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Old boots with new generation of bindings-safety issue

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I have boots form 80s(brand is Alpina). Can I use them with new generation of bindings (my new bindnigas are EL 10 (ELAN))? The technician in the ski shop spend a lot of time to adjust bindings, but at the end I think he was not very sure that everything is OK. What is your opinion, in general is possible- safety- to use  boots from 80s with modern bindings?  

Best regards

post #2 of 15
30 year old boots don't seem safe to me. Plastic fatigue is real, I wouldn't risk it.
post #3 of 15

Nillion makes a valid point.  That being said, your boots are built to DIN standards and would be good for any modern post DIN binding.  Not sure why the tech seemed to be taking ao much timetime.  Did he have a boot sole wear template to ensure that your toes and heels were still within spec?  Perhaps your bsl was just between forward pressure indicator marks, i.e. just barely enough and almost out of indicator range.  If that's the case, he probably tested both to give you the safest and best performing final setting.  With many bindings that don't use the worn gear screw for forward pressure, (they use the slot and key type), forward pressure can take more time to dial in.

Bob

post #4 of 15

So long as the boots are worn down and the fit looks good visually I would still use them, provided they pass the plastique fatigue test (i.e. smack 'em against the floor and be sure to flex them a few times before you go up the hill. 

 

My wife's cheap rear entry boots broke in the parking lot walking to the hill from the car.  My antique Koflachs are still going strong.  Some plastic boots last longer than others.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

I am afraid because, the binding(heel) does not cover completely plastic part at heel of the boot. At the surface is distance between boot and binding. You can see on images:

post #6 of 15

Can you show us a picture of the forward pressure indicator (and adjustment screw)?  If it's a marker/marker clone it's the screw at the back that moves in and out as the binding is closed and released with a boot in it.  If it's a Tyrolia it could be tab at the back that has to be within a range, other bindings have a range indicated on the side.  For all of them, moving the binding by closing it on a boot moves the marker within a range.  Remember adjust with boot out, check with boot in.

 

Also, is the nub of the boot touching the back of the binding?

 

If those two things are OK, I would not worry about the fact that the binding is only touching the nub.

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

Ghost, if I understand you correctly  this should be the picture of the forward pressure indicator (and adjustment screw):

As I can see  nub of the boot is touching the back of the binding. Is another way to check it, or just with seeing?
​I am afraid about opportunity one of skis release from the binding during a ski.   

post #8 of 15

That is the pressure indicator, although perhaps not the adjusting screw.  If I'm seeing the photo correctly, you are at the edge of the range, and the binding housing moved back so that it lined up with the last scribe on the range when you closed it down in the boot.  If the boot is pushing the binding back, it must be touching it.

 

Looks like you have a binding similar to my Tyrolia bindings and likely have to lift that tab on that binding to slide the heel fore and aft, lock it into one of several set positions.  You may have it set at the most forward position, and that barely puts you in the range. 

 

If it were my binding, I would say "in" is "in" and leave it at that.  I would ski that binding as is if there were not other more forward position, or if the next position moved you all the way to the other end of the range (not likley).  It looks good to go.

post #9 of 15

That forward pressure is not set correctly (if the photo was taken with the boot in the binding), it needs to be tighter than that. If you feel comfortable taking personal responsibility for yourself then all you need to do is: take the boot out of the binding, lift that metal tab  (the tab with small lines etched in it) with a flat blade screw driver and move the heel forward one set of holes (the side by side holes in the metal base plate under the tab). If those instructions seem too complex or if you do not feel comfortable taking charge of your own safety, then bring it to a more experienced ski tech.

post #10 of 15

It does look as though there should be more positions forward of where it is currently set; you are almost at the back of the track.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by frojd View Post
 

I have boots form 80s(brand is Alpina). Can I use them with new generation of bindings (my new bindnigas are EL 10 (ELAN))? The technician in the ski shop spend a lot of time to adjust bindings, but at the end I think he was not very sure that everything is OK. What is your opinion, in general is possible- safety- to use  boots from 80s with modern bindings?  

Best regards

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

That forward pressure is not set correctly (if the photo was taken with the boot in the binding), it needs to be tighter than that. If you feel comfortable taking personal responsibility for yourself then all you need to do is: take the boot out of the binding, lift that metal tab  (the tab with small lines etched in it) with a flat blade screw driver and move the heel forward one set of holes (the side by side holes in the metal base plate under the tab). If those instructions seem too complex or if you do not feel comfortable taking charge of your own safety, then bring it to a more experienced ski tech.


I'm just having a little trouble understanding why a ski tech would have trouble moving a tyrolia type binding one click forward of the current location.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

 


I'm just having a little trouble understanding why a ski tech would have trouble moving a tyrolia type binding one click forward of the current location.


He may be unhappy with the fit of the boot in the binding and is just saying no.  It's up to the tech obviously, he may have his reasons.  The owner however can move it forward as mentioned if he chooses to. Same with using 30 year old boots which is kinda tricky in my opinion.  I know the plastic gets brittle as time goes by but if the owner is confident it'll be ok then so be it.

post #13 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by frojd View Post
 

I am afraid because, the binding(heel) does not cover completely plastic part at heel of the boot. At the surface is distance between boot and binding. You can see on images:

The two spaces that you show should occur on different bindings because the toe and heel should only engage, not the shell of the boot.  If the shell engages you may have something wrong with the boot or binding.   As to the correct forward pressure, don't know you binding well enough to comment.

post #14 of 15

Tell the truth, given the age of your boots, you are likely on borrowed time.  Last thing you want to have happen is taking a spill and finding out that it wasn't the binding that release, but the boot broke and now you have to get down on one ski with the other in hand looking to buy new boots at the bottom.  Look at this thread for more pictures.

 

 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/104826/boots-too-old

 

Broken Boot 1.jpg

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much for answers. I was skiing last two days and everything is ok. Also I plan to change boots probably at the end of season. Is no opportunity to change binding forward. As I can see bindings are on the maximum positions. I think that in the past standards for boots size was different but I am not sure. 

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