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Another "rent or buy" thread (skis)

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I know, I know, and I HAVE read a lot about this, but I'm still looking for specific opinions for my particular situation. Tomorrow I'll be going to a reputable boot fitter for my first boots, so that is covered - "buy boots first!" Check.

 

The question comes with skis. So far, I've only rented daily. Now that I'll have my own boots, I'd like to skip the daily rental situation. Season leases seem to be what people recommend, but with skis available to buy for less than the price of a lease, it seems like if they are at all decent, it would be a better idea to buy. 

 

Sure, I might outgrow them in the first season (but that seriously depends on how many days I can get out), but I'd still be out less money and I'd have an extra pair to do whatever with, right?  

 

http://www.levelninesports.com/ seems to have lots of options for $250 or less.

 

These, for example, are cheap enough for me not to feel bad about only using for a couple months:

http://www.levelninesports.com/Inoc-X-Carver-System-Skis-Wgpo-100-Bindings

 

Details:

40yr old male

5'10" 195lb (so 165/170cm ?)

low-intermediate on a good day 

these would be for northeast only

days out depends completely on work, but (sadly) no more than 15-20

 

Thanks for telling me why I'm wrong either way. :D

post #2 of 19

It's hard to argue with the price.  If you do buy these, you are thinking of them as replacements for rentals, right?  I'd guess you will move on to something else eventually, but since you are just getting your feet wet and feeling out the sport, you don't have anything else to compare or contrast with.  I can't imagine they would be worse than the average rental, and you have the advantage skipping that process and of bindings set to your specs.  

 

If this makes more sense than renting, I don't see the problem.  

I'd definitely go to 170, though; you are tall enough and heavy enough to move to 180-ish skis for your next pair.  Too short, and they'll feel like unstable ice skates.

post #3 of 19
15-20 days isn't a ton, but it's not nothing; spread 20 days throughout the season with some lessons sprinkled in and you might find yourself missing the responsiveness and/or stability at speed of a non-beginner ski; depending on your athleticism and motivation, you might want an accessible intermediate ski instead of a beginner model.

So I'd suggest demoing at least a few skis to get a feel for what you might like instead of just grabbing the first thing that comes up on a search. On-mountain demos are a higher quality than rentals and you usually can switch skis during the day so you get a feel for the difference between different brands and models. Tell the demo shop guys what you liked or disliked about the ski you just tried and they'll try to give you one that might be a better fit.

I don't know much about men's skis, but in the interest of getting informed input from other members, tell us: how long have you been skiing? What kind of skier are you, and what kind of skier would you like to be? Aggressive, risk-averse, enthusiastic, a lover of cruising easy groomers, dying to ski trees? Do you like speed but find your rentals to be unstable? Do you want to ski gates? Are you a bell-to-bell skier or happy getting a few hours here and there in preparation for apres-ski?
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

It's hard to argue with the price.  If you do buy these, you are thinking of them as replacements for rentals, right?  I'd guess you will move on to something else eventually, but since you are just getting your feet wet and feeling out the sport, you don't have anything else to compare or contrast with.  I can't imagine they would be worse than the average rental, and you have the advantage skipping that process and of bindings set to your specs.  

 

If this makes more sense than renting, I don't see the problem.  

I'd definitely go to 170, though; you are tall enough and heavy enough to move to 180-ish skis for your next pair.  Too short, and they'll feel like unstable ice skates.

 

I'm definitely thinking of them as rental replacements. I also definitely have no idea what I'd be looking for in a ski. For that matter, I only recently realized that I could ask for longer skis at the rental counter. They had been giving me ~140cm skis. Moving up to 165 was a revelation in being able to ski more securely at speeds over…well…stopped.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

15-20 days isn't a ton, but it's not nothing; spread 20 days throughout the season with some lessons sprinkled in and you might find yourself missing the responsiveness and/or stability at speed of a non-beginner ski; depending on your athleticism and motivation, you might want an accessible intermediate ski instead of a beginner model.

So I'd suggest demoing at least a few skis to get a feel for what you might like instead of just grabbing the first thing that comes up on a search. On-mountain demos are a higher quality than rentals and you usually can switch skis during the day so you get a feel for the difference between different brands and models. Tell the demo shop guys what you liked or disliked about the ski you just tried and they'll try to give you one that might be a better fit.

I don't know much about men's skis, but in the interest of getting informed input from other members, tell us: how long have you been skiing? What kind of skier are you, and what kind of skier would you like to be? Aggressive, risk-averse, enthusiastic, a lover of cruising easy groomers, dying to ski trees? Do you like speed but find your rentals to be unstable? Do you want to ski gates? Are you a bell-to-bell skier or happy getting a few hours here and there in preparation for apres-ski?

 

15-20 would be the absolute max though. I seriously doubt I'd get to that, but it IS possible, depending mostly on finances.

 

At this point, I'm not sure I'm secure enough in my [lack of] ability to demo anything. Even some of your questions worry me! Okay, I might be exaggerating a little, but really, as I said above, I'm not sure I ski well enough to know what I'm looking for anyway. Demoing a bunch of different things would just confuse me.

 

As for the questions, after deciding that skiing was impossible and not bothering with it in 7th grade ('87) and living in the south, my wife convinced me to give it a shot again in 2011. I told her the whole time that I would hate every minute of it. Five minutes in, I was completely hooked. Unfortunately, five minutes in, she tore her ACL and was done. That being the case, I skied for the rest of that trip (two more days) with lessons each day, but then didn't ski again that season or next. Finally, the need to be out there took over the guilt and I went back by myself. Total though, I've only done maybe 10 days since then. I want to change that!

 

I'm an extremely careful skier at the moment, despite being not-so-careful in other activities. That's mostly due to lack of confidence in my own ability, those short and scary skis, and fear of injury. An injury to my arm would stop me from working. An injury to my mouth/teeth could mean the end of my career altogether (I'm a musician).

 

In general though, I like speed a lot. I'd love to get to the point of being comfortable on any groomed trail on a mountain. Going off piste, while interesting to me, seems so far off in the future that it isn't worth considering. Gates/bumps/terrain parks/etc. are of little interest to me.

 

The bad news for my skiing is that my work season is busiest between October and May (and last season I was completely booked between Oct. and Mar.). The good news is that when I don't have work, I can go any time. Also, I work all over, so as I get better and worry less about hurting myself before a concert, I'll be able to ski in more places with no travel cost (two seasons ago, I got to ski in Utah). 

 

How's that for a life story? Hopefully it helps….

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenposaune View Post

I'm definitely thinking of them as rental replacements. I also definitely have no idea what I'd be looking for in a ski. For that matter, I only recently realized that I could ask for longer skis at the rental counter. They had been giving me ~140cm skis. Moving up to 165 was a revelation in being able to ski more securely at speeds over…well…stopped.

Well, that makes sense! biggrin.gif In that case, save my advice for some months down the road when you've got your legs under you a little more firmly. It won't be very long, but being a late bloomer myself, I remember not being able to tell whether I liked a ski or not because everything still felt uncertain.

I loved your description of being freezing cold your first day out and still loving it. devil.gif IMO it's at least as important to have fun as to ski well, and the first step toward skiing well is learning to survive--to be able to stop short whenever you have to and turn where you want to, the where it's safe to stop on the trail so as not to block traffic or get run over, how to ski in a crowd as well as how to avoid the crush, how to sensibly and safely cope when you get in a little over your head on something steep or rough, how to avoid injury...and, maybe most of all, how to let go of your ego and keep your sense of humor after a crash. You'll pick it up quickly, but IME it was a lot easier to focus on skills and build confidence once I knew I was in control.

You're gonna have some fun!
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenposaune View Post
 
[snip]
 

As for the questions, after deciding that skiing was impossible and not bothering with it in 7th grade ('87) and living in the south, my wife convinced me to give it a shot again in 2011. I told her the whole time that I would hate every minute of it. Five minutes in, I was completely hooked. Unfortunately, five minutes in, she tore her ACL and was done. That being the case, I skied for the rest of that trip (two more days) with lessons each day, but then didn't ski again that season or next. Finally, the need to be out there took over the guilt and I went back by myself. Total though, I've only done maybe 10 days since then. I want to change that!

 

I'm an extremely careful skier at the moment, despite being not-so-careful in other activities. That's mostly due to lack of confidence in my own ability, those short and scary skis, and fear of injury. An injury to my arm would stop me from working. An injury to my mouth/teeth could mean the end of my career altogether (I'm a musician).

 

In general though, I like speed a lot. I'd love to get to the point of being comfortable on any groomed trail on a mountain. Going off piste, while interesting to me, seems so far off in the future that it isn't worth considering. Gates/bumps/terrain parks/etc. are of little interest to me.

 

The bad news for my skiing is that my work season is busiest between October and May (and last season I was completely booked between Oct. and Mar.). The good news is that when I don't have work, I can go any time. Also, I work all over, so as I get better and worry less about hurting myself before a concert, I'll be able to ski in more places with no travel cost (two seasons ago, I got to ski in Utah). 

 

How's that for a life story? Hopefully it helps….

Glad you are having fun.  Has your wife gotten back on the slopes?  I'm also in the south, but grew up in New York and got the bug a long time ago.  Didn't have a chance to ski much until relatively recently (after age 50).

 

You might find some useful info in this thread for those who discover skiing after age 40.

http://www.epicski.com/t/114722/tips-for-beginners-over-40-or-50-or

 

If a free demo day happens to fit in your schedule, give it a shot.  I was surprised how different skis could feel.  At the time, I was an intermediate only skiing 5-10 days a season on small hills in the southeast.  Also a good chance to try the same ski in different lengths.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

 

I don't really expect anyone to have firsthand experience with these, but I've seen good comments about higher level Head Rev skis. As a stepping stone, might the Rev 70 be a better option than the ones linked above?  

 

http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Rev-70-Skis

 

There are also these, as a slightly more expensive option (depending on bindings): http://www.levelninesports.com/Fischer-Viron-Fire-Skis

 

I bought boots today, so I'm getting more and more excited to DO something (except that I have to work all next week)!

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


Well, that makes sense! biggrin.gif In that case, save my advice for some months down the road when you've got your legs under you a little more firmly. It won't be very long, but being a late bloomer myself, I remember not being able to tell whether I liked a ski or not because everything still felt uncertain.

I loved your description of being freezing cold your first day out and still loving it. devil.gif IMO it's at least as important to have fun as to ski well, and the first step toward skiing well is learning to survive--to be able to stop short whenever you have to and turn where you want to, the where it's safe to stop on the trail so as not to block traffic or get run over, how to ski in a crowd as well as how to avoid the crush, how to sensibly and safely cope when you get in a little over your head on something steep or rough, how to avoid injury...and, maybe most of all, how to let go of your ego and keep your sense of humor after a crash. You'll pick it up quickly, but IME it was a lot easier to focus on skills and build confidence once I knew I was in control.

You're gonna have some fun!

 

I've already had fun, so I look forward to getting good enough to not worry so much! At least now I'm pretty confident in my ability to stop…and I'm not too embarrassed to bail completely if I need to. :D

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Glad you are having fun.  Has your wife gotten back on the slopes?  I'm also in the south, but grew up in New York and got the bug a long time ago.  Didn't have a chance to ski much until relatively recently (after age 50).

 

You might find some useful info in this thread for those who discover skiing after age 40.

http://www.epicski.com/t/114722/tips-for-beginners-over-40-or-50-or

 

If a free demo day happens to fit in your schedule, give it a shot.  I was surprised how different skis could feel.  At the time, I was an intermediate only skiing 5-10 days a season on small hills in the southeast.  Also a good chance to try the same ski in different lengths.

 

I've definitely looked at that thread- in fact, it might be open in another window right now. I've been trying to work some more ski-specific exercises into my regular gym routine to minimize my chances of getting hurt. I've never broken or sprained anything, and I'd prefer not to start now!

 

Unfortunately, my wife has been too worried about her knee to go back. I guess it wasn't bad enough to need surgery so she didn't have it, but it is still weak. Combine that with generally being accident-prone, and her worries are not unfounded. I've been trying to get her to at least try the tiniest hill again, but I don't want to push her too much (or it'll be MY fault when the hurts herself again).

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenposaune View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Glad you are having fun.  Has your wife gotten back on the slopes?  I'm also in the south, but grew up in New York and got the bug a long time ago.  Didn't have a chance to ski much until relatively recently (after age 50).

 

You might find some useful info in this thread for those who discover skiing after age 40.

http://www.epicski.com/t/114722/tips-for-beginners-over-40-or-50-or

 

If a free demo day happens to fit in your schedule, give it a shot.  I was surprised how different skis could feel.  At the time, I was an intermediate only skiing 5-10 days a season on small hills in the southeast.  Also a good chance to try the same ski in different lengths.

 

I've definitely looked at that thread- in fact, it might be open in another window right now. I've been trying to work some more ski-specific exercises into my regular gym routine to minimize my chances of getting hurt. I've never broken or sprained anything, and I'd prefer not to start now!

 

Unfortunately, my wife has been too worried about her knee to go back. I guess it wasn't bad enough to need surgery so she didn't have it, but it is still weak. Combine that with generally being accident-prone, and her worries are not unfounded. I've been trying to get her to at least try the tiniest hill again, but I don't want to push her too much (or it'll be MY fault when the hurts herself again).

It does take work to strengthen the right areas to making skiing without an ACL something that is fun, as opposed to a time for worry.  If she wants to do some reading about how it can be done, point her to these threads about my experience in the last few years.  I'm close to 60 and a much stronger skier now than I was before.  It did help that I'm retired, so making the time for improving my fitness with an eye towards advanced skiing was not that difficult.  I also started taking lessons from very experienced instructors on a much more regular basis.

 

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/learning-to-be-a-coper-without-an-acl.14847/

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/no-acl-no-surgery-no-problem-my-new-normal-as-a-coper.15049/

 

The set of exercises I found most useful when I started looking around was Bumps for Boomers, a group out in Colorado.  There is a self-evaluation that can be done to see what areas need the most work.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

It does take work to strengthen the right areas to making skiing without an ACL something that is fun, as opposed to a time for worry.  If she wants to do some reading about how it can be done, point her to these threads about my experience in the last few years.  I'm close to 60 and a much stronger skier now than I was before.  It did help that I'm retired, so making the time for improving my fitness with an eye towards advanced skiing was not that difficult.  I also started taking lessons from very experienced instructors on a much more regular basis.

 

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/learning-to-be-a-coper-without-an-acl.14847/

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/no-acl-no-surgery-no-problem-my-new-normal-as-a-coper.15049/

 

The set of exercises I found most useful when I started looking around was Bumps for Boomers, a group out in Colorado.  There is a self-evaluation that can be done to see what areas need the most work.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises


Thanks. Those look like good sites and I'll show her. I don't hold out much hope for her really working at it though. She doesn't really have time for any decent regimen with her work schedule and long commute. Fortunately, she's now fairly happy to sit in a room or lodge with hot chocolate while I ski :devil: (though I would like some company- maybe it's time to start convincing friends!).

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenposaune View Post
 
Thanks. Those look like good sites and I'll show her. I don't hold out much hope for her really working at it though. She doesn't really have time for any decent regimen with her work schedule and long commute. Fortunately, she's now fairly happy to sit in a room or lodge with hot chocolate while I ski :devil: (though I would like some company- maybe it's time to start convincing friends!).

Stick around and you may well find that there are EpicSki members who ski in your area.  Since my husband is a non-skier, I'm always on the lookout for new ski buddies.  He doesn't even go along but stays home and takes care of the dog and cat.

 

Even if she only does some simple exercises, that's a good idea for general day-to-day living.  Doing something for 10-15 minutes every day is worth considering.

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tenposaune View Post

 
Stick around and you may well find that there are EpicSki members who ski in your area.  Since my husband is a non-skier, I'm always on the lookout for new ski buddies.  He doesn't even go along but stays home and takes care of the dog and cat.

Even if she only does some simple exercises, that's a good idea for general day-to-day living.  Doing something for 10-15 minutes every day is worth considering.

+1. Going around with a bad/missing ACL without increasing other support for the knee is a recipe for serious grief down the road, especially if she's pretty sedentary. If she gets a sensible routine going, she could probably get away with 30 minutes a few times a week that she could perform in pieces anywhere she happens to have a few free minutes.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

I just thought I'd update this since I've actually done something about the situation. For better or worse, I bought these: http://www.levelninesports.com/Gpo-Cross-X2-Carver-Skis-Wgpo-100-Bindings in the 170cm length and these poles: https://www.levelninesports.com/Goode-2015-Summit-Ski-Poles

 

Of course, each of the days that it was possible for me to ski before the new year was HORRIBLE wherever I was at the time and I was hesitant to be out of my tiny comfort zone on completely new equipment, so I didn't get to ski until last week. The good news is that I've gotten a few days in locally this week and have some time scheduled in VT next time I'm free (not until March, unfortunately). 

 

I have to say that whether or not what I bought is decent, it is worlds better than the rental equipment I've used for the last few years. I feel like I've gotten closer to a "real" skier (vs a completely incompetent noob careening down the hill) in the last three days than I had in years past. I'm sure the boots are the biggest difference, but the longer skis seem to make [almost] everything easier too.

 

I'm updating this in case another beginner on the fence is searching and wondering whether or not to stick with daily rentals or do something else. DO SOMETHING ELSE! NOW! I'm sure season ski rentals are best for most people, but no matter what, get out of those rental boots and off of those short and (possibly) ill-maintained on-site daily rentals. It does make a difference.

 

Thanks for the responses and the encouragement.

post #13 of 19

I'm leery of buying no-name skis.  If you get these INOC, buy from a place with an excellent return policy like Amazon.  The ski length depends on your ability level and strength, and how much backbone the maker built into the skis.  For your size and these skis, I'd try the 170.  If they feel like 2x4s on your feet, just unresponsive but otherwise OK, return them for the 160s.  If they feel just horrible check that they are in a good state of tune--the bottoms flat and the edges properly shaped.  Any good shop can show you how to check this.  If they are well tuned and still feel horrible, get your money back.

http://www.amazon.com/Carver-System-Skis-GPO-Bindings/dp/B00KWM69GK

 

I'm 6', 185#, very good skier, and the method I've found for choosing a ski length is to get one length less than the max in that size.  The longest skis in each top-level line are built for the strongest, biggest, fastest guy on the mountain.  That ain't me.   My carver ski line has a max of 178.  I've very happy on the 170s (but these would have way too much backbone in them for you at your stage of development).  My powder skis have a max of 186, and the 180s are just right for me.  These skis in these lengths would not be right for you, but I hope you see how the size of each ski line and the way they're built matters with the size chosen.

post #14 of 19

tenposaune,

 

Wish you the best with your ski choice.

 

 

 

What do other people think of these skis for me as a beginner/intermediate skier for use on groomed trails in typical icy/hard packed conditions of the North East?

 

(1)

Dynastar Chrome 68 Skis + Xpress 10 Bindings 2014

$239 from Evo

Tip/Waist/Tail: 124/68/104

Turning radius: 12m

 

 

Available in 149/156/163/170 cm lengths

 

(2)

The Head Rev 70 with Salomon 2015 Z12 Ski Bindings Black/Blue 80mm Brake

~$218 ($99 ski / $119 binding) from levelninesports

Tip/Waist/Tail: 123/70/106

Turning radius: 12.8m

 

Available in 156/170 cm lengths

 

 

I would use the skis in the North East, primarily NY/PA since I would drive from NJ to get to the slopes.

 

Some background information: (Apologize in advance for the wordiness)

 

I am 5'11" (180cm) Weigh ~230lbs (although I am working towards getting to 180-190lbs)

 

I skied in the North East.

Last 2 years: I skied 4 days at Whitetail (2014 Feb 15-16 & 2015 Feb 14-15) and 1 day at Shawnee (2015 Mar 17).

Prior to that I have only skied an additional 3-4 between NY (Mt Cortina I think) and NJ (I forget exactly were) over the previous 25 years (starting late 80s)

 

I can ski the green runs at Whitetail without trouble. I tried 2 blue trails (not including Stalker) this year (Snow Dancer / Limelight) but found the trails too icy for my ability.

Hockey stops are no problem.  I use it when I need to scrub speed. I need to work with my parallel skiing.  It is not bad, but I know it can be improved.  I need to keep forward on my skis (feel pressure on the shins of my boots). I turn by primarily skidding the skis on the snow, but I would like to carve.

 

I want to ski better and more often.  Listening to a friend's advice (get good boots first with a boot fitter), I decided to get a boot fitted for me. (Found a boot fitter at SkiBarn in NJ and chose SALOMON X PRO 90) The boots fit snug as a firm handshake.  They actually were smaller (26.5) than what I rented at Whitetail (28.5) and probably stiffer as well.

 

I could not wait to use the boots skiing so I went to Shawnee this week (2015 Mar 17).  After some minor adjustments with bindings and using thinner socks (I originally tried to use thicker wool socks, but it became uncomfortable for my feet). I think I skied well (for me) on the greens and some blues.  (I thought Shawnee's upper mountain blues were as easy (or easier than) as the greens at Whitetail although Lower Delaware had a part that was more difficult than the blues I tried at Whitetail.)

 

The snow was softer and more slushy(? not sure of right term) on Shawnee than Whitetail. (Shawnee had warmer weather 45°-50° F vs sub-32° F at Whitetail). It was great with few people on the slopes although only one lift (High Speed Quad == Tomahawk - Express) was operating that day.  I enjoyed my skiing.  I think I could make a better comparison if the snow was similar at both places.  At times I thought it was difficult to move through the softer snow at Shawnee.

 

Another difference:  At Whitetail I skied on 160s/150s Elans (not sure of type, but I think they were Exar e-rise).  At Shawnee, I used a 170cm Elan Exar e-rise 120/77/104 (15.8m) 

 

A side note:  Shawnee could be tricky when packed with skiers since most of the trails meet in the middle of the mountain (Indian Queen & Meadows) and all the green trails funnel into two then one green trail (Lower Pennsylvania & Minisink funnel into Greenhouse).

 

Thanks in advance for your constructive advice.

post #15 of 19
Lessons?
post #16 of 19

Sibhusky,

 

Thanks for reminding me.

 

I had two 60-90 minute small group lessons at Whitetail (one this year and one last year).

 

I had a lesson back in the 80s at Cortina.

 

The lessons at Whitetail did help improve my skiing to the point that I was comfortable to ski some blue trails.  

 

Steeper blue are more challenging for me since I need to make my turns quicker (to avoid getting too much speed to quickly).

 

I might look to get to the slopes on Monday since the Poconos are getting 3-6 inches of snow on Friday. (I can not get there this weekend.)

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

I obviously can't be of help with your specific choices, but I will say that as a skier in pretty much the same boat as you (similar size, similar ability, similar area), I'm not sure that you can go wrong for the price. I've loved having my own skis this season and despite them being cheap and no-name, they've felt WAY better than the rentals I had been using and have let me concentrate on my own shortcomings every time I've gone out rather than the skis'. Since you specifically mentioned ice, I'll add that ice is somewhat less scary with real edges. 

 

If I get to ski a good amount next season, I might do a demo day to try other skis as a comparison, but right now I still don't feel like I know enough to know what I'm missing. I haven't regretted the purchase AT ALL.

 

Now I think I'll go use them again today. :D

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GreyPilgrim View Post
 

tenposaune,

 

Wish you the best with your ski choice.

 

 

 

What do other people think of these skis for me as a beginner/intermediate skier for use on groomed trails in typical icy/hard packed conditions of the North East?

 

(1)

Dynastar Chrome 68 Skis + Xpress 10 Bindings 2014

$239 from Evo

Tip/Waist/Tail: 124/68/104

Turning radius: 12m

 

 

Available in 149/156/163/170 cm lengths

 

(2)

The Head Rev 70 with Salomon 2015 Z12 Ski Bindings Black/Blue 80mm Brake

~$218 ($99 ski / $119 binding) from levelninesports

Tip/Waist/Tail: 123/70/106

Turning radius: 12.8m

 

Available in 156/170 cm lengths

 

 

I would use the skis in the North East, primarily NY/PA since I would drive from NJ to get to the slopes.

 

Some background information: (Apologize in advance for the wordiness)

 

I am 5'11" (180cm) Weigh ~230lbs (although I am working towards getting to 180-190lbs)

 

I skied in the North East.

Last 2 years: I skied 4 days at Whitetail (2014 Feb 15-16 & 2015 Feb 14-15) and 1 day at Shawnee (2015 Mar 17).

Prior to that I have only skied an additional 3-4 between NY (Mt Cortina I think) and NJ (I forget exactly were) over the previous 25 years (starting late 80s)

 

I can ski the green runs at Whitetail without trouble. I tried 2 blue trails (not including Stalker) this year (Snow Dancer / Limelight) but found the trails too icy for my ability.

Hockey stops are no problem.  I use it when I need to scrub speed. I need to work with my parallel skiing.  It is not bad, but I know it can be improved.  I need to keep forward on my skis (feel pressure on the shins of my boots). I turn by primarily skidding the skis on the snow, but I would like to carve.

 

I want to ski better and more often.  Listening to a friend's advice (get good boots first with a boot fitter), I decided to get a boot fitted for me. (Found a boot fitter at SkiBarn in NJ and chose SALOMON X PRO 90) The boots fit snug as a firm handshake.  They actually were smaller (26.5) than what I rented at Whitetail (28.5) and probably stiffer as well.

 

I could not wait to use the boots skiing so I went to Shawnee this week (2015 Mar 17).  After some minor adjustments with bindings and using thinner socks (I originally tried to use thicker wool socks, but it became uncomfortable for my feet). I think I skied well (for me) on the greens and some blues.  (I thought Shawnee's upper mountain blues were as easy (or easier than) as the greens at Whitetail although Lower Delaware had a part that was more difficult than the blues I tried at Whitetail.)

 

The snow was softer and more slushy(? not sure of right term) on Shawnee than Whitetail. (Shawnee had warmer weather 45°-50° F vs sub-32° F at Whitetail). It was great with few people on the slopes although only one lift (High Speed Quad == Tomahawk - Express) was operating that day.  I enjoyed my skiing.  I think I could make a better comparison if the snow was similar at both places.  At times I thought it was difficult to move through the softer snow at Shawnee.

 

Another difference:  At Whitetail I skied on 160s/150s Elans (not sure of type, but I think they were Exar e-rise).  At Shawnee, I used a 170cm Elan Exar e-rise 120/77/104 (15.8m) 

 

A side note:  Shawnee could be tricky when packed with skiers since most of the trails meet in the middle of the mountain (Indian Queen & Meadows) and all the green trails funnel into two then one green trail (Lower Pennsylvania & Minisink funnel into Greenhouse).

 

Thanks in advance for your constructive advice.

post #18 of 19

tenposaune,

 

Thanks for your feedback.

 

I'll check a few local ski shops and work to determine the type of skis that are best for me at my current skill levels and realistic possibility of improvement.

 

I am currently leaning more towards the Head Rev 70s with bindings.

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

I was leaning strongly toward those when I first looked but they weren't available in 170s when I was ready to buy.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GreyPilgrim View Post
 

tenposaune,

 

Thanks for your feedback.

 

I'll check a few local ski shops and work to determine the type of skis that are best for me at my current skill levels and realistic possibility of improvement.

 

I am currently leaning more towards the Head Rev 70s with bindings.

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