or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

blue-black runs? - Page 2

post #31 of 46

I would say the Paranoids chutes at Mammoth would qualify.  So steep that when you are standing across the slope you can reach out and touch uphill side, no bumps and no trees.

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NedGirl View Post
 

I would say the Paranoids chutes at Mammoth would qualify.  So steep that when you are standing across the slope you can reach out and touch uphill side, no bumps and no trees.


How's the run-out?

post #33 of 46

Actually, you carry quite a bit of speed into the runout, and it still descends slightly, so pretty easy skiing right back into Chair 23.  Of course, in deep powder, it would be a different story.  

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NedGirl View Post
 

I would say the Paranoids chutes at Mammoth would qualify.  So steep that when you are standing across the slope you can reach out and touch uphill side, no bumps and no trees.

 

Yep - looks pretty steep to me!

 

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NedGirl View Post
 

Mary Jane is also nothing but bump runs, so if you're not comfortable with skiing moguls, even the blue (or blue-black) will probably be challenging.

 

To be fair, Jane's blues aren't bump runs and the only thing challenging about them is keeping an edge on the hard-scrape.

post #36 of 46
Thread Starter 

Anyone here familiar with the blue runs on Peak 6 at Breck?  Map shows eleven blue runs on it.  Which would be he more challenging of these?  I'm only going to be at Breck for two days and want to focus on the higher-rated blues. Using Andy's guide I had picked which I wanted to hit from the other peaks but it didn't have anything on Peak 6 due to the guide being a bit dated.   

post #37 of 46

If you go left off the Kensho chair you are going to end up in a giant bowl.  From there you can pick a steeper or shallower line as you are comfortable with and or avoid or go near any obstacles.

 

If you go right off the chair you will be on a groomed surface of fairly consistent pitch until you hit the tree line.  If you go farther skiier's left you will get into less groomed snow which may or may not be more challenging depending on the current conditions.

 

As for the handful of blue runs below the tree line, I didn't notice anything that distinguished them too much in terms of difficulties.  Daydream and especially Nirvana seemed to have better snow for longer because the terrain naturally funnels most people away from these trails.

post #38 of 46

The blue runs on Peak 6 in my opinion are under-rated based on the average ratings across the rest of the mountain.  The blues on Peak 6 would qualify as "blue-black" when they used to have that rating.  They are actually more difficult than the groomed black runs on Peak 10.  The biggest reason why the blues on Peak 6 ski more difficult than they are rated is because of the above treeline exposure and snow conditions.  Above treeline the snow, despite being groomed is more susceptible to wind drifting, thin spots, irregular features, and hard-pack.  Below treeline they ski more like the rest of the blues on the mountain.   Peak 7 blues seem to be some of easiest, ho-hum cruising blues on the mountain.  Peak 6 blues are worthy of black in comparison to Peak 7 blues.

post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by afski722 View Post
 

Peak 7 blues seem to be some of easiest, ho-hum cruising blues on the mountain.

 

Easy? Yes. Ho-hum?  Disagree. It has those great rollers, and plenty of options to duck into the trees for a few turns. Much more fun, to me, than your typical blue that keeps pretty much the same pitch from top to bottom.

post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by afski722 View Post
 

The blue runs on Peak 6 in my opinion are under-rated based on the average ratings across the rest of the mountain.  The blues on Peak 6 would qualify as "blue-black" when they used to have that rating.  They are actually more difficult than the groomed black runs on Peak 10.  The biggest reason why the blues on Peak 6 ski more difficult than they are rated is because of the above treeline exposure and snow conditions.  Above treeline the snow, despite being groomed is more susceptible to wind drifting, thin spots, irregular features, and hard-pack.  Below treeline they ski more like the rest of the blues on the mountain.   Peak 7 blues seem to be some of easiest, ho-hum cruising blues on the mountain.  Peak 6 blues are worthy of black in comparison to Peak 7 blues.

that's just the type of info I was looking for.  Thanks!  I was planning on hitting a few of the blacks on Peak 10 that used to be rated blue-black.  I had also seen the blues on Peak 6 that were above the treeline and was intrigued at chance to try some trails way up there.  Hope to give them a shot.

post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by afski722 View Post
 

The blue runs on Peak 6 in my opinion are under-rated based on the average ratings across the rest of the mountain.  The blues on Peak 6 would qualify as "blue-black" when they used to have that rating.  They are actually more difficult than the groomed black runs on Peak 10.  The biggest reason why the blues on Peak 6 ski more difficult than they are rated is because of the above treeline exposure and snow conditions.  Above treeline the snow, despite being groomed is more susceptible to wind drifting, thin spots, irregular features, and hard-pack.  Below treeline they ski more like the rest of the blues on the mountain.   Peak 7 blues seem to be some of easiest, ho-hum cruising blues on the mountain.  Peak 6 blues are worthy of black in comparison to Peak 7 blues.

Totally agree with the Peak 6 description. I only went to Peak 6 once last season and it was hard pack and icy in spots with howling winds. Certainly tougher than a few of the blacks at Breck that I have been on. I will take a mogul run any day over a steepish-icy run!

post #42 of 46
As you get off the Kensho chair, ski either down the liftline or lookers tright. Those are good intermediate runs with (usually) good snow. Lookers left into the bowl is usually filled with malshaped hard scrapped-off bumps.

Personally, I think the above tree line terrain on peak 6 is all black. I believe Breck rated it as blue to create the impression that the peak 6 expansion was about adding intermediate terrain. In fact, it appears to have been about adding amazing expert terrain and laying claim to the best steeps in the northern mountains of CO. Grantrd, they require a hike, but most great things in life require effort.

Mike
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Oh, I can imagine a blue bump run.  I just can't imagine a double black that is smooth and has no trees (e.g. #33)

I was on a double black today (Breck's Horseshoe bowl) that had no bumps because of the snow blown in the last couple days. No trees either.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I was on a double black today (Breck's Horseshoe bowl) that had no bumps because of the snow blown in the last couple days. No trees either.

I love bowling when the snow is blown in. So fun!
post #45 of 46
What may be a blue at one area could be a black at another, there is no real standard, they are all based upon the ski area.

It is the black and blue runs that hurt.
post #46 of 46

Granite Chief at Squaw has been closed all week because the double blue groomers have too little snow to groom and are too icy to be safe. But KT22's West Face, a true double black has been open. Ratings, which are permanent, depend mainly on pitch, and sometimes on obstacles. Difficulty depends more on snow conditions than anything else. Don't confuse the two. Where I ski runs that are skiing harder than usual will be marked with bamboo "caution" or "expert only" signs, warnings on the chalkboard at the bottom of the lift, or a closure rope. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion