or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Childrens ski school Q's

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Q1: Should kids carry their own skis and manage their own gear at all times during lesson?

 

The reason why Im asking this is that I was supervising a jr racing camp last week and there was an 8y old girl that was pretty much wining all the time while her mother had to help her with the skis and stuff. The instructor in question, a 30y old single female, was very upset with the situation and gave the kid a hard time. Eventually she managed to get the kid taking care of her skis and standing up and moving with the rest of the group when mother was not arround and that was great offcourse but there is something that really irritates me about the situation. To keep this as short as possible, this brings me to my second Q:

 

Q2: Am I the only one that's trying to help my students with their skis and gear to keep them in a good mood insted of giving them a lesson in life?

 

Or am I the one giving a more important lesson in life? Isnt this sport hard enough as it is? Why be a bitch about it? I never had any children I could not deal with by simply helping them out and giving them a brake when they needed one. And I have always had great return rates.

post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

Q1: Should kids carry their own skis and manage their own gear at all times during lesson?

 

The reason why Im asking this is that I was supervising a jr racing camp last week and there was an 8y old girl that was pretty much wining all the time while her mother had to help her with the skis and stuff. The instructor in question, a 30y old single female, was very upset with the situation and gave the kid a hard time. Eventually she managed to get the kid taking care of her skis and standing up and moving with the rest of the group when mother was not arround and that was great offcourse but there is something that really irritates me about the situation. To keep this as short as possible, this brings me to my second Q:

 

Q2: Am I the only one that's trying to help my students with their skis and gear to keep them in a good mood insted of giving them a lesson in life?

 

Or am I the one giving a more important lesson in life? Isnt this sport hard enough as it is? Why be a bitch about it? I never had any children I could not deal with by simply helping them out and giving them a brake when they needed one. And I have always had great return rates.


I'd saythere's a time and place for it to go either way. In jr racing camp she had better be able to deal with her own stuff. I'd be the guy that would stand there and wait as long as it takes for her to get her %&# together.

 

If it's one kid I'm happy to hand her my poles and take her skis. If it's 8 kids that is not possible and they need to deal with it themselves.

post #3 of 18

At 8, we had to carry and manage our own gear. Wasn't even questioned. If you weren't ready, you didn't go. 

post #4 of 18

IMO, parents should be as far as way as possible during the great majority of most lessons, sporting or otherwise (and any other things dealing with child care). I mean, sometimes it's necessary for parents to be nearby, but kids whine to their parents much much more often than they whine to others. 

post #5 of 18

An 8 year old in race camp? Without a doubt, she should be completely in charge of her own gear. I have about the same age in a seasonal program, and they are totally responsible for handling and carrying their own gear. The only exception has been getting their skis in and out of the gondola racks, because they're not quite tall enough to get their skis in and out efficiently (well, some of them). Heck, when I taught 4-6 year olds, I made them carry their own gear as well. I might pick it up and put it in their arms, but from there it was all them. If the kid is especially small or having a really hard time, I might help them out then. But to start, everybody carries their own gear. 

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies. Looks like Im in the minority here. However, being willing to help kids with skis out of a gondola or hand one kid your poles and take her skis because everyone else would be waiting put you in my camp. Better help out one kid, which would not take me a second of my time, than to have 8 kids and their parrents complaining.

 

There is also a positive effect on the group. Most of the kids feel very good about the fact that they can manage their gear all by themselves. I also point this out so everyone knows how it should be done. And I can only help one at a time so help ME out and carry your own stuff. Works every time.

 

I agree 100%. No parrents close by or helping out. Still, parrents are the ones paying for the lessons and the camps so they need to get something also. At camps the adult people that are trawelling with us are helping all the kids. Acting officially at the mountain as service crew.

 

T

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

Q1: Should kids carry their own skis and manage their own gear at all times during lesson?

 

The reason why Im asking this is that I was supervising a jr racing camp last week and there was an 8y old girl that was pretty much wining all the time while her mother had to help her with the skis and stuff. The instructor in question, a 30y old single female, was very upset with the situation and gave the kid a hard time. Eventually she managed to get the kid taking care of her skis and standing up and moving with the rest of the group when mother was not arround and that was great offcourse but there is something that really irritates me about the situation. To keep this as short as possible, this brings me to my second Q:

 

Q2: Am I the only one that's trying to help my students with their skis and gear to keep them in a good mood insted of giving them a lesson in life?

 

Or am I the one giving a more important lesson in life? Isnt this sport hard enough as it is? Why be a bitch about it? I never had any children I could not deal with by simply helping them out and giving them a brake when they needed one. And I have always had great return rates.

here is my 2 cents from teaching ages 4-12. I usually make 4 to 6 year old carry their skis,(mountain policy) but if they are having trouble i carry it myself. for 7 up it is the kids responsibility to carry the gear unless they seriously struggling with it. Q2, unless the kids are toddlers your carrying of their gear wont really keep them in a good mood. The only time it makes sense to give a kid over 7 with their gear is when they are on the gondula.  

post #8 of 18
Chances are the
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Thanks for the replies. Looks like Im in the minority here. However, being willing to help kids with skis out of a gondola or hand one kid your poles and take her skis because everyone else would be waiting put you in my camp. Better help out one kid, which would not take me a second of my time, than to have 8 kids and their parrents complaining.

There is also a positive effect on the group. Most of the kids feel very good about the fact that they can manage their gear all by themselves. I also point this out so everyone knows how it should be done. And I can only help one at a time so help ME out and carry your own stuff. Works every time.

I agree 100%. No parrents close by or helping out. Still, parrents are the ones paying for the lessons and the camps so they need to get something also. At camps the adult people that are trawelling with us are helping all the kids. Acting officially at the mountain as service crew.

T

It's not the case that we 'won't' help when necessary to solve an immediate and situation specific problem. It's that if the child is in a state where the can't or won't help at all at 8 years old, they just might not be ready that day. We've all taught kids who've for one reason or another had a melt down, etc... It happens and often those wheels were set in motion well before they show up to your class. It's just as a general rule, an 8 year old is expected to be able to deal with their own gear. And yes, I'll certainly help clear a boot, etc... if there's an issue getting into a ski after a fall.
post #9 of 18

As a parent, I'm happy to carry my kids' gear to and from ski team.  I rely on the ski team and related peer pressure to get my kids into the habit of dealing with their own gear, far away from where I might hear the whining.  With around 8 kids per coach, I know they're not going to baby these kids any more than necessary.  Yesterday, my younger daughter carried her own stuff to the gondola without even asking me to do it.  Success.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

Q1: Should kids carry their own skis and manage their own gear at all times during lesson?

 

The reason why Im asking this is that I was supervising a jr racing camp last week and there was an 8y old girl that was pretty much wining all the time while her mother had to help her with the skis and stuff. The instructor in question, a 30y old single female, was very upset with the situation and gave the kid a hard time. Eventually she managed to get the kid taking care of her skis and standing up and moving with the rest of the group when mother was not arround and that was great offcourse but there is something that really irritates me about the situation. To keep this as short as possible, this brings me to my second Q:

 

Q2: Am I the only one that's trying to help my students with their skis and gear to keep them in a good mood insted of giving them a lesson in life?

 

Or am I the one giving a more important lesson in life? Isnt this sport hard enough as it is? Why be a bitch about it? I never had any children I could not deal with by simply helping them out and giving them a brake when they needed one. And I have always had great return rates.


I don't think that they must carry it by their own, as it will distract them in their lessons, this is good to arrange these kinds of sports for the kids at their early ages so as to be more creative in their schools.

post #11 of 18

Where I coach, the kids are required to manage their gear without assistance as a requirement of the program.  The program starting age is 6. There are always time you might have to help them, like getting their skis back on on steep terrain or them not noticing the heel binding is closed after they popped out, but that is it.  As part of the program I teach them how to do those things, but they are little kids and some times get excited and forget.

 

Segbrown is right about the parents keeping their distance and I walk a very fine line on this one.  On one hand, since I have 6 y/os it is sometimes very helpful to have a parent or two around early season to help get the kids up the lift since many of them can't work the bar.  On the other hand, there are a couple kids that have been held back because whenever they were getting challenged ability wise, they went to their parents whining and of course mommy and daddy, though encouraging to have them do it, said, "Oh, that's OK.  I'll just ski her down and meet you at the lift." :eek

 

We have talked to these parents and they eventually got better at it and are less involved.  I will also admit that I'm part of the problem.  Parents can hear me from three trails over.  I'm small but I'm loud.  Sometimes my being loud is mistaken for yelling at the kids instead of to the kids.  Once they get to know my way, all is fine.  I'm also known to be rather strict.  These are the rules and we adhere to them.  You don't have to follow them but you don't get to ski with us either.

 

If I'm teaching a "lesson" to a 8 y/o, the treatment changes as the prerequisite to get a lesson is a desire to learn, but again. it is up to me to show them what they need to do and not be their personal assistant.  I want to teach them to be self reliant on the mountain and not need me around.

 

Ken

post #12 of 18

I think it's kind of like parenting. I could do the dishes in half as much time and with better results than my kids can, but if I take the path of least resistance I am stuck doing their dishes forever. I taught a lesson this week where another instructor had started this kid and gave him every short cut possible. He could not/would not (sometimes it's hard to tell the difference) herringbone or side-step. Couldn't get on the magic carpet by himself or navigate a lift line, but he could power wedge an easy green. Oh yeah, also he'd lie on the ground and cry or yell until you picked him up if he fell. So I got to be the jerk that insisted he learn to do these things himself. Fun times.

post #13 of 18

It's a delicate balance and we will all handle each situation a little differently.  Hopefully none of us is too far to the left or too far to the right.  YM

post #14 of 18

"Give a man a fish and feed him for a day.  Teach a man to fish and feed him for life."   submitted YM

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

"Give a man a fish and feed him for a day.  Teach a man to fish and feed him for life."   submitted YM

Yes, but you're still going to make him carry his fishing rod. Aren't cha?

post #16 of 18

You do realize this thread was recently resurrected?

 

Mike

post #17 of 18

Personally, I try to make a point of realizing as little as possible. So, what's your point?

post #18 of 18

I have been skiing this season with a friends kindergartner & he handles all his equipment himself, even when I offer to help.

Up until the time they are hooked on skiing & realize that it is a special privilege, I will help much as I can (showing them how & why).  I want their energy & focus spent fun & technique.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching