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Overnight parking in Jackson Hole

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am looking for a place to park RV for 3 to 4 days in Jackson Hole or near by. While water and electricity is nice, I do not really need it - unit is self sufficient for about 6 days. Last year I saw some RVs on the far car pool lot, do you know if I could park there overnight (does not have to be free)? Also, is there any store, motel or gas station or visitor center in Jackson or near by that lets you park overnight?

post #2 of 11
post #3 of 11

I don't know one way or the other, but you might try calling these guys:

 

http://www.jacksonholechamber.com​

post #4 of 11

Absolutely no camping overnight in any JHMR-owned parking lots...this includes the Village, Crystal Springs, Cody and Ranch lots as well as the Stilson satellite lot.

post #5 of 11
Albertsons in town.
post #6 of 11

This place is just a few miles down the road from Teton Village.  It is an actual RV campground and is open during the winter.  It's a couple hundred steps from a START bus stop.  Seems perfect:

 

http://jacksonholecampground.com/winter-rv-park/​

 

Just my opinion, but I don't know that Albertson's "allows" people to park overnight in their lot.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaman View Post

Albertsons in town.

That will get you a ticket, fast.

 

I'd suggest poaching a hotel parking lot and keeping a low profile.  Lots of RV peeps stay at a hotel every week or so, especially when it is cold.

post #8 of 11

Albertsons and Smiths always have full parking lots.  I've tried to pull an RV into their lots several times in the summer and it's just too tight.  No way are all those shoppers.

 

I stayed here this summer for a night in my 26' motorhome:  http://www.firesidejacksonhole.com/     (edit:  Bob's link is the same place).

 

It's probably the closest RV park to JHMR.  As RV parks go, it was 'meh'.  Easy to miss the turnoff too.

 

Jackson is brutal to RV's in winter - you'd better have a solid winter RV package and some experience in both winter camping and driving those pigs on ice.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much everybody!
post #10 of 11

In case the rest of the thread hasn't killed the winter RV dream here is a post I did in 2011 regarding RV camping in the winter.

 

I am a ski RV veteran with many years experience. I have also seen many unhappy RV renters frozen solid in ski resort parking lots.

It seems like a wonderful idea to wake up, walk across the parking lot and get on the lift but

- Unless you have 4 or more people it isn't cheaper if you add up rental charges, insurance and fuel (8 imperial MPG would be typical)

- You better be really good friends because after a few days in a tiny RV you may want to kill each other

- Most RVs (ie the ones made in the USA) are not made for winter. Their plumbing freezes solid meaning no water, shower or toilet, condensation soaks the interior and they are just generally miserable. Three Canadian built RVs can handle the cold - Triple E, Citation, and Travelaire. My Triple E has been in -25c with no problems. If you want something that works fly to Calgary or Vancouver and rent a Triple E from Go West RV.

- Once you get the RV you have to drive it on snowy and icy mountainous roads. They aren't like driving a car. A 24 foot Class C weighs in at almost 15,000 lbs., it doesn't have real snow tires and is like driving a bill board down the road. The first time you have a 30 km side wind on a white ice road you will see God.

- Yes they have a furnace but it draws at least 7 amps and you batteries are much less efficient due to cold meaning you have to be plugged into 110 volts at least every second day or you kill your batteries. No heat = everything frozen solid. Most ski area don't have plugins and most RV resorts are closed in winter.

- Even if the plumbing in the RV works where do you dump the tanks? Most sanidumps are buried under snow and frozen. Getting water is even more difficult as all outside taps are shut off and you can't drive the RV into a typical heated garage.

 

Having my own RV means I know where to go and how to avoid problems but for a newbie it is a recipe for ruining a perfectly good ski vacation. Renting an RV in winter is certainly an adventure but so is a root canal. 

 

post #11 of 11

And in the case of Jackson, the link Bob Peters posted shows a price of $59 a night for the one place that is open in the winter.  You can get a hotel room for that or a little more.

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Castle Dave View Post
 

In case the rest of the thread hasn't killed the winter RV dream here is a post I did in 2011 regarding RV camping in the winter.

 

I am a ski RV veteran with many years experience. I have also seen many unhappy RV renters frozen solid in ski resort parking lots.

It seems like a wonderful idea to wake up, walk across the parking lot and get on the lift but

- Unless you have 4 or more people it isn't cheaper if you add up rental charges, insurance and fuel (8 imperial MPG would be typical)

- You better be really good friends because after a few days in a tiny RV you may want to kill each other

- Most RVs (ie the ones made in the USA) are not made for winter. Their plumbing freezes solid meaning no water, shower or toilet, condensation soaks the interior and they are just generally miserable. Three Canadian built RVs can handle the cold - Triple E, Citation, and Travelaire. My Triple E has been in -25c with no problems. If you want something that works fly to Calgary or Vancouver and rent a Triple E from Go West RV.

- Once you get the RV you have to drive it on snowy and icy mountainous roads. They aren't like driving a car. A 24 foot Class C weighs in at almost 15,000 lbs., it doesn't have real snow tires and is like driving a bill board down the road. The first time you have a 30 km side wind on a white ice road you will see God.

- Yes they have a furnace but it draws at least 7 amps and you batteries are much less efficient due to cold meaning you have to be plugged into 110 volts at least every second day or you kill your batteries. No heat = everything frozen solid. Most ski area don't have plugins and most RV resorts are closed in winter.

- Even if the plumbing in the RV works where do you dump the tanks? Most sanidumps are buried under snow and frozen. Getting water is even more difficult as all outside taps are shut off and you can't drive the RV into a typical heated garage.

 

Having my own RV means I know where to go and how to avoid problems but for a newbie it is a recipe for ruining a perfectly good ski vacation. Renting an RV in winter is certainly an adventure but so is a root canal. 

 

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