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Rock skis recommendations

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Apparantly, I need a pair of rock skis due to low snow cover at my home resort. I need to be able to keep skiing even during times of low snow cover.

 

What should I look for in a pair of skis that I don't mind getting all dinged on the bases.


I ski Line skis, 174cm in length.


What would you recommend for buying rock skis?

(Not looking for particular brands, but general information, like "get the same length" or "find a cheap pair at Goodwill" or other general information. I'll be buying used so won't be able to be brand/model specific.)

post #2 of 23

God made PTEX for a reason.  Go ski your regular skis and enjoy them.  Thumbs Up  

post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

God made PTEX for a reason.  Go ski your regular skis and enjoy them.  Thumbs Up  

funny but somewhat true! All I can figure is not so beat up that the bindings are in question. Depending on cost, you may just save the cash, use the Lines and if bunged up too bad use the cash towards new moving the Lines to rock.

 

lots of demo's out there cheap (depending on your scale) on line or up NW near ya. for rock though

post #4 of 23

Rock skis are always the second newest pair of skis you own.

 

You don't want to be locked into bindings you can't trust, no matter how badly the skis are being beat up, as Pete mentions.

post #5 of 23

IMHO, most rocks (unless jagged) can be skied over especially with some care (dont turn on them or land on them) with little to no damage, Even a rock ski will cost you 200-300 so take that into consideration for a little base work and consider the value in skiing gear you enjoy and performs well vs skiing old beat skis.  

post #6 of 23

Go buy some old CMH Explosivs. 

post #7 of 23

When I replace a pair of skis I keep the old ones as my rock skis. Over the years I've realized that the new ones usually ski so much better than the old ones that I never use the old ones as rock skis. I do have a pair of Apache Recons I've been using as rock skis the last few years, mainly because they're my narrowest skis and rock ski conditions are also icy groomers and bumps conditions. Despite this abuse the Recons keep going with a few minor base repairs. And finally, as it snows more and more new terrain opens up which is just as rocky, so you never get away from the risk of rock damage. So my advice--enjoy the skis you have. When you feel like new skis, turn the old ones into your rock skis and then decide if they still ski well enough to use. I wouldn't go out and buy a pair of skis just to use as rock skis. And when a pair of skis is so old that the bindings are no longer indemnified, take them to the dump. The world doesn't need another shot ski or ski adirondack chair. Trust me on this.

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

IMHO, most rocks (unless jagged) can be skied over especially with some care (dont turn on them or land on them) with little to no damage, Even a rock ski will cost you 200-300 so take that into consideration for a little base work and consider the value in skiing gear you enjoy and performs well vs skiing old beat skis.

Typically you don't see the rock you are about to land on or turn on...

 

But all things considered, buy a pair of demo skis as your rock skis. I had my Atua demo skis from 7 years ago out at Crystal over the New Year's holiday, and managed to make it through the thin conditions up high at Xtal. It's nice not really sweating the little non-jagged rocks that were in my path. But somehow your mindset changes when you're on your brand new skis....

post #9 of 23
I just don't sweat it.
post #10 of 23
OP: You're unclear on the concept. Except for Josh, who once said "all my skis are rock skis," and those here who advocate subsidizing local shops with constant base repair, I'd guess most define rock skis like Spikedog: skis that are thrashed already. Go on fleabay and invest in a $100 pair of used good carvers. Enjoy them. Wax them yourself with an old iron. Don't repair the bases except if you can see metal peeking through the holes. And even then, you might think about trying the ptex candles yourself. Not that complicated if you don't care about perfect outcomes. 
post #11 of 23
Ski um! Could be a warm dry winter. It would be a shame if you don't get to ski them much this season. If you could predict the future and knew what was coming,get a pair of rock skis. And if you can email me, I am sure we could exploit some how and the price of skis won't matter.
post #12 of 23

Since you mentioned in your other thread that you've already hit some rocks, I would say you already have your rock skis!

 

Seriously though, I would follow Finndog's advice and just ski 'em and have fun.  They might get dinged up.  If it's bad enough, you get 'em repaired (keeping in mind that every single little mark doesn't need to be repaired, unless you're racing your bases don't have to be pristine).  Or pick up a ptex iron and some ptex and do it yourself.  Skis are meant to be skied.  Thumbs Up

post #13 of 23

Craigslist is your friend!!  Not sure where you're located, but there are a lot skis available at a dime on the dollar that will do you very well!  I see many great deals on the Denver, High Country, and Fort Collins, Colorado.  Shipping is a piece of cake with UPS, FedEX, or USPS.  Jackson, Wyoming is another good source for that type of ski.  My rule for rockers is that they "could" very well be your everyday ski, but they're not!  You don't want to sacrifice your skiing, just looing no t to sacrifice your "good boards"!!

Here's what I found in 10 seconds: http://denver.craigslist.org/spo/4825992220.html

Good luck!

Bob

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I just don't sweat it.

 

I've seen your pictures of Steamboat on Facebook and I'm calling BS.  ;)

 

You wanna ski some real rocks with crappy snow cover?  Come to Tahoe!  We're the new East Coast.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toadman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

IMHO, most rocks (unless jagged) can be skied over especially with some care (dont turn on them or land on them) with little to no damage, ...

Typically you don't see the rock you are about to land on or turn on....

 

 

True, but the trick is the train yourself out of the instinctive reaction to throw on the brakes when you hear that noise.  Just keep going.

Last weekend I found one big enough that someone skiing behind me said "I heard that!"  It left a shallow groove 18 inches long that doesn't need any repair and did not touch the edges.

post #16 of 23
I just don't sweat it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I've seen your pictures of Steamboat on Facebook and I'm calling BS.  wink.gif

You wanna ski some real rocks with crappy snow cover?  Come to Tahoe!  We're the new East Coast.

I promise that if I ever have the urge to ski more rocks, I will PM you immediately. biggrin.gif
post #17 of 23

SFB? For days when there's not enough snow to cover rocks, meaning what's there is ice? Nope. But here ya go: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fischer-RX8-All-Mountain-Skis-with-Railflex2-FX12-bindings-Length-cm-165-/281545697468?pt=Skiing&hash=item418d6e68bc

 

I owned this model, same length. Really fun and lively, super good at improving your carves, amazing grip, excellent bindings. If you're too heavy or tall for these (I'm 165, 6', used them at a smaller mountain), look for similar only longer. Lot of amazing prices on used Fischer, Elan, Dynastar carvers. 

post #18 of 23

Joking aside, I highly recommend having some rock skis.  It can make early season skiing considerably more fun.  Jumping off rocks, stumps, etc. and not giving a damn about your bases.

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal Mtn View Post

 


What would you recommend for buying rock skis?

(Not looking for particular brands, but general information, like "get the same length" or "find a cheap pair at Goodwill" or other general information. I'll be buying used so won't be able to be brand/model specific.)

 

My CL trolling got a bite on these if anyone in CO needs some rock skis (@Jason Robertson?):

http://denver.craigslist.org/spo/4833667230.html

 

I have a dozen days on my AC30 rock skis I got for a little less than that on CL.  Couldn't be happier, and here's why...

 

General advice for rock skis:

 

- Pick something you skied and loved in the past.  FInd them really cheap on CL.   It might take a while, but the deals show up eventually.  Jump on them quickly!  Look through the summer too.

 

- Go skinny:  Groomers and bumps are where the fun usually is early season when you need rock skis .  A skinny ski does better in those conditions.

 

- Go short: Likewise, a shorter ski does better on groomers and bumps too.   Big mountains are much smaller early season, and a shorter ski makes a smaller mountain more fun.

post #20 of 23

Skis are meant to be used -- they're tools, not showpieces. If you ding up your base, p-tex it up (if necessary) and get on with life. Same if you screw up your edges -- re-tune them and get back on the slopes! Nobody will ever know the difference except for yourself.

 

When I bought my own skis for the first time a few years ago, I soon thereafter picked up a second set for free, because they had some gouges in the base and the owner was moving out of town. I put some bindings on those ones with the intention of keeping them for in good shape for fresh snow days. But they skied so well that I eventually was taking them out every day, with the first skis relegated to back-up duty. And then I scratched up the first set of skis, put them away with the intention of fixing them up, and eventually ended up passing them on because I felt no need for two sets of similar skis.

 

Of course, I'll have to put this disclaimer, seeing as how I ski at Tahoe and all of my skis have a good amount of base repair at this point. Thumbs Up:dunno 

post #21 of 23

A friend in the autocross (motorsport) world once asked, "are ya gonna rub (polish) it or race it?"

post #22 of 23

Ski your current skis, one or two runs these are now your rock skis and you can now justify buying new skis that you always wanted.  ;)

post #23 of 23

Honestly, My experience with Line is that they have pretty durable bases. I have done lot of stuff on my Influence 105's that I thought were going to ding up the bases pretty good.

 

Just ski what you have, be careful. And in a couple of years. Voila, instant rock ski's.

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