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Help Instructing Wife - Page 2

post #31 of 44
I'm looking forward to meeting your wife..
post #32 of 44

That's interesting, my wife and I have skied together exclusively my entire skiing "career".   We have a good time and are pretty much on the same level but with different strengths and weaknesses. She would benefit a lot just from skiing with somebody other than me and I'm sure you two will get along.

post #33 of 44

They have a sign at Lake Louise (I'm paraphrasing here) that points out that buying your significant other professional ski lesson is less costly than teaching him/her yourself AND paying for a divorce lawyer.

post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

That's interesting, my wife and I have skied together exclusively my entire skiing "career".   We have a good time and are pretty much on the same level but with different strengths and weaknesses. She would benefit a lot just from skiing with somebody other than me and I'm sure you two will get along.


@Philpug  and I enjoy a ton of time on the hill but (in general) we don't instruct each other. 

Funny thing tho, I learn a lot from him when he gives someone else a tip and I pay attention. ;)

post #35 of 44

Questions for the OP - why is your wife embarrassed to take lessons? And does she ever ski with anyone other than you? Also, are you by any chance still in a honeymoon phase of marriage?

 

If she skis with others, maybe a girls weekend/ski clinic is in order.

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pequenita View Post
 

Questions for the OP - why is your wife embarrassed to take lessons? And does she ever ski with anyone other than you? Also, are you by any chance still in a honeymoon phase of marriage?

 

If she skis with others, maybe a girls weekend/ski clinic is in order.


I think this is one of the best suggestions.  

Treating her to a women's clinic weekend is a true gift. 

post #37 of 44

Maybe Yogaman is that rare bird...but I'll chime in, as an instructor, as a woman, and as someone whose SO attempted to teach me to snowboard....DON'T GO THERE!

 

It might be an interesting thread to expand upon the "adventures" caused by teaching or being taught by one's spouse.

 

I'll start.  Mr. Snowboard started yelling when Mrs. Snowboard (I) told him he was telling her too many things at once.  Mrs. Snowboard then started to panic, fell, and told him she no longer wanted the lesson.  She stomped off and had her next lesson with someone neutral from the snowsports school.  That's a brief synopsis of what actually took about an hour but is too boring as well as painful to recall.

 

 

To this day Mr. Snowboard refuses any helpful "tips" from Mrs. Snowboard, and Mrs. Snowboard certainly tunes out Mr. Snowboard.  That's about skiing, snowboarding, and many other things.

:duel:

Jane

post #38 of 44

It's great to have a wife that likes to ski. It's a rare commodity.  But don't try to teach her.  It took me 10 years of professional instructor training to become merely competent and another 10 to really figure things out. Too often  I see "professional" instructors providing poor advice, so I have even less faith in someone untrained to teach skiing. 

 

There is ONE area that you can help her out without a lot of training: Turn Shape. IMO turn shape is the most important thing in skiing whether your a beginner or an expert slamming gates  Make sure her turns are round, regardless of the radius and that she doesn't rush the tops (or bottoms) of the turns, trying to shape the tops as well as possible.  I've found that focusing on turn shape often corrects many mechanical issues without further mention of them. 

 

Good luck. 


Edited by vindibona1 - 1/7/15 at 12:06pm
post #39 of 44

The correct stance over the skis is more important than turn shape.  Turn shape can be correct only if the skier is correctly riding their skis.  Well, maybe correct turn shape can be forced by someone with an incorrect stance, but turn shape isn't the first thing to work on.

 

Is a wedge christie/stem christie a skill to be taught or a bad habit to break? I think the latter and never the former, especially with modern skis.  I oppose teaching anyone anything that must be un-learned.  It takes about ten times the number of repetitions to replace a movement than to originally learn a movement.  On modern skis many first day skiers can be making simple parallel turns on easy slopes their first afternoon.

 

123, a woman's clinic is a great idea, but there are some things you can do in advance so she gets the maximum benefit.  On an easy slope, get her standing tall on the balls of her feet all the time.  It is very important that her center of mass is about over her toe bindings.  Shin pressure against the boot tongues is an indicator but not a goal.  If anyone tells her to squat down to pressure her shins against the tongues, nod yes and ignore them.  It's too tiring.  Standing tall on the balls of the feet with a bit of flexibility in the knees & waist works great.  Do not tell her to get her weight forward...how is one to do that???  Tell her to get her feet back, so far back that they feel like they're behind her.  On a steep pitch get her to go head first down the hill.  Start on small rollers or very small drop offs where there is no chance of her skis running away.  The movement while moving is to strongly pull both feet back almost behind the body as the feet go over the lip of the drop off.  It takes practice.

 

Have her narrow her stance to walking-width.  That's where our bodies have learned to balance.  Give her something to substitute for the wedge turn.  The four points down in this posting are excellent.

http://www.epicski.com/t/109454/still-having-major-leg-burning-when-i-ski#post_1421309

post #40 of 44

My husband and I are now at equal levels of skiing.  Sometimes we get the chance to ski together, there are times when we want to work on drills and ask how we look or if we are doing something correct.  However when he was first learning to ski I made him take lessons.  I told him I loved him and wanted to be with him forever but if I taught him to ski it would end it.  He 100% agreed and learned to ski without my instruction.  

 

I see too many times on the slopes the boyfriend or girlfriend want to teach their SO skiing.  Usually the non skier is in tears or has a look of frustration.  Other times I see the SO teaching the nonskier on slopes Waaaayyyy beyond their ability. 

 

To 123, let her have fun skiing with you and have an instructor give her tips to improve.  You can later do drills if she is willing, and you might learn something from her

post #41 of 44
I taught my wife to ski in one day. That said, the road to teach was very pain as I first had to crack a couple vertebrae skiing the week earlier. This slowed me down enough that I wasn't stupid enough to get her into any difficult beyond any hard green runs as they hurt to ski.

My advice let someone else do it, it's less hard on your body wink.gif .
post #42 of 44

Youtube videos and MA on this forum. That's how I learnt.

post #43 of 44

Run...don't walk to the nearest ski school and then wish her the best of luck

post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by 123ski View Post
 

She is very willing to listen to me

 

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