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Design My Post Op Training Regimen

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
35 days ago I was in what for me was peak physical shape from conditioning beginning in April (end of last ski season). Routines included weights (whole body including 3 x body weight leg presses, heavy core), variety of box jumping, bongo board, cycling, stairclimber with assortment of angle pushes and catches and Doberman chasing and catching.

32 days ago I had unplanned surgery to remove 4" section of congenitally kinked L intest. Recovery smooth, uneventful and faster than expected. Off pain meds 2 days ago. Expecting to get back on skis in 1-2 weeks. Doctor advises additional 1-2 weeks before strenuous activity. I may or may not ignore that based on how I feel, experience with prior above-waist sports surgeries and med advice on those, etc. (doc recommendations overly conservative).

I am 52 years old, no injury history below waist, physically comparable to younger guys and north of 80 days skiing last year. I plan on masters racing through the season. My troop began on snow drills December 1 and I'll have catching up to do.

So… I'm looking for suggestions as to training, the goals being recovering my pre-surgical physical condition and being gate ready. My preference is on snow but will hit the gym too.
post #2 of 14

People like you (and me) are their worst enemy sometimes. There's a time to go all out with training and a time to cool your jets. Abdominal surgery is a major trauma to your core, there's no need to rush things in my opinion. That said, I would just work on maintaining range of motion, balance and flexibility. Your prior fitness will be your friend when you can start putting some intensity into it - you will get back to it in no time.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Yes...you're absolutely right. I know I'm crazy for starting training today and heading to the hill tomorrow but I just can't help myself. It looks like I'm at about 80% of the condition I was in pre-surgery so at least I have that going for me.
post #4 of 14

Better to burn out,

than to fade away...

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Yeah...I rushed it a little...did a few runs quickly finding my limit and went in. Damn...
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post

Yeah...I rushed it a little...did a few runs quickly finding my limit and went in. Damn...

That takes guts.

Oh. Wait. That's what they removed.

Seriously, though, make sure you start at the low end of the ramp and get well.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post

Yeah...I rushed it a little...did a few runs quickly finding my limit and went in. Damn...


So the mountain still calls the shots - that's reassuring to know...

 

I would hate it if bulletin board advice had taken the place of Mother Nature.  But hey Lorenzzo, you got out there, you found your limit and you didn't get hurt. That's a pretty good result overall.

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post


So the mountain still calls the shots - that's reassuring to know...

I would hate it if bulletin board advice had taken the place of Mother Nature.  But hey Lorenzzo, you got out there, you found your limit and you didn't get hurt. That's a pretty good result overall.
Yes… except for the trail of blood things turned out just fine.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post

35 days ago I was in what for me was peak physical shape from conditioning beginning in April (end of last ski season). Routines included weights (whole body including 3 x body weight leg presses, heavy core), variety of box jumping, bongo board, cycling, stairclimber with assortment of angle pushes and catches and Doberman chasing and catching.

32 days ago I had unplanned surgery to remove 4" section of congenitally kinked L intest. Recovery smooth, uneventful and faster than expected. Off pain meds 2 days ago. Expecting to get back on skis in 1-2 weeks. Doctor advises additional 1-2 weeks before strenuous activity. I may or may not ignore that based on how I feel, experience with prior above-waist sports surgeries and med advice on those, etc. (doc recommendations overly conservative).

I am 52 years old, no injury history below waist, physically comparable to younger guys and north of 80 days skiing last year. I plan on masters racing through the season. My troop began on snow drills December 1 and I'll have catching up to do.

So… I'm looking for suggestions as to training, the goals being recovering my pre-surgical physical condition and being gate ready. My preference is on snow but will hit the gym too.


Go to physical therapy. Why ask random people on the net when you can go to professionals who can actually see and evaluate your progress?

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 


Go to physical therapy. Why ask random people on the net when you can go to professionals who can actually see and evaluate your progress?

 

 


I have that input but as has been done with other medical questions here I thought I'd throw out a line in case someone had experience somewhat on point and add that to the mix as seemed appropriate.   If I learned anything going through this it's to not blindly trust health care professionals and that the best input comes from those who've gone through something similiar.

post #11 of 14

yes and no
If you are asking questions such as "hey i had this, what happens next? how was it for you?" it's one thing
but asking for a post-op rehab protocol to people who might or might not have any formal training/knowledge in physical therapy/rehab and that do not know anything about your procedure, did not read the op-report, and cannot actually have a first person look at your body is very different.

 

I, for one, do not feel comfortable giving you specific advice, and I've  gone to school for this. Why? because my focus is ortho not internal medicine, and I am not familiar with your current condition. But even if it would have been a knee/shoulder/whatever it would be inconsiderate to give you more than the general, relatively conservative, approach.

JM2C
 

post #12 of 14
Quote:
 Yes… except for the trail of blood things turned out just fine.

Not to worry, a few inches of powder and we won't even notice it!

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

yes and no

If you are asking questions such as "hey i had this, what happens next? how was it for you?" it's one thing

but asking for a post-op rehab protocol to people who might or might not have any formal training/knowledge in physical therapy/rehab and that do not know anything about your procedure, did not read the op-report, and cannot actually have a first person look at your body is very different.

I, for one, do not feel comfortable giving you specific advice, and I've  gone to school for this. Why? because my focus is ortho not internal medicine, and I am not familiar with your current condition. But even if it would have been a knee/shoulder/whatever it would be inconsiderate to give you more than the general, relatively conservative, approach.


JM2C

 
That's prudent and given your background I can certainly understand where you're coming from. I hope and trust that in your practice you give your patients thorough and comprehensive treatment, researching the intricacies of their specific situations as they arise. As a matter of fact when I've had ortho type problems I've gotten that kind of care and my PT's have been excellent. In those situations I didn't feel as much need to do my own research.

As to the health thing we're discussing here, despite my seeing physicians with top reputations I have tended to get a one size fits all approach that resulted in things being missed, misdiagnosed and not optimally treated. I got the distinct feeling I was in a mill ringing cash registers but not getting good care because I was outside the box a little. Who knows if I have been seeing the best doctors in my area but, as I said, they certainly have top reputations amongst other healthcare practitioners.

When I sought out input from those having similar problems by researching the web, then and only then did I get a handle on my situation and how to bring about that which finally resolved my issue. Would I have blindly followed their input? Of course not. But by getting that info it I could challenge my doctors and I can tell you this, they sure as hell needed challenging.

You could say with no disagreement from me I shouldn't had to have done their jobs for them but the fact is I had to turn over my own stones. So that's what I'm doing here. Based on my experiences I simply don't trust my doctors enough to not look over their shoulders. Look, I get the God complex thing I have doctors in my family. But in my book you've gotta earn it and they didn't.

Each avenue I've gone down this way offered a low probability of success but with enough attempts I've found invaluable input.
post #14 of 14

I agree with jzamp on this one. Post-surgery rehab is too important to leave to the randomness of the internet. At the same time, I also recognize that not all the advice you'll get from health care professionals will be great. Unfortunately. Given all that, I'd suggest 3 things:

 

1. Find a health care professional who will give you great advice for you. This might be a doc, a physio, a chiro, even a personal trainer (for the exercise program anyhow - in conjunction with your healthcare pro). It's worth it to take the time to find them, as they'll be a great reference down the road if other things happen (let's face it - we hurl ourselves down mountains - stuff happens). 

2. Listen to your body. If it hurts, it's a sign you've done too much.

3. Err on the side of doing too little. I say this based on what you've posted. I often say that my job as a trainer is to either get my clients to do more or to do less. My guess from above is that you would fit in the 'do less' category. Too much too soon post-surgery can be a big mistake in terms of long term outcome. There may be things you can do, but shouldn't. And in the long run, if you accidentally wait a few extra days or weeks to progress to the next level, you'll still be sitting pretty. The converse is often not true. 

 

Good luck and be smart. You'll be back to yourself before you know it. 

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