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Help with ski bindings  

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
My husband bought me a pair of Élan Souls for Christmas. I'm 5'7", 165, and have previously been skiing a pair of Masterminds with Head LD12s, which I love(I have a rehabilitated knee that I've tanked back up pretty well but I'm paranoid about it, and I like the flexing heel piece on the LD12s). Level Nine Sports has the LX12 (which I'm fairly sure is the newer model of the same binding) and it'll definitely be my fallback, but I've also been looking at the following:

Marker Free Ten
Marker Squire
Look NX 10/12
Salmon STH 10
Atomic FFG 12

I don't do any park skiing. I'm comfortable on most blue runs and am working toward blacks. These are going to be my powder skis (or at least as close to powder as we get here in Pittsburgh lol). Any help in choosing would be greatly appreciated. smile.gif
post #2 of 16

If you're concerned about your knee, you might well consider the KneeBinding. Plenty of info here if you do a search, but it seems to do what it advertises: prevents ACL injuries (and looks like a standard binding).

post #3 of 16

The skeptic in me requires that I state the obvious.  There is no way to prove the Knee Binding actually prevents knee injuries. Supposedly nobody has ever suffered a blown knee using them, but who knows if that is really true, and even if it is true, the number of people using them is a very small percentage of skiers.  I suggest you stick with the Head/Tyrolia bindings.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
I looked at Knee Bindings rather extensively when I injured my knee and came to the conclusion that I don't have $350 to drop on something that hasn't been proven to work. Lol
post #5 of 16

I just put Knee bindings on my new skis. They are a bit more effort to step into. I don't think I'd put them on a powder ski. They take that much effort to step into. On firm snow they are ok, but I can't see how I'd get them on in deep snow. I have followed the directions on stepping in and do lean back a bit.

 

If there have been no reported ACL tears with people with knee bindings how can people say they don't work.

 

I believe the new STH10/12 bindings by Salomon talks about it will help release in that type backwards fall, may be check them out.

 

 

 

Update, today I had a hard time stepping into the knee bindings at 7:25AM. The spent the night in the car, after I tuned them in the basement. Tonight I'm leaving the skis in the house so maybe they don't freeze or whatever. After our 10AM break at the summit lodge I was able to step right into them.


Edited by Max Capacity - 12/30/14 at 3:29pm
post #6 of 16


I agree the KB takes a little more effort to step into than other bindings. However, a couple weeks ago in Steamboat I had no trouble stepping into them in a foot or so of powder. They are a very solid binding and I like them!  I look at the extra cost as insurance. I haven't fallen since I put them on the skis, but if I do I believe I will have more protection against an injury than if I didn't.

post #7 of 16

Good to hear about getting into them in a foot of snow. Yes, I feel safer having them.

post #8 of 16

This is my seventh (7th) season on KneeBindings, and I'm up to 383 ski days on them so far. I've had NO pre-releases and many proper releases with my KneeBindings during many falls over these seven (7) seasons. I cannot say the same thing about any traditional binding that I've been on, since I've pre-released out of them all and also been injured on some due to non-release.

 

WRT injuries, I've had no injuries that could be attributed to KneeBindings and certainly no knee injuries since I began using them after my ACL Reconstruction Surgery resulting from a fall while on traditional bindings. However, I have incurred several injuries such as a concussion and dislocated shoulder during falls/collisions but again these were not the fault of the KneeBindings. These injuries were attributed to the actual falling/colliding that can happen when skiing. There is no such thing as a guarantee against injury, just some statistics, and I would like to think I stacked that deck a little in my favor by being on KneeBindings.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 

This is my seventh (7th) season on KneeBindings, and I'm up to 383 ski days on them so far. I've had NO pre-releases and many proper releases with my KneeBindings during many falls over these seven (7) seasons. I cannot say the same thing about any traditional binding that I've been on, since I've pre-released out of them all and also been injured on some due to non-release.

 

WRT injuries, I've had no injuries that could be attributed to KneeBindings and certainly no knee injuries since I began using them after my ACL Reconstruction Surgery resulting from a fall while on traditional bindings. However, I have incurred several injuries such as a concussion and dislocated shoulder during falls/collisions but again these were not the fault of the KneeBindings. These injuries were attributed to the actual falling/colliding that can happen when skiing. There is no such thing as a guarantee against injury, just some statistics, and I would like to think I stacked that deck a little in my favor by being on KneeBindings.

 

Not getting into the knee binding thing here. However, do you really experience that many falls and collisions in the last 7 years?

I'm not trying to be obnoxious or anything. If it was me, I would be a total wreck. I generally experience a couple of minor tripping type falls per season.

I generally think of skiing more as dancing with gravity rather than a MMA cage match with multiple opponents on the other side.

Maybe it's time for a rethink.   

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akaleikeike View Post

My husband bought me a pair of Élan Souls for Christmas. I'm 5'7", 165, and have previously been skiing a pair of Masterminds with Head LD12s, which I love(I have a rehabilitated knee that I've tanked back up pretty well but I'm paranoid about it, and I like the flexing heel piece on the LD12s). Level Nine Sports has the LX12 (which I'm fairly sure is the newer model of the same binding) and it'll definitely be my fallback, but I've also been looking at the following:

Marker Free Ten
Marker Squire
Look NX 10/12
Salmon STH 10
Atomic FFG 12

I don't do any park skiing. I'm comfortable on most blue runs and am working toward blacks. These are going to be my powder skis (or at least as close to powder as we get here in Pittsburgh lol). Any help in choosing would be greatly appreciated. smile.gif

Welcome to EpicSki!  Here are a couple of relevant threads about the STH.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/128270/another-binding-thread-marker-squire-solomon-sth-12-solomon-sth2-13

http://www.epicski.com/t/119404/preview-review-2014-salomon-sth2-binding-series

 

For what it's worth, I have the Look on my Black Pearls.  Did not like the Marker Squire that were on some Utah rentals a few years ago.  Hard to get in.  I needed knee rehab a few years ago, but  now that I keep in better shape, I'm skiing better than ever.

 

Off topic: have you ever skied at Blue Knob?  The Mid-Atlantic Gathering will be there Feb. 6-8.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

Not getting into the knee binding thing here. However, do you really experience that many falls and collisions in the last 7 years?

I'm not trying to be obnoxious or anything. If it was me, I would be a total wreck. I generally experience a couple of minor tripping type falls per season.

I generally think of skiing more as dancing with gravity rather than a MMA cage match with multiple opponents on the other side.

Maybe it's time for a rethink.   

 

Maybe you just don't ski very much, or you don't like to challenge yourself on steep terrain, bumps, and rutted race courses. That's fine too, as skiing provides a different fulfillment for everyone.

 

I don't actually fall very often, but 383 ski days is a good number of ski days - actually 384 if you count today. It's a pretty large statistical sample, while smaller sample sizes can sometimes be misleading. For example, over the 22 days I've skied so far this season I haven't yet fallen - but I can pretty much guarantee that I will fall a number of times over the course of this whole season. I do typically ski 60 to 70 days per season, and they add up over the years. Falls do happen, and sometimes you do get injured. As far as collisions go, I've only had the one over these past seven years when another skier hit me from behind and gave me a concussion (I was wearing a helmet). My blown ACL was 8 years ago, before I began using KneeBindings, and was only 1 of around 70,000 such blown ACLs that occur each year due to skiing. The KneeBinding technology became available when I was recovering from this injury which I incurred on traditional bindings, which led to me becoming an early KneeBinding adopter.

 

The reason I care about bindings is to try and manage my exposure to potential injuries while still enjoying the thrill and challenge of skiing. Again, there are no guarantees!

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice, all! I had almost decided to go with the Looks, but my local ski shop managed to rustle up another set of LD12s and make me a happy person. smile.gif
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

Not getting into the knee binding thing here. However, do you really experience that many falls and collisions in the last 7 years?

I'm not trying to be obnoxious or anything. If it was me, I would be a total wreck. I generally experience a couple of minor tripping type falls per season.

I generally think of skiing more as dancing with gravity rather than a MMA cage match with multiple opponents on the other side.

Maybe it's time for a rethink.   

 

Maybe you just don't ski very much, or you don't like to challenge yourself on steep terrain, bumps, and rutted race courses. 

 

 

:rolleyes

 

Chris, you need to come out and join one of the gatherings and ground yourself in some EpicSki reality. Think of it as extremely enjoyable humbition. (Humiliation sounds bad, but being humble is good, and shouldn't hold you back. So I made up a word to try to express this.) Grump can ski rings around most people on the hill, quite likely including you. He also gets in a boatload of ski days skiing all terrain at some of the toughest mountains on the continent, notably including Taos and Snowbird. Plenty of others on this board fall into the same bucket as he does.

 

One of the things about big-mountain skiing that I have learned (? intellectually, at least, if not in practice) from this crew is that if you're going to ski all day long on huge steep mountains for days in a row without total rebellion from your body - especially if you are a flatlander like you and I - you absolutely have to pay some attention to efficiency, to conservation of effort, and to balancing short term thrills with week- or season-long enjoyment. KG is a master of these things. In fact his non-response here is probably a great example of exactly that skill. Don't let that fool you into thinking that he does not have technical chops, courage to tackle steeps, a strong fitness level, or anything else that might be required in a given moment on a given piece of terrain.

post #14 of 16

Tony I think it is, it's not about who's the best skier, or who can out ski whom. Save your pedantic speech for your buddy who criticized me for getting injured several times over many years when challenging myself with difficult conditions, and his reference to MMA fighting a mob - and then more insultingly his suggestion of rethinking skiing altogether. You're approach merely reveals that you're yet another Joshey, and his restraint reveals that maybe he's not.

post #15 of 16

^^^^ FWIW, first I didn't read Grump's comment on MMA as being directed especially at you. He was simply setting up an analogy about different ways of approaching skiing. Second, I din't read q's comment as pedantic (go look up the term). Third, I did read Grump's comment about rethinking things as being self-referent; he was wryly making a comment about his own way of doing things. Fourth, it's not clear to me - as someone who does gates every damn weekend - that there's any evidence that challenging ourselves is more dangerous than not, unless we're in Lindsey Vonn territory. I just got a decent injury not by challenging myself on a course or the steeps, but getting careless at speed in bad snow on a stupid runout. A patroller buddy says she sees more injuries in good skiers from that than from attacking difficult stretches, where all systems are on high alert.

 

Fifth, real athletics are always a cost benefit analysis. As q says, if a member here is hitting big terrain, day after day - and factor in age here - the benefits of constantly pushing our bodies to 9/10 may not be worth the costs. Especially if that member already is an accomplished skier. I watch videos of guys like Sierra Jim, who's forgotten more about mechanics than you or I will ever know, and I see a guy who's fluid, under complete control, and enjoying himself at a point when we don't heal as fast as we did at 20. He could still smoke you or I without breaking a sweat, BTW. I see the same thing when I watch 40-something instructors who depend on teaching for a chunk of their income. Comprende? "Challenging" ourselves constantly is neither a necessary or sufficient condition for being a good skier. It does, however, tend to characterize a lot of so-so skiers I see who think energy will emerge victorious over skill. 

 

So chill, stop assuming everything's about you, and go, ah, hit those challenges. Your bindings will save you. ;)

post #16 of 16

mod note - locking the thread. The OP has received the help requested and beyond has done a great job ending the side argument.

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