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Instruction based on body mechanics

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I just went to a talk from Kim Hewitt who is an instructor/ER doctor.

 

Over the years he saw injuries from both sides of the injured.

 

He analyzed the injuries and saw the mechanics of the human skeleton and how they move.  Isolating each joint area - ankle/foot - knee - femur/hip he identified each capable movement and identified effective skiing movement from the feet up and movement that leads to injury.

 

It was a rather simple presentation that summed up a complex equation.  It was also a pitch for a workshop next month.

 

The main idea is to simplify instruction into basic movements effective to skiing with dynamic movement in balance.  His home base stance was immediately dismissed because that is one position in the effective movement continuum keeping the body 'stacked' and the skis weighted effectively throughout the turn process.

 

Have any Bears heard of this new model?

I found this site that has many of the same type imagery in his presentation.

 

http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/basic_mechanics.html

 

This appears to be a direct answer to my criticism of PSIA instruction comparing it to Scientology.  First you go and spend an arm and a leg on a wee piece of the big picture.  Subsequent audits and subsequent payments later you have an incrementally larger picture.

 

I realize skiing is a complex counterintuitive movement that has a myriad of sensations that must be analyzed while implementing movements not drilled into muscle memory.  This incremental approach is the only way to absorb everything without being overwhelmed so it is not a fair comparison.

post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

I just went to a talk from Kim Hewitt who is an instructor/ER doctor.

 

Over the years he saw injuries from both sides of the injured.

 

He analyzed the injuries and saw the mechanics of the human skeleton and how they move.  Isolating each joint area - ankle/foot - knee - femur/hip he identified each capable movement and identified effective skiing movement from the feet up and movement that leads to injury.

 

It was a rather simple presentation that summed up a complex equation.  It was also a pitch for a workshop next month.

 

The main idea is to simplify instruction into basic movements effective to skiing with dynamic movement in balance.  His home base stance was immediately dismissed because that is one position in the effective movement continuum keeping the body 'stacked' and the skis weighted effectively throughout the turn process.

 

Have any Bears heard of this new model?

I found this site that has many of the same type imagery in his presentation.

 

http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/basic_mechanics.html

 

This appears to be a direct answer to my criticism of PSIA instruction comparing it to Scientology.  First you go and spend an arm and a leg on a wee piece of the big picture.  Subsequent audits and subsequent payments later you have an incrementally larger picture.

 

I realize skiing is a complex counterintuitive movement that has a myriad of sensations that must be analyzed while implementing movements not drilled into muscle memory.  This incremental approach is the only way to absorb everything without being overwhelmed so it is not a fair comparison.

 

Buttinski, there is nothing new in the skiing "model" on the site you have linked above.  In fact, it's pretty "old" stuff.  

Do you think a person can learn to ski well more easily from reading that site, instead of working in person, on snow, with a teacher who has experience teaching others how to ski?

post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post

 

This appears to be a direct answer to my criticism of PSIA instruction comparing it to Scientology.  First you go and spend an arm and a leg on a wee piece of the big picture.  Subsequent audits and subsequent payments later you have an incrementally larger picture.

 

Learning a subject takes time. Skiing is a domain in its own right, like cooking, Spanish, dancing, mathematics, etc. And while each of these subjects varies in complexity, they all take more than a 1.5h lesson to understand the big picture. (In my Spanish degree, it took at least a semester before I understood the structure of the language.)

 

Given that the average skier skis 7.5 days/year and devotes minimal time to lessons, the quandary is should instructors teach a wholistic model, or instead use tactics to develop the skier's weakest domain and get some concrete improvement? A good instructor does a bit of both, but above all else, needs to squeeze out some improvement in that lesson. 

 

There are tons of skiing books out there for your perusal. It's a great idea for a keener like yourself to pick one up as it'll give you that "big picture" that you're looking for. I think Lito Tejada-Flores' book is good, and if you can get past the vitriol, so is some of Harb's stuff. (just watch out for anything that sounds too dogmatic. If it sounds dogmatic, it's worth re-assessing.) 

 

I did peruse the site you posted, and while some of the content is accurate, I'd disagree with some of the author's views on stance. Several of the images are a bit befuddling as well.

 

Keep seeking out more information! The more you learn, the more you get out of each lesson. 

post #4 of 4

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