or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › new skis to match the new boots?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

new skis to match the new boots?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

So after doing some research on here and around I decided to go to Heinos in NJ to get my boots fitted with an open mind and no real set boot. I ended up with a Fischer (not sure of the model number) with only the bottom heat moldable. I also got custom foot beds (I have a high arch they said and just standing in all the boots gave me a cramp the middle part of my foot, but one boot really set it off).

But now I am curious if I should also look into Skis? 
About me: I will maybe ski 6 times this yr (next winter I could be living in colorado, NJ, or TX due to school/ job), I ski blue mostly, then jay peak (2 days probably), and want to hit elk atleast once). I am very conservative and cautious. Last yr I ended up skiing blues and getting into easier blacks at blue. Jay was more of a green and blues.
My friend, who is a little bit better (has skiied longer) got his first pair of boots fitted the day before I and is now hot to trot on getting skis. My mom was never a good skiier but she did do Colorado trips and Vermont trips and said I should wait on the skis just due to lack of skill. He found skis for $190 and bindings for $200 online. Im not sure if that is the best route to go so turning to you guys for some more opinions.

post #2 of 17

I also bought boots last year from Heino's!  Since you're still sort of a beginner, just get some cheapish system skis.  I doubt you need $200 bindings.  My first pair was the regular atomic smoke and it was $224 total.  I recently bought Kabookies for $520 with axial2 bindings though.  Checkout skiessentials.com

post #3 of 17
Who's buying, you or your mother?
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
I ended up buying fischer motive 182s and marker jesper bindings came to 900 or so after tac
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Tombs View Post

I ended up buying fischer motive 182s and marker jesper bindings came to 900 or so after tac


Hi Ryan,

 

I am not sure if I am reading this correctly, but if you ski as you described yourself in the first post you are going to be in trouble with the ski purchase quoted above.  Not knowing much about your height weight I can almost certainly say that the Motives are going to be quite a long ski for a novice-intermediate skiing mostly greens and blues in Jay Peak style terrain. 

 

Likewise, and maybe more importantly, the Marker Jester binding is a very high DIN binding and for your level of skiing your release value may be below the lowest end of that binding.  This will render your bindings un-serviceable if taken to a shop for adjustments.  I am not sure who advised you on this purchase but I would be very careful not to take their advice anymore.  Especially at those prices. 

 

I am happy to help with some suggestions, but the first thing I would do is try and get money back/store credit for those skis and bindings.

 

Sorry for the downer post. 

 

jake

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiessentials View Post
 


Hi Ryan,

 

I am not sure if I am reading this correctly, but if you ski as you described yourself in the first post you are going to be in trouble with the ski purchase quoted above.  Not knowing much about your height weight I can almost certainly say that the Motives are going to be quite a long ski for a novice-intermediate skiing mostly greens and blues in Jay Peak style terrain. 

 

Likewise, and maybe more importantly, the Marker Jester binding is a very high DIN binding and for your level of skiing your release value may be below the lowest end of that binding.  This will render your bindings un-serviceable if taken to a shop for adjustments.  I am not sure who advised you on this purchase but I would be very careful not to take their advice anymore.  Especially at those prices. 

 

I am happy to help with some suggestions, but the first thing I would do is try and get money back/store credit for those skis and bindings.

 

Sorry for the downer post. 

 

jake

height is 6ft 1inch weight is about 250... After talking to people. I realized I am more of a solid intermediate (I made this post basing it off of last years riding). I was at blue mountain (PA). Solid blue skiier on my boots and rental skies, was able to hit blacks but due to me messing with the tightness of my boot (Im new to real boots, I am used to cranking down rentals, I was trying different tightness levels and combinations) I ate it real bad coming down the black. On 170 rentals I was over powering the ski (someone watched me go down the mtn). The skis were "chattering". And also like kicking out from under me.  My din number is an 8.
I was worried that they would be too long, but I trust the advice of people who have over 50 yrs in the industry (boot fitting, etc, not just as skiers). I was looking around at home and every chart is different. It seems like I am either a few cm over or right on the top for my weight, height, and ability.
I am going back after 3 days at jay to give an update, fix boots, just to say thank you for spending about 6 hours with me on boots/ skis (as long as these skis work out). If they are really THAT bad I will then talk to them about a smaller ski.

post #7 of 17


Ok. Knowing your height and weight I am less concerned about the ski length now.  As long as you have been on it and feel comfortable and in control, that is all that is important. 

 

I don't know what size shoe/ski boot you wear.  If your shoe size is around a US 9 or under (27 mondopoint), you will be ok with the Jesters as your charted indicator value DIN will be an 8.  But If your shoe/boot size is bigger than that I would be at least a little hesitant since those bigger sizes will put your DIN at 7 or under, those numbers being pretty much as low as the Jester can go due to the stiffer release spring used in that binding.  The Marker Griffon is essentially the same binding as the Jester with a less stiff spring and some lighter weight components with a DIN range of 4-13; a bit more suitable for a 7-8 release value skier.  The Jester is a 6-16.  Not to mention that it usually runs $100 more than a Griffon. 

 

Check it out with that shop.  See if they'd trade you a Griffon and some store credit for your Jester they sold you.  They can be changed out very easily with no new holes being put in your ski.  And you will have no loss of safety or skiing performance. 

 

Just my .02, proceed as you see fit.

 

-jake

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiessentials View Post


Ok. Knowing your height and weight I am less concerned about the ski length now.  As long as you have been on it and feel comfortable and in control, that is all that is important. 

I don't know what size shoe/ski boot you wear.  If your shoe size is around a US 9 or under (27 mondopoint), you will be ok with the Jesters as your charted indicator value DIN will be an 8.  But If your shoe/boot size is bigger than that I would be at least a little hesitant since those bigger sizes will put your DIN at 7 or under, those numbers being pretty much as low as the Jester can go due to the stiffer release spring used in that binding.  The Marker Griffon is essentially the same binding as the Jester with a less stiff spring and some lighter weight components with a DIN range of 4-13; a bit more suitable for a 7-8 release value skier.  The Jester is a 6-16.  Not to mention that it usually runs $100 more than a Griffon. 

Check it out with that shop.  See if they'd trade you a Griffon and some store credit for your Jester they sold you.  They can be changed out very easily with no new holes being put in your ski.  And you will have no loss of safety or skiing performance. 

Just my .02, proceed as you see fit.

-jake
27.5 mondopoint
and i an set at 8.5. Im going to go to jay and ski everything. And go back after with any complaints. Let me get back and re read everything and give a better answer
post #9 of 17

If you are looking for boots check out Full Tilt before buying.  I know it's an old technology upgraded with the new bells and whistles but the combination and the added new liners are extremely good stuff for people with wide feet.  In the old days I had to get my boots pushed out with a hydraulic piston at great expense, and of course it made the boot look damaged..  Then I skied for years on a set of Nordica Smart Teck 12's, also a good boot for a wide foot but heavy as hell and the draw cables would freeze up with ice so I couldn't get them off easily.  I still wore the liners out because they were so more suitable to my feet.  Then I bought a pair of "Booters" just because they felt good on my feet and in and out is so easy.  My daughter selected a set of "Mary Jane's" and loves them, she also has weird feet and cold foot syndrome, which has mostly gone away.  Most ski boots are designed for a "D" width but the Full Tilts are way more forgiving with their top down design rather than being crammed into a wrap around design.  Ski boots are like hockey skates, if you have wide feet you have to pay $800 or at least for skiers you can by a Full Tilt boot that will fit.

 

In terms of racing, I wouldn't say the Booters are your choice here at least not without a stiffer tongue (which is available on their website, but even with a stiffer tongue I think Full Tilt has other offerings better suited to racing than the Booter, which is a terrain park boot), but for my sloppy all-mountain style they work great hooked to either my 666's (I know, old, but still not packed out due to titanium and still a great ski) or my Fisher Watea's, and both those boards are heavy so I appreciate that the Booters are not.  One of the lightest boots out there because the strength is in the tongue rather than the back or in the case of the previously mentioned N12's a big aluminum frame.

 

On the 666 and why I am still on them, to the critics I would say yes this is a heavy board, but I haven't demo'ed anything better.  They aren't really great at any one thing, but if you are all over the mountain I still haven't seen anything better.  They will pack out soon I imagine, but then what?

 

The Watea's are great in the deep but feel like 2x4's on the rest of the hill so I only pull them out if it's snowed.  When I bought them I thought "these are huge!"  But now I see people skiing corduroy on wider and much floppier skis.  The Watea's are big but they don't chatter until you are going as fast as a car.  The 666's, as old as they are, never chatter.  But they are starting to loose a bit of edge on ice even after tuning so I know they won't last too much longer.

post #10 of 17
He got his boots. First post.
post #11 of 17
But, he had so much information he was anxious to contribute.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post

But, he had so much information he was anxious to contribute.

Well, he had some opinions he wanted to express.
post #13 of 17

Sorry if I wasted your time.  I should have kept it to "if you have wide feet, check out Full Tilt before you buy".

post #14 of 17

The Elan 666 is your daily driver and you thought the Watea was a 2x4.     Interesting.      Which Watea, if you don't mind me asking?

post #15 of 17

Actually, if you have wide feet they are many options, none of which cost $800, unless you opt for Apex.

post #16 of 17

Catunamunch,

 

I don't know it's a 192cm 101mm waist.  When I say 2x4 I mean on hard pack and groomed.  On fresh they are awesome, which is what I bought them for.

 

I can ski them on hard snow but they don't carve like the Elan 666's.  The turning radius on the Wateas is way longer on hard pack.  Still a way awesome ski though, especially in the back bowls with fresh snow.  That's why I have both, they each do a different thing best.

 

I had bought a pair of 169 K2 Apaches to snow plow with my son when he was learning, but my wife has absconded them which is ok by me, I'd rather ski the others.  She likes them because they have better rebound than the "girl" skis she was on before that.  I am not sure what to think but my guess is "girl" skis are too soft for athletic or larger female skiers, some girls need to stay on the boy skis like they always did years ago before the foam core came out.  Many girls like wood.  My wife does.

post #17 of 17

Hey well like I've been saying boot fitting is extremely personal.  For me the Booter has been the best fitting boot I've owned.  Prior to that I had Nordica Smart Tech 12's, heavy and complicated and the cables would freeze up.  Before that I skied traditional boots (mostly Nordica as well) but had to get them stretched.  My wife still skis Nordica, one daughter is in Diablo, the other daughter FT Mary Jane's.  You just have to buy the boot that fits and try them all if you have to.  All I am saying is don't leave Full Tilt off the list, especially if you are not a "D".  I think other commentators have said the same thing.  Keep trying boots until you find the match, and you will have a better day. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › new skis to match the new boots?