It will also be easier to control and maneuver when going slow(er). You should pick the board so that your weight falls into the middle or low end of the recommended weight range from the manufacturer.

 

I have had a very positive experience with Burton bindings. They are light and comfortable and the ratchets always works great. Once again you want the best boot to binding fit, so selecting the smallest size binding that fits your boots is a good idea. For instance I wear a size 10 and I use a burton medium binding. A large would also work but the boot to binding fit would not be ideal. I have used older ride bindings and union bindings (on friends boards) with stickey ratchets which really got on my nerves. I would avoid bindings with ratchets that stick (i think newer union and ride bindings have fixed this issue). I would recommend a comfortable lightweight binding that fits your boot well. You should also match the stiffness to the board (IE dont put a soft(er) bindings on a stiff(er) board - I have done this before I knew any better and it is not ideal)

post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiphy View Post
 

Do you have some fitting problems with your snowboarding equipment? if yes what are they? and what do you think could be a solution?

 

please answer! you would help me a lot!


what's your problem?

 

my main issue is heel lift (due to skinny calves).... so this season, I'm going to try the Instaprint The Eliminator Custom Tongue.  My boots are already fitted and have custom insoles...  heel lift is only an issue when I'm hitting the moguls

 

other than that... I have a camber board & a Camber-Rocker-Camber board....

08 Burton T6 with Triad bindings

13 Burton Sherlock with Malavita bindings

08 DC Judge boots.

 

A stiffer board will also wear your legs out much faster....

 

the softer board... the edge grip isn't as good as camber, but you can adjust for it (and my CRC board , which is purposely shorter for me, it nicer to toss around in the moguls.)

post #4 of 5

I concur with comments about boots. Heel lift results in my greatest challenge. My toes are sore all Winter because I wear boots that are pushing the limits of being too small. Well, and I walk around a lot, thus I am not in a stance to relieve the pressure at my toes. The best boot I ever had for this was, like Caleb, the DC Judge with the Bravo liners. It had the pump-up, heel holding bladders. They were great and never failed me! I switched to the Allegiance (I think) for the dual Boa system. In every pair of DC boots I ever owned, I had the soles come off the boot. I have now abandoned DC boots. Today I ride (and still walk a lot) in Deeluxe Spark. I experience little heel lift and they are great boots but my toes are still sore. I advocate the dual boa system. My Sparks do not have it and I think heel lift would be minimized with that system.

post #5 of 5

Bryan if the Judge fit your foot/ankle well you should try on the Ride Lasso sometime. They have a different dual boa system one boa for the shell and one boa that tightens the instep of the boot. It works really well. Mine have about 40 days on them and they look nearly new.

 

I went through 2 pairs of the 2011/2012 judge... where they redesigned the lower boa to the flap (constrictor?) system. I liked the idea and they fit me PERFECTLY. But one of the lower boas failed (jammed up and wouldnt release) after 40 days on one pair and about 60 days on the 2nd pair. It really sucked because the boots were still in excellent condition. They looked great no tears or bad wear marks. They have since gone back to the traditional focus dual boa design, but they changed the fit for the worse in my opinion.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Snowboarding Discussions, Gear and Instruction › What problems do you face with your snowboarding gear?