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Broken Ski - Are these fixable

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
My three day old Kendos just fell apart. Hit what I thought was a smallish rock, not something i'd expect a ski to fall apart over.

Fortunately I didn't realize it until later in the run when I hit around 50mph and couldn't hold an edge to save my life.

One ski shop is sending me to another place but said it doesn't look good.

Writing this from the gondola. Here's a pic

https://www.dropbox.com/s/w1ah0liytokkwil/volkl.jpg?dl=0
post #2 of 22

Fixable ? Doubtful.

post #3 of 22

Looks fixable but costly and they will never run quite the same again.

 

That is too bad.  A slightly less merry xmas.

 

But that edge should be able to be epoxied back in and then the coreshot can be basepatched.  At my shop that repair would cost something in the range of $100-$150.  Can't see the sidewall so that may complicate/make more expensive.

 

I would not ski anymore today on those.

post #4 of 22

It will never be the same.   Sometimes the ski shop or vendor will cut you a break if you just bought the ski and replace it for you even though it is obvious damage and not typical warranty coverage scenario.

 

You may be able to glue and clamp it back in to place and fill the p-tex in but don't ski that ski on your left foot anymore.  Keep the good, undamaged edge in your inside (right boot) from now on if you do try to fix it and keep using it.

 

Good luck with the shop and Kastle.  I'd at least bring it in and ask them to replace it since the ski is only 3 days old as you say... assuming you have a receipt that shows that..

post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

It will never be the same.   Sometimes the ski shop or vendor will cut you a break if you just bought the ski and replace it for you even though it is obvious damage and not typical warranty coverage scenario.

 

You may be able to glue and clamp it back in to place and fill the p-tex in but don't ski that ski on your left foot anymore.  Keep the good, undamaged edge in your inside (right boot) from now on if you do try to fix it and keep using it.

 

Good luck with the shop and Kastle.  I'd at least bring it in and ask them to replace it since the ski is only 3 days old as you say... assuming you have a receipt that shows that..

 

Just to make a quick correction here, this is a Volkl Kendo not a Kastle.  I doubt you will get too much of a deal for an obvious rock damage. I also doubt the shop will offer you much aside from a discount on an attempt at repair.  Sadly skiing fast in hit or miss coverage opens one up to these sorts of things. 

post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiessentials View Post
 

 

Just to make a quick correction here, this is a Volkl Kendo not a Kastle.  I doubt you will get too much of a deal for an obvious rock damage. I also doubt the shop will offer you much aside from a discount on an attempt at repair.  Sadly skiing fast in hit or miss coverage opens one up to these sorts of things. 


 I realize that.  This is why I said "though it is obvious damage and not typical warranty coverage scenario.".  That said, I have worked in retail management for over ten years.  I've occasionally been able to lobby corporate (retail chain corporate) to work directly with the vendor and replace pretty expensive merchandise even though the cause of the problem was nothing that the warranty was supposed to cover.  It does happen.  it is just a HUGE exception when it does.  OP is probably out of luck but there may be no harm in asking.  The fact that the ski is three days old does help some.  Many times our repair shop would repair stuff if it was repairable in similar situations.  Replacement was rare though.

 

If the ski was purchased at REI or some place other place with their own crazy stupid additional guarantee that could also happen..  Not sure if the carry Volkl though LOL

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone. I went from one shop to another and finally got a referral to the best repair guy in Breck (Pup's Glide Shop). It's a small shop where all they do is tuning and repair. The owner said it is repairable and that it will be almost as good as new, but that I would be relegated to using the repaired ski as my outside ski. He showed me a couple other skis with similar damage and pictures of before and after repairs.

 

It's $140 to repair it and they'll do a full tune on both skis as well. It'll take two days due to the epoxy work, etc. I was talking to the manager at my hotel as we rode the elevator today. I explained what happened and told him Pup's said they could fix it, and he said, they're definitely the best in town and they can do amazing things. Here's their URL: http://www.pupsglideshop.co/

 

That said, it won't be 100%, but hopefully as the outside edge it'll be good enough, the repair shop was confident it'd be a non-issue. I've only had them for three days, and they were bought online so I don't really have a sympathy story to pull with anyone. It does seem like I'm in good hands in terms of the repair, and hopefully there won't be negative skiing characteristics. I won't get to test them until my next ski trip which is in 2015.

 

Thanks again, wish me luck.

post #8 of 22

Ya, anytime major damage along the edge under the boot happens that ski gets assigned as whatever side puts the damage on the outside edge..

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Ya, anytime major damage along the edge under the boot happens that ski gets assigned as whatever side puts the damage on the outside edge..

Yeah that seems to be the case. I was using this as my left ski, but now it'll be the right ski which would put that damage on the outermost right side of the right ski.

 

Why is this the case? Is there just less pressure and energy on the outside edges? It seems that no matter what there would be situations where max force would be on any given edge.

 

Thanks

post #10 of 22

Yes.  I once  had similar damage to a ski.  The shop cut out the damaged edge and replaced it and patched the ski's base.  My skis were brand new at the time and I used them for a good 3 seasons after that, just keeping the repaired edge as my outside edge.  

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

Yes.  I once  had similar damage to a ski.  The shop cut out the damaged edge and replaced it and patched the ski's base.  My skis were brand new at the time and I used them for a good 3 seasons after that, just keeping the repaired edge as my outside edge.  


Thanks that inspires some confidence.

post #12 of 22

I had a very similar repair done, but it didn't last. Probably didn't help that the  bases were almost gone from grinding. The reason you want that edge on the outside is that on hard snow--the kind most likely to rip out an edge--most of your weight should be on the outside ski inside edge, and of course if you hit a rock sideways, which is how your ripped the edge out in the first place, it's the inside edge that will hit the rock. Generally speaking if you have a choice it's better to go straight over a rock than hit it sideways. Good place for a little jump. If the repair holds I wouldn't expect it to make much difference in the feel or performance of the ski.

post #13 of 22

I would have complete confidence in their assessment that you will never notice this again.

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianV View Post
 

Thanks everyone. I went from one shop to another and finally got a referral to the best repair guy in Breck (Pup's Glide Shop). It's a small shop where all they do is tuning and repair. The owner said it is repairable and that it will be almost as good as new, but that I would be relegated to using the repaired ski as my outside ski. He showed me a couple other skis with similar damage and pictures of before and after repairs.

 

It's $140 to repair it and they'll do a full tune on both skis as well. It'll take two days due to the epoxy work, etc. I was talking to the manager at my hotel as we rode the elevator today. I explained what happened and told him Pup's said they could fix it, and he said, they're definitely the best in town and they can do amazing things. Here's their URL: http://www.pupsglideshop.co/

 

That said, it won't be 100%, but hopefully as the outside edge it'll be good enough, the repair shop was confident it'd be a non-issue. I've only had them for three days, and they were bought online so I don't really have a sympathy story to pull with anyone. It does seem like I'm in good hands in terms of the repair, and hopefully there won't be negative skiing characteristics. I won't get to test them until my next ski trip which is in 2015.

 

Thanks again, wish me luck.

FYI,

Next time if truly you broke something that was just bought, like within 90 days; you usually have damage protection from your credit card, along with theft and warranty extension as well.

Check with your credit cards to see which have it, not every card qualifies, but many do. 

There used to be a commercial where the guy runs over his own golf clubs, so it covers things due to your own fault too.

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone, Merry Xmas!!!

 

In regards to the warranty and replacement via CC, etc, there really aren't any options. I did buy them with my VISA, but they were purchased from eBay, and when I said 3-days old, that meant my third day with them. I didn't realize this thread would get into this detail about warranty, etc. These were purchased as year old demo skis with a full tune/repair. Upon receipt, top sheets and bases were in near-perfect condition. I bought them in late Summer as 2013/2014 demo skis that were fully tuned with perfect bases and near-perfect top-sheets.

 

That said, I was talking to my friend today, and it does beg the question whether I should just pay full pop for skis at REI going forward. Normally I try to buy brand new skis that are one season old, but I really wanted Kendos after demo'ing 15 different skis over the past two seasons, and I found these. These are the first used skis I've bought, but buying them used had nothing to do with the unfortunate incident with the rock : /

 

For what it's worth, the only other ski I had particular interest in was the Kastle MX88, but I hadn't been able to find them for demo, and there weren't any examples to buy at reasonable price. Having tested the Kendos twice and really liked them, I struck on this deal as it was a ski I really knew I wanted to replace my aging Nordica Hotrod Jet Fuels. All that said, buying these, there is no recourse via credit card, return, sympathy, etc. I can live with that considering the reasonable deal I got and the condition they were in upon receipt

 

I've hit many rocks and had to have base repairs done, but I caught this rock on a hard turn on a very steep run right under the boot. Initially when I heard the rock hit I didn't think any different of it except maybe I'd have some minimal base damage, but later on that run when I couldn't hold a fast long-arc right-hand carve at high speed (~50mph), I knew something wasn't right. The damaged left ski was wobbling and unstable, it was all over the place; I had to rely on the inner right ski to get me through the turn, after which I noticed the inside of the ski was coming apart. I'm actually fortunate, I really could've wiped out hard as that left ski was all over the place. The repair guy said, all it takes is getting the rock to hit underfoot at the right angle and it's all she wrote...

 

Live and learn, I'll consider full price REI next time though as I've had good experiences replacing things for random things (broken expedition tent due to high winds, etc.).

 

Cheers,

Brian

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I had a very similar repair done, but it didn't last. Probably didn't help that the  bases were almost gone from grinding. The reason you want that edge on the outside is that on hard snow--the kind most likely to rip out an edge--most of your weight should be on the outside ski inside edge, and of course if you hit a rock sideways, which is how your ripped the edge out in the first place, it's the inside edge that will hit the rock. Generally speaking if you have a choice it's better to go straight over a rock than hit it sideways. Good place for a little jump. If the repair holds I wouldn't expect it to make much difference in the feel or performance of the ski.

Thanks, your explanation made perfect sense. I hit the right making a right turn under hard power. The rock was not visible at speed and it wasn't a large rock but a 1-2" round ball sticking out of the snow on an otherwise well covered bowl. It was above treeline on Peak 6 with high wind making the cover thin in areas but I had run it twice before without issues. Breck had just received 40" in 48 hours. It was purely bad luck, but as you said, I hit it with the outside ski's inner edge. That was also the edge that almost wiped me out later in the run so you're explanation makes perfect sense.

Thanks.
post #17 of 22

I'm glad you are able to and decided to repair your skis!  In my 30+ years as a ski tech, my shop and those I worked for repaired those kind of edge pull outs on a regular basis; college town, great skiers on a tight budget!  This repair has some very good things going for it:  the edge is intact to it will lay nicely, the rock didn't go too deep at initial impact, the base is black, and it is uner your foot where the ski doesn't flex much if at all.  Ski supply companies have really shrunk over the years, but my go to epoxy for this damage was made by a Swiss company called Montana.  The epoxy was Coltana 2000.  amazing stuff, of which I'm sure your repair shop has the latest and greatest update on materials!

 

My conjecture on the pull out is the lateness of when you hit the rock.  90% of the time, you'll get the digger from about the middle of the base, then un-weight for the next turn, or hear it and physically lift the ski.  The net result is the core shot.  With your Kendo's the evidence shows that this was a very late hit, and put the rock into a perfect line to lever the edge out.  Early season and some terrain usually add up to this!

 

It is great advice to use this as your outside edge, but like the shop said, and I'm betting they show you with a true bar, that the ski is as good as new.  The reason I'd still swap them it to put less turn forces on the repair if it were the inside edge.

Have Fun and make some turns!

Bob

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawk56 View Post
 

I'm glad you are able to and decided to repair your skis!  In my 30+ years as a ski tech, my shop and those I worked for repaired those kind of edge pull outs on a regular basis; college town, great skiers on a tight budget!  This repair has some very good things going for it:  the edge is intact to it will lay nicely, the rock didn't go too deep at initial impact, the base is black, and it is uner your foot where the ski doesn't flex much if at all.  Ski supply companies have really shrunk over the years, but my go to epoxy for this damage was made by a Swiss company called Montana.  The epoxy was Coltana 2000.  amazing stuff, of which I'm sure your repair shop has the latest and greatest update on materials!

 

My conjecture on the pull out is the lateness of when you hit the rock.  90% of the time, you'll get the digger from about the middle of the base, then un-weight for the next turn, or hear it and physically lift the ski.  The net result is the core shot.  With your Kendo's the evidence shows that this was a very late hit, and put the rock into a perfect line to lever the edge out.  Early season and some terrain usually add up to this!

 

It is great advice to use this as your outside edge, but like the shop said, and I'm betting they show you with a true bar, that the ski is as good as new.  The reason I'd still swap them it to put less turn forces on the repair if it were the inside edge.

Have Fun and make some turns!

Bob


Thanks, I got them back and they look great. You can only tell under close examination and with the total fresh coat of wax, they'll run better than ever I'm sure. The owner of the shop was really happy with how they turned out. I can't wait to give them a go again!

post #19 of 22

Great news!  You know, with the tune the shop gave them post repair, they may just ski better than they ever have!  Enjoy every turn like it's your last!

Hawk

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawk56 View Post
 

Great news!  You know, with the tune the shop gave them post repair, they may just ski better than they ever have!  Enjoy every turn like it's your last!

Hawk


Yeah, this is probably the best tune I've ever had. Most of the time I just get some machine tune, there is definitely some TLC in this outfit's tunes.

 

Cheers,
Brian

post #21 of 22

Brian,

If you have time, let me know how they ski!  I am recuperating from having my right hip replaced and can appreciate skiing vicariously through your great fortune!

Thanks,

Hawk

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianV View Post
 
 with the total fresh coat of wax, they'll run better than ever I'm sure. 

For about a day or two unless you wax them again. don't wait until you rip out another edge.:)

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