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what type ski handles wet, cut-up, heavy glop? - Page 3

post #61 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


True enough. But you are retired, have a season pass, and ski umpteen days a year. Much harder to let it go if you've driven two or three hours and spent a bundle on a day ticket, and you only get out once in a while.

 

Yeah, I felt sorry for the few other people skiing that day, mostly from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Boston.  Travel all that way and spring for lodging, arrive with visions of fresh powder (or anyway, reasonable manmade), only to find the rain soaking everything.  They looked pretty grim, especially on that first lift ride.  Can't imagine that they hated it later, though -- it was good skiing.  Still, by 4 pm, there were only 2 other skiers in the lodge.  

 

Today would have been far worse, I think -- low 20s after a drenching.  Teens tonight.

post #62 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


True enough. But you are retired, have a season pass, and ski umpteen days a year. Much harder to let it go if you've driven two or three hours and spent a bundle on a day ticket, and you only get out once in a while.

 

Yeah, I felt sorry for the few other people skiing that day, mostly from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Boston.  Travel all that way and spring for lodging, arrive with visions of fresh powder (or anyway, reasonable manmade), only to find the rain soaking everything.  They looked pretty grim, especially on that first lift ride.  Can't imagine that they hated it later, though -- it was good skiing.  Still, by 4 pm, there were only 2 other skiers in the lodge.  

 

Today would have been far worse, I think -- low 20s after a drenching.  Teens tonight.


I'll take low 20s after a soaking over rain any day of the week.

post #63 of 72
Quote:

Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

 

 We found that Swix F4 wax also help quite a bit. In fact I just waxed my skis with F4 for Monday.

I've found Zardox NOTwax also works well in wet snow, probably similar in effect to F4.  In fact, regardless of snow conditions, to lengthen the time needed between wax jobs, I reapply it after every ski day.


Edited by chemist - 12/7/14 at 7:59pm
post #64 of 72

I will say I had some good day's when the rain has been light. The snow is soft, the crowds are not there. When you have the water proof gear, might as well use it.

post #65 of 72

I'm going to say @sibhusky won the thread.  While I have some skis that are better than others in this type of mank, if you get by a couple of hard grabs on your skis that's usually a good sign to quit.  If you have to lean back on your tails like a park rat just to make it back to the lift, you are indeed playing with fire (not just in your quads) and it's only a matter of time.  Not worth it.

post #66 of 72

I've decided this is the hole in my Steadfast/Sickle quiver I'm looking to fill this year.   I'm leaning toward an old Mantra.   Here's my thinking based on some skis I've tried in wet, cut-up, heavy conditions (mostly A-basin in late April/May):

 

Steadfast (90mm): pretty good, and what I defaulted to last year.   I wished they were a bit stiffer and wider, though.   Steadfasts are by no means soft, but I notice the lack of metal in these conditions.

 

Sickle: (110mm): I tried these a couple times last year and pretty quickly switched back to my Steadfasts.   They were just too soft and felt like they folded over when slammed into a slush bump I wanted to plow through.   The Sickle is not a super soft wide ski by any means.  It does great in cut up winter crud, and at relatively high speeds on groomers.   There's just not enough there for these conditions.  110mm is also too wide for bumps, and slush bumps are a huge part of the fun on a day like that.

 

Kendo (89mm): even better than the Steadfasts because they are stiffer and have a longer turn radius.   Kendo would be a great choice.   I'm thinking there is only benefit and no penalty going with the Mantra over the Kendo, though.  I prefer the Kendo in bumps, I don't think the Mantra's extra width matters as much in slush bumps.

 

Rossi S3:  Too soft, but still pretty fun if you keep your speed down.  The extra length allowed by the extreme rocker is kinda a wheelie/endo bar to keep you going over back or forward.  A nice benefit of the 186 S3 skiing like a 175.   It's a nice width and easy flex for slush bumps too, again as long as you keep your speed down.

 

(Old) Mantra:  I haven't been on it in maybe threes years now, but my memory is that wet, heavy, cut up glop are its ideal conditions.   Is my memory serving me correctly?

post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


My skis du jour were FX84s.  Extremely light.  Made to be light.  With light bindings.  I'm not that heavy, either.

 

I would not call fx84 light skis... I  don't like light skis but like the FX serie... I find them balanced in term of weight; they are not as heavy as the mx serie but definitly are more than the LX or the TX...

I guess we could call them " light for a ski with 2 sheet of titanal" or " LS2ST" ! :D And yes, it does not have the weight to blast thru...

To have a feeling of a light ski, you could also try the Nordica Steadfast...

post #68 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

...

 

(Old) Mantra:  I haven't been on it in maybe threes years now, but my memory is that wet, heavy, cut up glop are its ideal conditions.   Is my memory serving me correctly?

Worked for  me (see video above) but I sold them anyway and will have to find out in my Bibby Pros work as well in glop.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

 

 We found that Swix F4 wax also help quite a bit. In fact I just waxed my skis with F4 for Monday.

 

We always carry a tube of rub-on flourocarbon wax in the backcountry for when the snow gets dirty and pollen-sticky.

post #69 of 72

I grew up skiing wet heavy PNW snow and I like a directional ski with no rocker.  Speed and commitment are your friends.  My best memories were skiing this stuff on 1st gen Line Profit 100's.  Soft enough to really bend, good and springy to get you out on transitions.  I've seen some great heavy-crud skiing by folks on early version (pre-rocker) Gotama's too.   If you are in decent shape, heavy crud is really fun but lots of work.  I think there are a lot of ways to skin this cat.  I had some Sugar Daddy's that blasted though this stuff but, without the up and down.  A lot of skis will take you for this kind of ride but I don't think that is as much fun as launching into soft piles.

post #70 of 72

Heavy crud?  Pfft... I thought we were talking about sticky, truly wet, glop.  What I think of as heavy crud is a breeze in comparison.  You simply cannot be truly committed through it or you'll get hurt eventually.

post #71 of 72

All this talk about the right wax is garbage....the right structure will get you further.

post #72 of 72

  I have seen days like this and always resort back to my gs skis.  I don't really have any experience with any other (wide ski) in these conditions.  As others mentioned a slalom ski is not going to work and that is the only other ski I have. Either way a gs ski is long enough and the flex is stiff enough that I have been able to get through most crud.  Last year we ended up with a day at 45 degrees maybe even around 50 and it was horrid.  I think most people gave up mid day on skiing.  I found it fairly decent on my Volkl 178 gs ski, not great but decent.

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