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Jumping Into Tech Bindings

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Been using Marker Tours for the past 4 years, just got some heavier skis - Moment Exit World 184cm 115mm at the waist and I wanna throw some Dynafit Techs on 'em. Current boot is the old Dynafit Titan (white, red & black)

 

Im having a hard time choosing between all the options but am leaning toward the TLT Radical ST (brakes), TLT Speed Radical (no brakes) & Speed Superlights (no brake, no strap). Im 5'11" 170 and usually ski a DIN around 8 so the beasts arent for me.

 

I guess the biggest issue is that Ive never used a no brake binding, I dont typically pop out of my skis in powder and if I do they typically stay put, but having my shiny new ski go down the hill in the back country is a concern. The no brake TLTs do come with a strap but I feel like that will bring me back to my snowboard days when strapping in got to be a tiresome routine...maybe its not such a big deal. The other issue with the TLT Radical w/brakes is the sizes, they come in 110 and 130...my ski is 115 so 130 would be far too big.

 

I guess Im looking for two points of feedback, will the TLT w/brakes at 130 be too large when laid down on edge?

 

Are runaway skis a valid concern? Is the strap pretty simple and easy to use?

 

As always any feedback is appreciated, thanks in advance.

post #2 of 23

I think the boot guides on the radicals would make it a bit easier to jump in, but most people seem to struggle with stepping in, so good luck with that. 

 

110mm brakes will fit 115 just fine. might need a little stretch of scraping, but no issue. Also fully expect the brakes to not stop the ski on a steep slope. 

post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by merovius View Post

I guess Im looking for two points of feedback, will the TLT w/brakes at 130 be too large when laid down on edge?

No, we're only talking about 7.5 mm per side here. But as pointed out above, 110s will work as well.
Quote:
Are runaway skis a valid concern?

IME, yes.
Quote:
Is the strap pretty simple and easy to use?

I guess so, but IMO the main reason to use the strap is to save weight...which isn't that much.
post #4 of 23

Would avoid the strap if you can and go for brakes.  A friend broke his fibula when hit in the leg by his strapped ski.  Was a low speed, pretty innocuous fall but put a damper on the end of his ski trip.

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


I guess so, but IMO the main reason to use the strap is to save weight...which isn't that much.

 

I have the Speed Radicals with the strap, hasn't been a problem, but the main reason I bought them wasn't weight but that the binding delta is a little lower than the other Dynafits. (And they were $75 cheaper.)

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

I have the Speed Radicals with the strap, hasn't been a problem, but the main reason I bought them wasn't weight but that the binding delta is a little lower than the other Dynafits. (And they were $75 cheaper.)

Same here
Got the b&d ski gear straps for em to make sure the don't run away while giving me a longer strap with an Avy fuse

Brakes in the backcountry won't stop a ski from disappearing under snow and taking off but might be nice to have if you are in the resort
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by near nyquist View Post

Brakes in the backcountry won't stop a ski from disappearing under snow and taking off but might be nice to have if you are in the resort

 

Maybe, but they can keep your skis from taking off down the hill like a scorched cat when you set them down at the top of a mountain after you rip skins, or when they fall over after you shove them in the snow to take pictures or whatever.  IME, anyway.  

 

And brakes won't beat you up after you take a tumbling beater fall and release.  

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Maybe, but they can keep your skis from taking off down the hill like a scorched cat when you set them down at the top of a mountain after you rip skins, or when they fall over after you shove them in the snow to take pictures or whatever.  IME, anyway.  

And brakes won't beat you up after you take a tumbling beater fall and release.  
If you use the b & d strap setup this is not an issue

Kind of like a retractable springy thingy with fuses on the end to break under high tension

The dynafit strap that comes with em is way too short for my taste
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by near nyquist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Maybe, but they can keep your skis from taking off down the hill like a scorched cat when you set them down at the top of a mountain after you rip skins, or when they fall over after you shove them in the snow to take pictures or whatever.  IME, anyway.  

And brakes won't beat you up after you take a tumbling beater fall and release.  

 

If you use the b & d strap setup this is not an issue

Kind of like a retractable springy thingy with fuses on the end to break under high tension

The dynafit strap that comes with em is way too short for my taste

 

B&D straps don't help with the things I mentioned in my first lines.  

 

But my point is that straps aren't a no-brainer, there are fairly good reasons to at least consider brakes vs. straps.  I've seen skis set down when people are clicking in head downhill.  if you're always in a soft wide spot when you do that, or are confident that things like I've already mentioned won't happen, go with straps.  

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

B&D straps don't help with the things I mentioned in my first lines.  

But my point is that straps aren't a no-brainer, there are fairly good reasons to at least consider brakes vs. straps.  I've seen skis set down when people are clicking in head downhill.  if you're always in a soft wide spot when you do that, or are confident that things like I've already mentioned won't happen, go with straps.  
I use my straps all the time really never have to take em off

But the brakes do help if one is the forgetful type
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by near nyquist View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

B&D straps don't help with the things I mentioned in my first lines.  

But my point is that straps aren't a no-brainer, there are fairly good reasons to at least consider brakes vs. straps.  I've seen skis set down when people are clicking in head downhill.  if you're always in a soft wide spot when you do that, or are confident that things like I've already mentioned won't happen, go with straps.  

I use my straps all the time really never have to take em off

That's great if you never have to put your skis on your pack to climb, or if you can take your skins off and put them on without removing your skis, or if you never take them off to have something to eat or drink, or take pictures or enjoy the view.
Quote:
But the brakes do help if one is the forgetful type

Or if you forget that touring often involves the things I just mentioned. I mean, maybe they're fine if you remember to stick to golf courses...
post #12 of 23
I remember that I liked having brakes when I was clicking in at the top of this:
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

I remember that I liked having brakes when I was clicking in at the top of this:
 
This^^  I have Speeds on 2 pair of skis, verticals on 1, and radicals on 3.  On my skis w/o brakes I always us a B&D leash; if I'm doing some serious climbing I use a leash with the skis with brakes.  If I need to put on/take off ski crampons or skings, the leashes are great.  Every time I use my speeds I wish i had gotten bindings with brakes.  Just easier when you want to get in and out and most of the time you wouldn't need the leash.  Yes, runaway skis are a valid concern--I've had both run away at the same time leaving my quite a loss as to what to do next LOL
post #14 of 23

Even with brakes.... beware the runaway ski when transitioning from tour to downhill and the brakes are locked up (and you have just removed the skins)...... 

 

 

Only went a couple of hundred metres before the tree stopped the ski from going about a kilometre further (and a couple of hundred metres of vertical lost) :eek

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post
 

Would avoid the strap if you can and go for brakes.  A friend broke his fibula when hit in the leg by his strapped ski.  Was a low speed, pretty innocuous fall but put a damper on the end of his ski trip.

 

That is a very good point and something I had not considered, thank you for that. If I do drop off and pop a ski on impact I certainly dont want it smacking me in the face.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

 

I have the Speed Radicals with the strap, hasn't been a problem, but the main reason I bought them wasn't weight but that the binding delta is a little lower than the other Dynafits. (And they were $75 cheaper.)

 

Tbh Ive never made delta/ramp a major concern but generally favor lower ramp, GS turns down icy steeps isnt what Im setting up for.

 

Just how much lower is it?

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by merovius View Post
 

 

 

Tbh Ive never made delta/ramp a major concern but generally favor lower ramp, GS turns down icy steeps isnt what Im setting up for.

 

Just how much lower is it?

 

Read this

 

I added the 6mm shim to the toe pieces, also. Things have felt pretty good, although one day I was losing my left ski a bit in right turns. Some minor adjustments (ie, concentrating on things more)  and it was better. (That was on resort groomers, btw, while checking out equipment.)

post #17 of 23

The B&D "telephone cord" allows the ski to slide a ways from you and is to be used with a breakaway clip in case of an avalanche (or just getting well stuck)http://www.bndskigear.com/skileash.html.

 

B&D also makes shims to go under the toe of the Dynafit binding to reduce delta angle.  They come in different heights and there is advice on the website from Wildsnow.com.  Different bindings call for different shims to reduce delta to some pre-selected angle; I have the shims on all my skis.

 

Disclaimer: I have no relation to B&D other than being a customer of their shims, leashes, and ski crampons.

 

The link segbrown ^^^ posted is the definitive guide on the subject of shims but obviously one has to take into consideration binding delta, boot ramp, boot length, and skier preference.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post
 

Would avoid the strap if you can and go for brakes.  A friend broke his fibula when hit in the leg by his strapped ski.  Was a low speed, pretty innocuous fall but put a damper on the end of his ski trip.

Not to make light of the consequeces, but I think the odds of getting your leg broken or injured from your ski in a fall are not very high. In the days before brakes, I only know of a couple of instances of people getting injured from their own skis. It never happened to me and I took plenty of headers with runaway straps on my skis. One of my friends got beaned once in his entire junior racing career. It just didn't happen very often. I have Speed Radicals and I chose the B&D straps mainly because I wanted to be connected to my ski when transitioning from climbing to skiing after I take my skis off my pack. I thought about brakes but I'm not very certain the brakes will stop a ski from taking off if you don't keep control of it on steeper slopes. In the end I guess it's personal choice and what you feel comfortable with.

post #19 of 23

This subject comes up often, and there is no right answer.

 

You are probably a little less likely to get hurt with brakes, but not necessarily.

You are probably a little less likely not to lose a ski with a leash, but not necessarily.

The BND option mitigates some of the negatives of leashes.

If you travel in crevassed areas, leashes are a must.  Try hanging from a harness and removing and securing your ski- first with a standard leash, next with a BND cord.  

 

I have, and like, both brakes and leashes.  If brakes were better at stopping skis on hard snow, I would only use leashes in crevassed areas- on average a few days every other year.  But, I ski in places where losing a ski would be a huge problem, and ski in conditions where a Dynafit brake won't stop a ski, so mostly I mostly use leashes.  xcept when I use brakes.

post #20 of 23

If you haven't bought them already... there are a number of other options for tech... Vipec, Ion, and the new King Pin(which so far I really like) all of which are 1/2 the weight and more of your Barron/Dukes

 

Far as brakes .. dynafit brakes suck ..lift serve or otherwise (at least all the ones I have do) I supplement them with B&D leashes ...

post #21 of 23

The difference in uphill ease from using Dynafits or other pintech bindings far outweighs the fiddly factor.  Take some time practicing stepping in, and do it in the comfort of your house.  Figure out what works best for you.  Those who try to merely center the foot and press down at the toe will find it more frustrating.  I tip the boot toward the little toe side's pin for orientation and partial engagement (to line it up), then roll it to center and step down -- that works best for me.  Trying to dead-center the boot toe is likely to take much longer to dial in as habit, and I think the "Dynafiddle" tag comes mostly from trying that more frustrating route.

 

As to brake vs leash, each has plus and minus. 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkuphill View Post
 

The difference in uphill ease from using Dynafits or other pintech bindings far outweighs the fiddly factor.  Take some time practicing stepping in, and do it in the comfort of your house.  Figure out what works best for you.  Those who try to merely center the foot and press down at the toe will find it more frustrating.  I tip the boot toward the little toe side's pin for orientation and partial engagement (to line it up), then roll it to center and step down -- that works best for me.  Trying to dead-center the boot toe is likely to take much longer to dial in as habit, and I think the "Dynafiddle" tag comes mostly from trying that more frustrating route.

 

As to brake vs leash, each has plus and minus.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxNqYLN3Ji0

 

The above tip was helpful for stepping into Dynafits, especially in the field.

 

If the link doesn't work, Google "Backcountry Skiing Canada Putting on Skis on Steep Slope."

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by hespeler View Post
 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxNqYLN3Ji0

 

The above tip was helpful for stepping into Dynafits, especially in the field.

 

If the link doesn't work, Google "Backcountry Skiing Canada Putting on Skis on Steep Slope."


Nice video; I hadn't seen that technique before.  A couple of others:  Dynafit often puts marks on the toe of the boot to help you line up with the pin; you could do the same thing with other boots and a sharpie.  Dynafit toe fittings actually help guide the pins to the divots, go gently and get the feel; newer dynafit bindings have a post to stop the boot from going too far forward--again, go easy and feel for it.  Clean the snow from around the binding toe piece by snapping it in and out.  Knock or scrape the snow off the toe of your boot if the snow is really sticky.  In difficulty situations, as in the video, you can also stick the tail of the ski into the snow to hold the ski steady and leve.  If you have short skis, you can point the ski uphill (letting the brake hold it in place).  On the level, or where you can make the snow level beneath the ski, it is, of course, much easier.

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