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Please recommend a firm snow short turn carver for a strong female in the Alps.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I'm going to source a new ski for my 25 year old daughter who lives in Milan, Italy. She currently has a 169cm Atomic Crimson and a 165cm Fisher RX9. She wants to keep the Atomic for all mountain skiing. However, the the RX9 is not ideal as a short turn carver on ice, and I'm seeking recommendations for a short radius ski for icy conditions on steeper big mountain slopes. The ski needs to be versatile enough for some mogals and some softer snow, but the ski will see carved turns on firm snow 80% of the time. She is skiing every month and travels to Courchevel, Monte Rosa, and Saalbach.

What ski and ski length we you recommend? She is 135 lbs, 5' 5", and an very athletic with consistent linked carved turns at moderate to faster speeds on steeper slopes. Her technique is solid 95% time, but the ski needs to forgive the occasional off-balance error. I'm considering skis like the Head Supershape or the Blizzard Power 800s, but would like broaden my search and benefit from the opinions here.
Edited by WILDCAT - 12/28/14 at 7:52am
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post

I'm going to source a new ski for my 25 year old daughter who lives in Milan, Italy. She currently has a 169cm Atomic Crimson and a slightly shorter Fisher RX9. She wants to keep the Atomic for all mountain skiing. However, the the RX9 is not ideal as a short turn carver on ice, and I'm seeking recommendations for a short radius ski for icy conditions on steeper big mountain slopes. The ski needs to be versatile enough for some mogals and some softer snow, but the ski will see carved turns on firm snow 80% of the time. She is skiing every month and travels to Courchevel, Monte Rosa, and Saalbach.

What ski and ski length we you recommend? She is 135 lbs, 5' 5", and an very athletic with consistent linked carved turns at moderate to faster speeds on steeper slopes. Her technique is solid 95% time, but the ski needs to forgive the occasional off-balance error. I'm considering skis like the Head Supershape or the Blizzard Power 800s, but would like broaden my search and benefit from the opinions here.

 

I am a couple inches taller, same weight. The skis you mention in your last sentence are good ideas. I have been on the RX9 and can understand where she is coming from on that. (More of a GS-style ski for smaller folks like us.)

 

If she has the opportunity to get on a 155cm slalom ski, she should try that to see what she thinks. I think I am moving to that as my hard-snow groomer ski (from an ancestor of the Power 800s, which I liked very much) just because it is so, so fun, does not require quite as much speed to bend, and actually is easier in bumps, perhaps because of the short length. I happen to be on a Volkl model circa 2011, with the red Marker piston plate on it. I think it is the civilian model. Cannot speak to where this fits among other brands in terms of stiffness, etc., but this one, at least, is very easy to ski - like spicy butter.

post #3 of 7

I think there are a few here that would recommend some relatively soft slalom skis.

These are the ones I use.

http://www.fischersports.com/en/Alpine/Products/Skis/Race/7015-RC4-Worldcup-SC

She would probably want the 155 length at her weight.

You can find great used SC4's for very little money.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

I am a couple inches taller, same weight. The skis you mention in your last sentence are good ideas. I have been on the RX9 and can understand where she is coming from on that. (More of a GS-style ski for smaller folks like us.)

If she has the opportunity to get on a 155cm slalom ski, she should try that to see what she thinks. I think I am moving to that as my hard-snow groomer ski (from an ancestor of the Power 800s, which I liked very much) just because it is so, so fun, does not require quite as much speed to bend, and actually is easier in bumps, perhaps because of the short length. I happen to be on a Volkl model circa 2011, with the red Marker piston plate on it. I think it is the civilian model. Cannot speak to where this fits among other brands in terms of stiffness, etc., but this one, at least, is very easy to ski - like spicy butter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

I think there are a few here that would recommend some relatively soft slalom skis.
These are the ones I use.
http://www.fischersports.com/en/Alpine/Products/Skis/Race/7015-RC4-Worldcup-SC
She would probably want the 155 length at her weight.
You can find great used SC4's for very little money.

Yes, I'm starting to think in terms of the recreational slalom ski in the 155 to 160 length. Something more forgiving and versatile than any race ski, but with a <15 meter turn radius and a waist <74mm. The Fischer RC4 is as race oriented as I would consider. The Atomic Redster Edge SH fits the criteria well.

How well would a ski like the Blizzard G Force Supersonic in a 160cm perform? The 121-72-103mm sidecut looks ideal. Blizzard also makes a nearly identical "Viva 600" version of the Supersonic that looks interesting. I'm also looking at the Dynastar Exclusive Elite, which looks like the ladies version of the Contact 4x4.

Any opinions on these skies would be welcome.
Edited by WILDCAT - 12/28/14 at 9:38am
post #5 of 7

Let me suggest something different than the usual suspects.

Because your daughter is in Italy, she would have access to skis made at the Blossom plant which is located there. Not only does Blossom sell its own branded skis, it makes boards for VIST, Hart and other high end labels.

As the owner of a pair of VIST carvers and their fraternal twin, the Hart Phoenix, I can attest to their pedigree and quality. With dimensions of 116-66-101, the math tells half the story. The other is the wonderful quality and feel of these very well-crafted skis.

As a Mainer, I am no stranger to hardpacked and icy conditions. That is when I reach for the VIST's or Hart's. With a 1/3 bevel and sharp edges, they are a scalpel. I do find the VIST's less forgiving than the Hart sibling, but that is likely due to the VIST comp plates on them. VIST has a brilliant modular system that allows you to mount a plate and then move the toe and heel up and down the length of the plate, fine tuning the ride to taste. The plate on my VIST's definitely adds stiffness. But the recreational plate (TT plate shown) on my Phoenix's does not. 

Kastle3.jpg

 

My wife skis on a pair of the VIST carvers and loves them. She is a solid intermediate and has no difficulty with them - even with the stiff plate. But they are, for her, like a driving a Porsche around town.

The VIST's, so far as I know, are not available in the US, except, perhaps, at the Nordic House in Stratton, Vt. They certainly are available in Italy. But they are costly skis - probably in the $1000 range.

In the alternative, I would absolutely jump on this deal:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hart-Phoenix-BRAND-NEW-/181092094983?pt=Skiing&var=&hash=item2a29ee1407

Get them in the 158cm length. This is an extraordinary ski at a stupid good price. On them, she could leave all those heartbroken young Italian men in the dust. 
I wish your daughter happy trails. 
D1
 
PS: I owned and skied the Supersonic for a few years. It is a vary capable ski. But the VIST/Phoenix are in another league.

Edited by deliberate1 - 12/28/14 at 9:36am
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post

Let me suggest something different than the usual suspects.
Because your daughter is in Italy, she would have access to skis made at the Blossom plant which is located there. Not only does Blossom sell its own branded skis, it makes boards for VIST, Hart and other high end labels.
As the owner of a pair of VIST carvers and their fraternal twin, the Hart Phoenix, I can attest to their pedigree and quality. With dimensions of 116-66-101, the math tells half the story. The other is the wonderful quality and feel of these very well-crafted skis.
As a Mainer, I am no stranger to hardpacked and icy conditions. That is when I reach for the VIST's or Hart's. With a 1/3 bevel and sharp edges, they are a scalpel. I do find the VIST's less forgiving than the Hart sibling, but that is likely due to the VIST comp plates on them. VIST has a brilliant modular system that allows you to mount a plate and then move the toe and heel up and down the length of the plate, fine tuning the ride to taste. The plate on my VIST's definitely adds stiffness. But the recreational plate (TT plate shown) on my Phoenix's does not. 
Kastle3.jpg


My wife skis on a pair of the VIST carvers and loves them. She is a solid intermediate and has no difficulty with them - even with the stiff plate. But they are, for her, like a driving a Porsche around town.
The VIST's, so far as I know, are not available in the US, except, perhaps, at the Nordic House in Stratton, Vt. They certainly are available in Italy. But they are costly skis - probably in the $1000 range.
In the alternative, I would absolutely jump on this deal:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hart-Phoenix-BRAND-NEW-/181092094983?pt=Skiing&var=&hash=item2a29ee1407
Get them in the 158cm length. This is an extraordinary ski at a stupid good price. On them, she could leave all those heartbroken young Italian men in the dust. 
I wish your daughter happy trails. 
D1
 
PS: I owned and skied the Supersonic for a few years. It is a vary capable ski. But the VIST/Phoenix are in another league.

Hi deliberate1,

Yes, she is skiing with the boys and no one has to slow down. She also played on the University of Milans Ladies soccer team and enjoys cycling the mountains near Lake Como.

That's an interesting suggestion. I'm familiar with the Vist name and the Hart Phoenix is intriguing. Could a binding like a Fisher/Tyrolia Railflex be installed, or does anything less than a racers system ruin the ski?
Edited by WILDCAT - 12/28/14 at 10:00am
post #7 of 7


That's an interesting suggestion. I'm familiar with the Vist name and the Hart Phoenix is intriguing. Could a binding like a Fisher/Tyrolia Railflex be installed, or does anything less than a racers system ruin the ski?

The TT plate shown above is what I have on my Phoenix, Hart Pulse, Kastle MX 98's and FX84's. It is not a competition plate because it articulates and adds not stiffness to the ski. The one piece plates, like the Speedplate on my VIST carvers does stiffen the ski.

The system is quite convenient since all you need is one set of bindings for innumerable skis. Great for traveling. The ability to adjust forward and aft allows me to adjust to the conditions (forward on hard and a bit back in soft). And easy to have others use your skis - if you are so inclined. With the TT plate, there is an integrated 4mm plastic shim (shown above) that can go under the toe to change the ramp (?) angle.

I can not speak to the suitability of the Fisher/Tyrolia railflex system as I am not familiar with it. But I see no necessity of a "race" binding system on the Phoenix. It is a beautifully balanced ski that need no assistance from a stiff binding to shine. Indeed, while the VIST carvers and Phoenix I have are identical save for the top skins, I tend to reach for the Phoenix because the VIST with the Speedlock race-ish plates make for a more demanding, if not more exhilarating ride.

This set up would be a good complement to the Phoenix.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vist-Speedlock-V412-DIN-4-12-Blk-Red-78mm-Bindings-w-SL-TT-Plates-NEW-/301431467392?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item462eb72d80

 

If your daughter needs a more robust DIN range, she could go with the 614 binding, which is what I have. What I can not tell you is whether the 78mm brake would be too wide for this 66mm waisted ski

Hope this helps.

D1

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