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Advice needed for women's skis [for beginner/intermediate on Midwest groomers]

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I hope I'm not beating a dead horse here. I'm looking for some skis for my girlfriend. She's a beginner trasitioning to intermediate, and ready for her own gear. She's athletic, 5'7", and about 160lbs. I'm kind of limited with how much I can spend, so I've been looking for sale items. I found a pair of Rossignol Temptation 76 womens specific in 156cm for a good price, and an even better deal on some Rossignol Experience 83 mens skis in 160cm. I've read all the info on womens specific skis. Some say they are more forgiving, easier to control, and require less energy to drive than a mens ski. Others say they're not needed, and are nothing more than a softer version of a mens ski with small differences. I'd appreciate any advice or opinions on which ski you would pick, and why?
post #2 of 8
where do you ski and what kind runs and type of terrain she enjoys?

in general these skis seem a little on the short side for her, the 83 at 160 might work, but I'm afraid she won't takelong to overpower the 156cm temptation
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adm9875 View Post

I hope I'm not beating a dead horse here. I'm looking for some skis for my girlfriend. She's a beginner trasitioning to intermediate, and ready for her own gear. She's athletic, 5'7", and about 160lbs. I'm kind of limited with how much I can spend, so I've been looking for sale items. I found a pair of Rossignol Temptation 76 womens specific in 156cm for a good price, and an even better deal on some Rossignol Experience 83 mens skis in 160cm. I've read all the info on womens specific skis. Some say they are more forgiving, easier to control, and require less energy to drive than a mens ski. Others say they're not needed, and are nothing more than a softer version of a mens ski with small differences. I'd appreciate any advice or opinions on which ski you would pick, and why?

 

Welcome!

 

First of all, some more information on how she skis would be helpful but  about the Experience 83, the Experience and Temptation lines are same construction so there's no need to worry about mens/women's in this particular line. 

 

Give us more info on where she skis, what kind of skis she's been on this far and what kind of terrain she likes . 

post #4 of 8

More important than anything about skis is, does she have her own boots?  A properly fitted boot is much more important than any ski.  Skis are more glamorous and get all the press, but what pretty much everyone here will tell you is that boots are the place to start when acquiring gear.


Edited by mtcyclist - 1/4/15 at 8:37pm
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
We mainly ski groomers in the Midwest, with one trip out west per season. She's learning quickly, but her skill level is still on the beginner side. She's just now getting into trying to carve her turns. This is my 3rd year skiing, and I out grew my first pair of skis in one season. They were skinny noodles, but I learned a lot on them. Wanted something for her that is a little more versatile, and she can grow into without being too demanding. I know what you mean with boots being the most important part. I had to buy a new pair when I was out West last year, because my first pair were way too big. It was great going to an actual boot fitter. In the Midwest the closest decent ski shop is about 2hrs away, and even then their selection is extremely limited. We tend to make a lot of internet purchases. I have a pair of boots that should be here tomorrow for her to try on. I ordered the Technica Ten.2 85W in a size smaller than her normal shoes. Have to wait and see.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adm9875 View Post

We mainly ski groomers in the Midwest, with one trip out west per season. She's learning quickly, but her skill level is still on the beginner side. She's just now getting into trying to carve her turns. This is my 3rd year skiing, and I out grew my first pair of skis in one season. They were skinny noodles, but I learned a lot on them. Wanted something for her that is a little more versatile, and she can grow into without being too demanding. I know what you mean with boots being the most important part. I had to buy a new pair when I was out West last year, because my first pair were way too big. It was great going to an actual boot fitter. In the Midwest the closest decent ski shop is about 2hrs away, and even then their selection is extremely limited. We tend to make a lot of internet purchases. I have a pair of boots that should be here tomorrow for her to try on. I ordered the Technica Ten.2 85W in a size smaller than her normal shoes. Have to wait and see.


I won't make a comment on that boot for her because I haven't seen her feet, but .....ordering boots on line is not usually a good idea. 

 

 

On to skis.  part of the reason you made great progress is because you were on good skis to learn good technique on.  Something similar would be good for her so she can make progress too. 

 

I'd be inclined to suggest skis like the K2 Potion 76 or Blizzard Viva 7.7 (something in that category) for a great learning ski.  She may need to replace it with something more advance in a year but that's money well spent for being on the right ski. 

post #7 of 8

When I started skiing 3 seasons ago, I got boots first and I think (like others have stated above) that properly-fitted boots are paramount to a beginner's enjoyment of skiing. They helped me progress much quicker and gave me great control of my skis. The first skis I got were Atomic Affinity Pures - on the recommendation of my local ski shop. They were great skis when I was transitioning out of beginner to intermediate, inspired a lot of confidence, made turns easy, allowed me to venture on steeper terrain and even explore some powder. I can't speak highly enough of these skis. They are often overlooked as good beginner-intermediate skis, but generally I don't think the Affinity line gets the credit it deserves. They also come with adjustable bindings and are easy on the pocket book (you can find some on eBay, levelninesports etc)...I've since gotten Kenjas and love them, but still take out my Pures sometimes - especially early and late season, because they are such fun and easy skis. 

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by albertanskigirl View Post
 

When I started skiing 3 seasons ago, I got boots first and I think (like others have stated above) that properly-fitted boots are paramount to a beginner's enjoyment of skiing. They helped me progress much quicker and gave me great control of my skis. 

^^^^^^^This!

 

Trying to fit your girlfriend is akin to trying to teach her to ski.  Even if you're a ski instructor it still isn't a good idea, unless you don't value your relationship, and an even worse idea if you're not an instructor.  I fitted my wife and son with new boots this year, along with custom footbeds, but I do that on a nearly daily basis, so I have a pretty good idea what I'm doing.  How far are you from Bloomington, MN or Chicago?  If you have a trip planned  somewhere "out west" this season, I would advise you to wait until you get there and get her boots from someone who knows what they're doing.

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