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side bevel angles

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

While watching racing on TV, I sometimes hear the comentators mention a racer's ability to glide with the skis flat.  Don't they run a risk of catching an edge when skiing the ski flat?  My other question is: what are the typical side bevel angles used by racers in the down-hill?  One of my pairs of skis came from the factory with 1 deg. base and 3 deg. side; pretty sharp.  I don't dare to ever ski them flat or I'll have a "whooaah-hooaah!" moment!

post #2 of 10
I'm guessing the comment was for a speed event. Not a lot of shape to speed skis. Personally, having grown up with straight skis, I have no issues, even on my current skis, gliding on a flat ski. Then again, I'm not running a .5 base bevel (edit: ski radii varying 16-18). I don't think the racers are doing that in speed events, either. Bill Johnson supposedly won his gold with a 4-5 degree base bevel!!! (Why have any edge at that point???)
Edited by sibhusky - 12/7/14 at 8:30pm
post #3 of 10

Most Speed skis even the older ones have some splay (very subtle rocker) to the tip. Yep.....long before the popularity of rockered skis.

 

Also many detune the outside edge of eahc skis a minimal amount and distance to avoid catching the outside tip.  

 

and yes some WC'ers use 0 degree base bevel at times in SL with as much as a 5 or 6 degree side edge.

 

Gs is genrally .5/3 or 4  SG/DH, 1 and 3

 

Ya gotta to be able to ride a flat ski in speed events!

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I'm guessing the comment was for a speed event. Not a lot of shape to speed skis. Personally, having grown up with straight skis, I have no issues, even on my current skis, gliding on a flat ski. Then again, I'm not running a .5 base bevel. I don't think the racers are doing that in speed events, either. Bill Johnson supposedly won his gold with a 4-5 degree base bevel!!! (Why have any edge at that point???)


I run a 0.5 degree base bevel and have no problems running flat, on anything over about 23 m radius, but most folk prefer a 1 degree or higher for speed skis.  The short radius tend to wobble if run flat, and you need to glide well flat if you don't want to be slow.

post #5 of 10

Currently I'm running 0.5 base and 4 side on both my GS and SL skis, but I come from a straight ski time were 0 base was very common and was running 3 side well before it was popular without detuning (detuning was today's base bevel equivalent) .  If you ski well enough  (balanced front to back and side to side) you can usually get used too and enjoy aggressive set skis.

 

My typical setting for family is 1 and 3, if they need or want more 1 and 4 and finally if needed start dropping the base to 0.5.

 

Besides skier ability and preference, ski design and application will also influence base and side, example: beginner ski will not perform correctly with a 0.5/4 setup, just too much for the ski.  Remember more aggressive set, requires a higher end more aggressive ski.

 

Go with recommendations from Ghost or Atomicman and a couple of others if you let them know what you are skiing and your ability.

post #6 of 10

The commentators aren't referring to the skis' tune, they are referring to the skis being flat on the snow. Some downhill racers are better at turnier courses where their skis are on edge more of the time, and some racers are good gliders--better on courses where their skis are flat on the snow more of the time.

post #7 of 10
I thought the original post was, the racers are gliding well, and that the posting party said how can they just glide without catching an edge. That how I interpreted it. Sounds like you, old goat, think that the posting party was confusing running the ski flat (gliding) with the ski being flat (no bevel)?

You might be right. Certainly points to some confusing terminology.
post #8 of 10

Also horses for courses, a large base bevel can help by keeping more metal off the snow if there is a lot of flat gliding going on, but a lower base bevel can help by a more acute angle if there are a lot of icy turns.

post #9 of 10
My bud is a ski juring guy. He uses A 2 degree n 1/2 base bevel on a pair of gs skis. Snow is usually sloppy for these events. He finished 3 rd in the series I'm pretty sure. It's talent and what ya r used to. Don't wear knee pads like CA did. Rope caught on him on the jump n warren got it on film. My bro warned him of it. These guys r crazy! Horse shoes flying off at them n other stuff I won t mention, but I'm sure ya can imagine.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powderdog View Post

While watching racing on TV, I sometimes hear the comentators mention a racer's ability to glide with the skis flat.  Don't they run a risk of catching an edge when skiing the ski flat?  My other question is: what are the typical side bevel angles used by racers in the down-hill?  One of my pairs of skis came from the factory with 1 deg. base and 3 deg. side; pretty sharp.  I don't dare to ever ski them flat or I'll have a "whooaah-hooaah!" moment!

Aside from all the good tuning info from A-man, Ghost, et al, the folks the commentators are talking about are just flat out better than you, or any of us here for that matter. smile.gif And yes, gliding is a skill. Bill Johnson was a gliding ace.
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