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base structure? base edge angle?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, 

 

I've avoided the bases and base edge angle for the most part and have focused entirely on side edges. However, recently I put a long gash along the p-tex from tip to tail in my GS skis. So I took my base flattener to it and scraped until there was no more high spot on the p-tex. But I'm thinking I should start looking into totally re-flattening the base and putting new structure - maybe the base needs a refresh now that it's been skied on for more than an entire season. 

 

Is this activity something that's reasonable for a person to do themselves with a base flattener? What kind of structuring tool I should use? 

post #2 of 18

what base flattener do you have, the Ski Visions?

post #3 of 18

Good Morning:

 

Me personally, I leave the base grind and primary base edge work to the experts at pierce skate and ski in Bloomington, mn.  hell, I drive about 80 miles each to get there, but its worth it in my opinion.

 

Like you, I wax and maintain my 3 degree side edge.  And, my racey skis go to the shop once a year to get flat, base edges set, and fresh structure for the base.  I do have some base edge tools for polishing little burrs and the like but I only work a small area of the base edge rather than doing the full tip to tail routine.  That's what my friends at pierce recommend.  granted, as far as I know, they have the most precise tuning instruments in the whole state and perhaps even the region.

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post
 

Good Morning:

 

Me personally, I leave the base grind and primary base edge work to the experts at pierce skate and ski in Bloomington, mn.  hell, I drive about 80 miles each to get there, but its worth it in my opinion.

 

Like you, I wax and maintain my 3 degree side edge.  And, my racey skis go to the shop once a year to get flat, base edges set, and fresh structure for the base.  I do have some base edge tools for polishing little burrs and the like but I only work a small area of the base edge rather than doing the full tip to tail routine.  That's what my friends at pierce recommend.  granted, as far as I know, they have the most precise tuning instruments in the whole state and perhaps even the region.


+1

 

Pierce does an awesome job on tuning.  Plus they run free clinics on how to maintain your skis between professional tunes.

post #5 of 18

Hey Thank you for mentioning the clinics, i'll have to look into that and see if I can take advantage of that opportunity; I'd bet they make it worth the trip at least.

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post
 

Hey Thank you for mentioning the clinics, i'll have to look into that and see if I can take advantage of that opportunity; I'd bet they make it worth the trip at least.


You'll definitely get some good pointers, though Eric didn't like it when I asked too many questions (apparently engineers are a pain as customers...).

 

You can sign up here: http://pierceskateandski.com/erics_tuning

post #7 of 18

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post
 

Good Morning:

 

Me personally, I leave the base grind and primary base edge work to the experts at pierce skate and ski in Bloomington, mn.  hell, I drive about 80 miles each to get there, but its worth it in my opinion.

 

Like you, I wax and maintain my 3 degree side edge.  And, my racey skis go to the shop once a year to get flat, base edges set, and fresh structure for the base.  I do have some base edge tools for polishing little burrs and the like but I only work a small area of the base edge rather than doing the full tip to tail routine.  That's what my friends at pierce recommend.  granted, as far as I know, they have the most precise tuning instruments in the whole state and perhaps even the region.


x2 - just had my atomics in there for a stone grind.  Sure it costs about $90 (grind, sidewall plane and custom structure)  but its worth it to get them in a good starting place.

post #9 of 18

What they explained to me is that many amateur tuners do more harm than good when working their base edge. 

post #10 of 18
Base grind is very important. Structure = speed for conditions. I personsonally run a mix combo structure for the area I live. To cover a couple conditions of snow. I put a .5 degree base bevel in so my deburring sesions work longer till I go past a 1* then it's a time for a basic gind to get flat again. When I gind it again I only grind till edges are gound flat till 3/4 of inner edge. This helps in life of ski . Usually i can put a true .5 base bevel back accurately back with less grinding and redo cycle again. I should also say I flipp skis halfway through the day to wear edges evenly as I can. If it's not a slalom ski, there is no left or right ski! So forget thoses stickers they put on skis. Just use them as a marker to swap them over mid day. Élan has left and right skis due to shape and rocker in the skis.these skis I still switch up between carving ang banging bumps for ease of skiing for I do., I hope it helps! Happy holidays
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

what base flattener do you have, the Ski Visions?

 

I have a fk-sks base flattener that's listed on this page: http://www.kunzmann-skitools.de/gb/belag.html 

 

I ended up scraping the base down to get the gouge out... so I probably should add structuring. Is there an amateur way to add structure? I haven't seen a specific tool for structuring. How do you get that nice crosshatch diamond pattern that looks like it comes out of a machine?

 

If I use the base guide to reset the base edge, how do I know when I've actually filed it down enough and am not over-beveling? (I bought the beast base guide)

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

 

I ended up scraping the base down to get the gouge out... so I probably should add structuring. Is there an amateur way to add structure? I haven't seen a specific tool for structuring. How do you get that nice crosshatch diamond pattern that looks like it comes out of a machine?

 

If I use the base guide to reset the base edge, how do I know when I've actually filed it down enough and am not over-beveling? (I bought the beast base guide)

 

sandpaper 220 aluminum-oxide, will give you a decent structure then fibertex and brush out the hairs. it will break water suction so, good enough. it will be linear though, not diamond... works well on race skis.

 

base filing - use both a marker on the edge to see when the edge is filed completely and also keep looking carefully at the base so you don't file the plastic. THEN do the structure

 

cheers

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks Razie! Always helpful. Do you sandpaper in a straight line down the base? Does that create channels that make it hard to steer?

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Thanks Razie! Always helpful. Do you sandpaper in a straight line down the base? Does that create channels that make it hard to steer?
yes, linear - wrap the sandpaper over an edge guide to be sure its flat and go tip to tail, for a linear structure. The channels are very small - they wouldnt influence the turning of the ski, just break the suction from the water.

Although i still sandpaper bases, I actually like this stone more: http://www.tognar.com/6-medium-structure-stone-for-ski-visions-ski-base-flattener/ it doesnt leave any hairs behind. You dont need the entire tool, just this stone. On the other hand, if you are not looking to beat the noram records, so you can just ski those hairs off..... You will see what i mean after a few passes with the sandpaper.

Cheers.
Edited by razie - 12/28/14 at 5:42pm
post #15 of 18
Read about the ruby stones and structuring here - it is very sensible http://skivisions.us/504.html
post #16 of 18

There are many types of polishing stones that one may use.  I use them for flattening, but not much for structure. 

 

Here are some "Ruby" stones for you.  Many grits and sizes can be had.    http://www.borideabrasives.com/product.php?prod=2635

 

post #17 of 18

you love that burred steel scraper, don't ya?

 

:beercheer:

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

you love that burred steel scraper, don't ya?

 

:beercheer:


Yes!  I use file edges over fiber too and sometimes just the file edge scrape to go real deep for wet snow.  Liner rules!  I've done chevron and crosses, but the brushing is a pain!  :beercheer:

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › base structure? base edge angle?