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strong carving/edging - Page 4

post #91 of 95
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post
 

Here's what it comes down to.  You want balance on the outside ski as early as possible. 

BTS... I like a lot of what you've said, but  I think the above statement is a bit broad and can be too easily miscontrued.  I think I would reword it. I think I might say:

 

You want to balance on the outside ski AS SOON AS IT IS APPROPRIATE within the turn development.   A common problem is that skiers, in their attempt to get to the outside ski TOO EARLY they move the CoM away from its ideal track and interrupt any flow they might have had otherwise.  

 

The direction track and travel of the CoM is MUCH more important to pressure and carving than focusing on pressuring the outside ski. When the body is traveling in the right path in relation to the skis pressure distribution is then REGULATED by the relationship between an extended outside leg and a retracted inside. If I want more inside pressure, I merely push down my inside foot (often difficult to do because of existing forces).  If I want more outside pressure I retract my inside a bit more. But the secret sauce that allows all of this to happen is having the CoM in the correct, transitioning place throughout each turn. 

 

Additionally,  I often find myself delaying the transfer of pressure to the outside ski much later than most and am still stable and completely balanced. I don't think of pressuring the outside ski as "stepping on it" as many do, but "setting" it in the snow as I retract my inside leg to do so.  The key to it is how my CoM tracks within the turn.  This enables me to adjust instantly in bad conditions where I might need pr want more pressure on the inside ski.  I take the approach that it isn't all about the outside ski, but adaptations stemming from the CoM tracking in the correct lateral position so that pressure can be regulated thru extension and retraction. 

post #92 of 95

nope, I meant what I said.  But yes, anything can be taken to extremes and beyond.  But most skiers do not have this problem you are suggesting of too much outside ski pressure too soon with some kind of awkward move up the hill to get it.  Most are late.  Most will benefit from awkward exercises that allow them to experience what its like to linger with weight on the LTE of the uphill ski a fraction of a second before tipping into the BTE.  Yes, agree with you they have to learn how to inclinate their legs into the turn while also doing that.  Thus read my entire post as to how.

 

Its also quite possible to do white pass type transitions, or hybrids, where the weight is not completely transferred to the outside ski.  Ok fine, but still balance needs to be maintained at all times, and generally that is not optimized carving or else the NY times wouldn't have made a fancy website showing how Ligety does exactly the opposite of that.  That kind of transition is very useful in many scenarios, but someone trying to carve will be trying to stay on the outside ski as early as possible to bend the hell out of it and crank a turn.  I've gotten pretty proficient at White pass turns but I've also come to realize that while its very useful to be able to make turns on either ski, its not optimal and inspires too much gross "move across" movements of the upper body that ultimately detract from early outside ski pressure and high performance carving.

post #93 of 95
Pretty much with bts on the outside ski issue. I think what you're talking is people desperately pushing or twisting the outside ski. I agree with the com issues, but more pressure on inside can also be had by pulling it in and making sure there's contact with tongue as turn develops.

Lf- I wasn't being sarcastic. People do it, and it works for them quite well
There's advantages and disadvantages to different ways. The prob is people get stuck on the way.

The irony is that many concerned with being fore are usually too aft by their definition and account. So there's something there. Maybe stop trying "being fore" and get ahead down the hill could be worth a try. Doesn't mean "go aft ".
post #94 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterk123 View Post
 

Here is a short vid.  A good example I think of the problems my arms probably cause on ice.  It is a great feeling to have the arms where I do in this vid, but probably not effective on ice.  I also think I need to break the hip a bit more, getting my upper body more vertical.  I think that is what you guys call angulation.  

 

Have at it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROxnniJxa3Y&feature=youtu.be

 

And thank you for taking the time to critique.  I know this subject gets beaten to death.  Pete


Is this the kind of terrain you guys are all talking about?  And the severity of the 'ice'?  Really?

post #95 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterk123 View Post
 

Here is a short vid.  A good example I think of the problems my arms probably cause on ice.  It is a great feeling to have the arms where I do in this vid, but probably not effective on ice.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post

Is this the kind of terrain you guys are all talking about?  And the severity of the 'ice'?  Really?

 

I've made the salient portions of peterk's post more obvious.  

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