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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › 0.5 vs 1.0 base bevel on racing skis (used for free skiing)
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0.5 vs 1.0 base bevel on racing skis (used for free skiing)

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Team,

Have skied on 1 degree base bevel most of my life. Have a racing background but now am long since retired and own race skis to primarily just free ski on depending on the conditions. 2 winters ago I got a used pair of Rossi WC slaloms 165 and found that they were not very user friendly compared to my previous 5yr old Rossi WC slaloms and the Fischers/Solomons I skied on in college. (felt grabby)

Net it really affects my "glalom" turns and also my ability to feather the top of the glalom turn to scrub speed. At first I thought the skis were just quicker bc tech has changed and potentially not well detuned in the tips... but after more reflection I think it could be the base bevel. I also recently got a pair of what I would call cheater GS skis. (182 Rossi WC 23M side cut from a few seasons ago) They also came with a .5 base bevel. Have not skied yet.

Bottom line I run 1 degree on all my other skis, have pretty much forever and think I shld make the change on these 2 race skis. Goal is really to have them be user friendly and not win NorAms. (FYI have skied on race stock equipment from many manufacturers over the last ~17 yrs so its likely not that I'm not used to how responsive the skis are)n

Thoughts??
post #2 of 16

Similar experience to you: historically 1.0, tried 0.5, and had to de-tune to get down the hill.  Turns out, 0.7 is juuuust right for me!!

post #3 of 16
Had a similar instance when I tried 0 deg on my gs when I used .5 deg. Thought I was going to kill mysef on first run. It's fun to try new things because ya really find out. I mess around with a lot structures for mixed conditions, some work, some don't. Get some pow!
post #4 of 16

#1, Be sure there is no hanging burr.  run an arkansas stone down the base edge flat against the base edge with medium pressure  acpouple of time. 

 

#2, Be sure not under-beveled in tip and tail. Check with a true bar that the .5 is consistent down all base edges  entire ski length.

 

#3. A .5 is too unforgiving for some folks, a true clean 1 degree is very good for free-skiing as long it is no more and has no hanging burr and is consistent.  If you have any alignement issues a .5 can exacerbate the problem.

post #5 of 16

Something else to consider , this may also be related to how they are being used.   If you are consistently driving them on a high edge angle and  working the ski like a race stock slalom is designed, 0.5 works well. It lets you hook up immediately and make the quick change of direction in gates necessary.  If however as you say you are skiing them more in a glalom style free sking and for the most part operating at or above the design radius of the ski a bigger base angle may be more comfortable.  Personally I like 0.5-07 on all my skis because of the  respond but can understand that it does not make it optimal for others 

post #6 of 16
Gonna show my gaperness....."glalom"?
post #7 of 16

More and more east coast shops are doing .5/3 as their standard GS tune. 

post #8 of 16

I have a friend who loves the new skis 'locked in' feel that disappears after they get their first tune.  He lamented about it so I told him to tell the tuner he wants 0 degree bases(even tho I see that as a bad idea).

 

That locked in feel is a 0 degree base edge.  Having every bit of metal on the snow does make for a locked in carve, the trouble is there is no room to slide or smear.

 

The racers I know don't even want 0 degrees, the only ones that I know who like it are mountaineers who never really turn anyway.

 

One is good for recreational skiing, 0.7 or 0.5 are preferred by the gate bashers in their quest for time saved.

post #9 of 16

It's personal taste.  If you like and are used to 1 degree base, you will likely find 0.5 too tight.  I have been hooked on 0.5 base bevel since the mid 80s.  However, if a new pair of skis comes with a 1 degree bevel, I'll leave it at that for a while.  I find 1 is easier to smear turns with and ski bumps with (when you're doing it with decent technique and not treating everything including moguls as a DH race to the bottom that benefits from clean carved turns when turns are necessary).  I just don't like the sloppiness of a 1 degree base.  I don't detune tips and tails either. 

 

If you leave them at 0.5, you might just get used to it.  If you change to 1, you will lose a tiny bit of acuteness and gain a bit more play before neutral becomes left or right turn.  It won't be any great catastrophe.  If you know what you like, go ahead and tune the skis that way.

 

I agree with Atomicman, make sure you don't have a bur or some other issue. 

post #10 of 16

One additional issue can be manmade snow. I have found it extremely unforgiving and problematic with a .5 degree

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks gents -- I'm going back to the OG 1.0 base bevel for both the GS and Slaloms. Fact of the matter is that I basically dont ski gates anymore and mainly just want to look cool while doing nice skivots. 

 

And to answer a question above re:glalom turns -- these are essentially the turns that ski racing coaches make for a living. Basically just arcs that go really far across the hill on slalom skis, follow a GS rhythm but have a much higher turn radius. (Not to be confused with Joeys who do super G turns on slalom skis with the inside ski scissoring and the outside ski speed wobbling) 

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Penguin View Post
 

Thanks gents -- I'm going back to the OG 1.0 base bevel for both the GS and Slaloms. Fact of the matter is that I basically dont ski gates anymore and mainly just want to look cool while doing nice skivots. 

 

And to answer a question above re:glalom turns -- these are essentially the turns that ski racing coaches make for a living. Basically just arcs that go really far across the hill on slalom skis, follow a GS rhythm but have a much higher turn radius. (Not to be confused with Joeys who do super G turns on slalom skis with the inside ski scissoring and the outside ski speed wobbling) 

:beercheer::ROTF

post #13 of 16
It's really a personal preference. I feel a really good sidewall prep for race skis is a must. A hack job will be very jerky. None at all, is way worse. In the Mts. I see a lot of 0 deg to 1deg. Base bevel. Side edge, is their choice.
I say give them what they want, just do it properly and a friendship will build along with the business.
post #14 of 16
0.5 skis very nice as long as you pay attention, when you are tired they can get hooked easily and down you go.

Also tried 0 once, damn thing locks into a turn like it's on rails, but it simply will not skid even when I try, made navigating lift corral a bit interesting.
post #15 of 16
I'd only skied 1/3 up until I got my SL skis from Atomicman that were .7/4 and I fell in love with that.

I had another pair ground towards the end of the season and played around a little and skied them at 0 and it was just horrible.

I borrowed a .5 file guide and tried it but it was still a little too hooky for me, especially here on the artificial snow I ski almost exclusively, but also even on real snow. And since I ski bell to bell several times a week through the season, once I start to get tired at the end of the day I just can't keep the concentration I need to ski at .5 while it's getting dark and the conditions are changing at the same time. I can do it, it's just way too much work to be enjoyable to me.

For the way and where I ski, .7 seems to be a perfect compromise. It lets me hook up hard when I want, and it lets me not hook up and slide my skis around when I want.

1 just feels sloppy now. I just tune everything my wife and I own now to .7, all of her's .7/3 and everything I ski now to .7/4
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

I'd only skied 1/3 up until I got my SL skis from Atomicman that were .7/4 and I fell in love with that.

I had another pair ground towards the end of the season and played around a little and skied them at 0 and it was just horrible.

I borrowed a .5 file guide and tried it but it was still a little too hooky for me, especially here on the artificial snow I ski almost exclusively, but also even on real snow. And since I ski bell to bell several times a week through the season, once I start to get tired at the end of the day I just can't keep the concentration I need to ski at .5 while it's getting dark and the conditions are changing at the same time. I can do it, it's just way too much work to be enjoyable to me.

For the way and where I ski, .7 seems to be a perfect compromise. It lets me hook up hard when I want, and it lets me not hook up and slide my skis around when I want.

1 just feels sloppy now. I just tune everything my wife and I own now to .7, all of her's .7/3 and everything I ski now to .7/4

:beercheer:

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › 0.5 vs 1.0 base bevel on racing skis (used for free skiing)