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the Volkl RTM series

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

As I continue to dig around for new skis and search for info I wonder about this ski being full rocker. This seems to go against the trend or logic for an all mountain frontside bias ski. Most others in this category offer mostly if not all camber in the ski and then many also incorporate some tip rocker and even some others may offer a bit tail rocker too. But most all in general offer a mostly cambered ski.

 

Yet here Volkl is putting a full gradual rocker in this type of ski. It does get reviewed well for on piste. But I wonder how as it kind of goes against the logic?  The general logic would suggest camber is required on the front side for better stability, carving, edge hold, and overall better frontside power. Yet they (Volkl) seem to be obtaining this with no camber in the ski?. Or at least its not being mentioned that its any problem.

 

I am very curious about this.

post #2 of 9

To each his (her) own. Volkl believes that the shape of the ski helps control the turn and that once you stand on the ski the camber goes away anyway. Personally, I like camber in a "frontside" ski (I like camber in most skis but lets stay on track here). The RTM series has scored very well in many magazine tests so they must be doing something right, personally I find the skis to be better that most in softer/in the snow conditions but  "greasy" in firm/on the snow conditions. So, if you want a ski in this range that is more soft snow biased, they are very good options but if hard snow performance is your goal, there are other choices. YMMV but I would suggest you demo first in the conditions YOU will will be using them in. 

post #3 of 9

Subscribed.  Should be interesting.

 

I've personally never skied a non-cambered ski that I liked, but haven't skied many, and not the RTM.

 

Should be an interesting discussion!

post #4 of 9

It allows them to sell more skis to folks who would not be able to handle a fully cambered ski, flattering rather than insulting their customers.  It also allows folks who do ski well to push the envelope a little more with fewer negative consequences; race skis even have some front rocker.

 

Carving performance does suffer, when compared to a fully cambered ski, even for skis with various forms of front-only rocker, but most folks can't tell the difference.

 

That being said, once you get the ski hooked up it holds pretty well.

 

(edit: have demoed a few of them, including Völks and Salomons - much prefer the cambered skis for hard snow)

post #5 of 9

Although a cambered ski does flatten from the weight of the skier and any additional forces applied in the turn, a stiffer ski underfoot helps to produce a ski that holds better on hard snow conditions and also provides more rebound energy for an aggressive skier to unweight and start the next turn.  Although a rockered ski might be enjoyable in soft snow/powder, it will not hold and edge in icy conditions of provide the rebound energy that a cambered ski will.

 

Not sure I agree with Volkl but I have not skied any of their rockered RTM skis yet but have been told by friends who have that they do not have the same aggressive edge hold and energy that past Volkls have. 

 

Some of the tip and tail rockered skis do hold well but underfoot is still a traditional cambered structure.

 

Bill

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Volkl believes ... that once you stand on the ski the camber goes away anyway. 

Though if that's really Volkl's argument there's a huge hole in it, since camber is effectively still very much present in a flattened ski -- as you know, flattening a cambered ski converts the cambered shape into added tip and tail pressure that would not be there if the ski weren't cambered to start with.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

To each his (her) own. Volkl believes that the shape of the ski helps control the turn and that once you stand on the ski the camber goes away anyway. Personally, I like camber in a "frontside" ski (I like camber in most skis but lets stay on track here). The RTM series has scored very well in many magazine tests so they must be doing something right, personally I find the skis to be better that most in softer/in the snow conditions but  "greasy" in firm/on the snow conditions. So, if you want a ski in this range that is more soft snow biased, they are very good options but if hard snow performance is your goal, there are other choices. YMMV but I would suggest you demo first in the conditions YOU will will be using them in. 

 

Thanks for the well informed answer. That's pretty much on track for following the logic I questioned. So there is no underlying secret success that's really defying the general logic of what more camber offers.

 

I am going to make a good effort to try to get to a demo before I buy a ski but as said in other postings its not going to so easily happen for me as life gets in the way. And I hope if I do make a demo that I'll be able to get on at least a few that I have in mind and close enough to my length and decent enough conditions to make it all worthwhile as possible.

 

Unfortunately I just don't get to ski as even half as much as I did years ago due to resources. But the limited amount of skiing I do get in is mostly east coast frontside . But I do love to mix up the way I ski and where on the mountain I ski. I cruise easy and then I drive hard especially  by the second day of a ski weekend. Anyway one of things about me is that I am on the taller side and heavy 6'1 and 240. Even at my slimest I will be 220. That's a lot of weight on a ski. I am also (as mentioned in other thread) coming from old straight rocks which do offer a lot of spring. I would assume I would require a ski that is on the stiffer side and with more traditional camber just to help with me being on the heavier side of things. This is one of the reasons I asked about this ski. Not sure if more camber always or definitely means more pop or not.

post #8 of 9

I was skeptical of the RTM series as well as I am an east coast skier and was a fan of Volkls.  When I was looking to replace my AC30's, I chose the RTM 81's with out even a single demo, just based on the great reviews I had read and the great pro deal I was able to get.  So far I am not disappointed.  They do ski different than the fully cambered 30's, but somehow Volkl was able to engineer a very playful feel and very good edge hold, provided you tip the ski on edge and pressure it.

 

They are nearly as good at pure carving and edge hold but are better in bumps, soft snow and transitioning between different snow types.  I like em!

 

Rick G

post #9 of 9

I ski the RTM 84's and Gotama, (got a screaming deal on both when mammoth was going bust)..   Both ski's are a blast.   Camber vs no camber,  bottom line if you can ski, you can ski on anything and the RTM 84's rip!   Demo demo demo folks.    

And yes I loved the AC30's .  

Salomon Enduro's were a blast as well, 

And so were the......... you get the picture...... 

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