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Waxing Questions - Page 3

post #61 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post


Do you scrape and brush tail to tip?(with exception of roto brush)
I'm not the only one claiming tip to tail ironing.

I iron tip to tail and roto tip to tail in a back and forth motion, except for the last passes of both which go straight tip to tail !   Why Not???  No disadvantage or reduction in effort or convenience reduced by going tip to tail!  There may be no advantage, but there is no disadvantage either!

post #62 of 72

Tip to tail unless you ski switch more often than regular..

post #63 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

You're claiming that it matters which way you run the iron?
One is melting wax onto plastic, which then will be scraped off and brushed, and somehow it makes a difference?
Please explain.

Do you scrape and brush tail to tip?(with exception of roto brush)
I'm not the only one claiming tip to tail ironing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

You're claiming that it matters which way you run the iron?
One is melting wax onto plastic, which then will be scraped off and brushed, and somehow it makes a difference?
Please explain.

Do you scrape and brush tail to tip?(with exception of roto brush)
I'm not the only one claiming tip to tail ironing.
Seth Masia wrote a whole book called "Tip to Tail"
If I recall correctly even edge filling had to be tip to tail. Which is moronic. One has to perform all sorts of gyrations to get that. For no benefit. Maybe i'll find that book over Christmas and burn it. :-)

I see zero benefit to whether one melts wax ironing tip to tail or tail to tip. If you have something let us know. What's the reasoning even? Certainly i've heard it and done it.

The negative is people think theres some sort of magic involved with making metal edges sharp and applying wax to plastic. Statements about which dierction one draws the iron confirm the voodo. Suddenly when we get to skis common practices and sense go out the window and witch doctors take over.
post #64 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Okay Jeff Hamilton set a speed skiing record in 1995, so this is 20 yrs old, but he did do over 150mph on skis.
The sanding from tail to tip is interesting.

 ...instead they were hand-sanded using 150-grit silicon carbide paper. Jeff's dad structured the bases by sanding from tail-to-tip (versus tip-to-tail), postulating that any loose p-tex hairs would lay flat pointed toward the tail of the ski for less friction. He followed this with a scotchbrite pad and brushing.

That's how I do mine and the kid's. IT's actually in the CSCF's tuning manual as well

Of course you should stone grind the skis though to get them flat and reset the edges.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo

Betamix FTW!! hahaha

Ironing tail to tip?? Whatever floats your boat I guess.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

You're claiming that it matters which way you run the iron?
One is melting wax onto plastic, which then will be scraped off and brushed, and somehow it makes a difference?
Please explain.

My boat was always faster when waxed bow to prop but floated better when waxed prop to bow, yes!

beercheer.gif
post #65 of 72
Thread Starter 

Sounds like you guys are all serious racers the way you talk about details of waxing.  I know for certain I don't want to get that much into waxing and doubt that my kids will get that serious into racing that I need to.


After today's ski.  Note the second pair from left are new ones.  I hot waxed them (once). The other ones were just scraped more as mentioned earlier. Probably more what they should look like afterwards.

post #66 of 72
Hey! Beautiful job, cc.
post #67 of 72

Nice.    2nd pair from right isn't quite up to the standard of the others, but it's better than it was, by a lot. 

post #68 of 72

I know people who file tip to tail on one side and tail to tip on the other.  Doesn't seem to affect the performance of their skis.

post #69 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post



Seth Masia wrote a whole book called "Tip to Tail"
If I recall correctly even edge filling had to be tip to tail. Which is moronic. One has to perform all sorts of gyrations to get that. For no benefit. Maybe i'll find that book over Christmas and burn it. :-)

I see zero benefit to whether one melts wax ironing tip to tail or tail to tip. If you have something let us know. What's the reasoning even? Certainly i've heard it and done it.

The negative is people think theres some sort of magic involved with making metal edges sharp and applying wax to plastic. Statements about which dierction one draws the iron confirm the voodo. Suddenly when we get to skis common practices and sense go out the window and witch doctors take over.

There's plenty of voodoo in w/c tech rooms and premiere shops, you just have to believe.

post #70 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by CornCarver View Post
 

Sounds like you guys are all serious racers the way you talk about details of waxing.  I know for certain I don't want to get that much into waxing and doubt that my kids will get that serious into racing that I need to.


 

 

Skis look great, way better than before.  Did you feel a difference?

post #71 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


If I recall correctly even edge filling had to be tip to tail. Which is moronic. One has to perform all sorts of gyrations to get that. For no benefit.

 

 

  Not so fast with the value judgment.    :)    You're recalling the procedure but not the context.     That advice was for segmented edges or cracked edges.

 

If you had cracked or segmented steel edges, filing tail-to-tip made for burrs and uneven transitions on the leading edge of each segment.    For additional fun and games, on segmented edges filing tail to tip combined with a hard push of the file would destroy the rear bevel on the tipward segment.       
 

So yes, I filed my Elans and my K2 CSLs tip to tail.    Gyrations?   I don't remember gyrations.     I do also remember the faster rusting, on the Elans especially, if I forgot.

 

post #72 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

  Not so fast with the value judgment.    :)    You're recalling the procedure but not the context.     That advice was for segmented edges or cracked edges.

 

If you had cracked or segmented steel edges, filing tail-to-tip made for burrs and uneven transitions on the leading edge of each segment.    For additional fun and games, on segmented edges filing tail to tip combined with a hard push of the file would destroy the rear bevel on the tipward segment.       
 

So yes, I filed my Elans and my K2 CSLs tip to tail.    Gyrations?   I don't remember gyrations.     I do also remember the faster rusting, on the Elans especially, if I forgot.

 

Aha! touche.

I'll take that reasoning. Perhaps I'll hold off on the book burning.

Though I don't think there's been many segmented edges since the Vokl's of the late 90's.

You're going to have to switch hands to maintain tip to tail. Most people are far better off staying with their dominant hand. Especially as with non-segmented edges, 99.97% of all skis these days, it makes zero difference to the metal edge. Slipping over the edge and filing the edge at some ghastly angle is far more damage than any pseudo benefit from tip to tail filing of a continuous edge.

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