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Instructors: your biggest "ooops" moment?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Instructors...  anyone have any good stories they would like to share regarding things you said that came out badly, things you did that didn't turn out the way that was intended, things you asked your students to do that produced a "oh wait...  don't" reaction?

 

I don't recall seeing a thread along these lines...  thought it would be humorous to share some of our faux pas.  :cool

post #2 of 23

For some reason, the first thing that comes to mind for me wasn't something I did, but it was an incident that, if I recall correctly, you witnessed, Kevin. 

 

It was an EpicSki Academy, and several groups had hiked to the top of Highland Bowl at Aspen Highlands (an "epic" experience if there ever was one!). A bunch of fresh but heavy powder awaited as we headed toward "Full Curl," right down the middle of the Bowl. Coach Megan had already sent some of her group down, and they waited at the bottom. Our own skier extraordinaire, CGeib, started down to "demonstrate" but, just above the top of the steep headwall, lost a ski and tumbled head over heels into the powder. He looked up and cleared the snow from his goggles just in time to see his ski disappear over the edge and accelerate down the Bowl. Megan tried to alert her group below to the runaway ski racing toward them. "SKI! SKI!" she hollered. 

 

Obeying her orders, . . . they all skied off. 

 

Oops!

 

(Yes, I got it on video. And CGeib made it down Highland Bowl in heavy crud on one ski, but I think he found a screwdriver shortly after that to prevent it from happening again!)

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

For some reason, the first thing that comes to mind for me wasn't something I did, but it was an incident that, if I recall correctly, you witnessed, Kevin.

 

Well, I sort-of witnessed it.  I was looking over the bowl with my usual :eek expression and I saw Chris' ski go rocketing down the bowl followed by the "SKI!  SKI!" references.  I turned to look at what had transpired to lead to the runaway ski and that's when I saw Chris cleaning snow off his goggles.

 

I don't think I'm visible in the video the incident... I must be just off the frame.

post #4 of 23

Early December 1979, Breckenridge, Colorado--

 

It was the first real lesson that I taught, my rookie season at Breckenridge. I had made it through the 5-day hiring clinic and landed the job at the Ski School. I had gone through the mandatory job training. I had my uniform. And my name tag. I was a Professional Ski Instructor!

 

The day before, I had "shadowed" a first-timer lesson led by master instructor "Dirk," one of Breckenridge's very few Full-Certified instructors at the time (and a brilliant instructor to this day). Dirk had, as usual, conducted a masterful lesson for "our" group of eager and strong beginners. At Breckenridge in those days, a first time lesson spent the morning on the "A-Hill" at the bottom, learning and practicing fundamentals, and then after lunch took not one but two chairlifts to the top of "Silverthorne." Silverthorne is one of the best first-time-on-the-mountain "green" trails anywhere--wide, gentle, and perfect for those first shaky turns. Except for the first pitch, which was quite steep for a green run, and which we had been repeatedly told in training never to take first-timers down, but instead to take a round-about route down "Lower Lehman" to bypass the first pitch of Silverthorne.

 

Dirk, who again had taught his charges brilliantly, and who had me to help (for whatever that was worth), and who had accurately assessed his group's strength, decided to take the class down the upper pitch of Silverthorne. And it went perfectly, as his well-prepared students glided down without a struggle or a hitch. 

 

So the next day, it was my turn--my debut class. I, Professional Ski Instructor, did my best to replicate Dirk's great teaching progression. But my "best" was only the work of a first-day instructor--a fact whose profound significance did not, at the time, occur to me. After lunch, we made it up and off the two chairlifts (somehow). And then, ... I'll bet you can guess what happened next.

 

One after another, I watched in horror as my group crashed and burned and tumbled and lost skis, some sliding all the way down, some in the weeds and bushes and trees on the side of (the forbidden) Upper Silverthorne. I slowly picked up the scattered carcasses and shattered egos of my unfortunate group, got all their skis back on (Spademan bindings--no easy task), and finally gathered them together--fortunately injury-free--at the bottom of the pitch. 

 

Then, my supervisor slid out from the trees at the trail's edge, where he had observed the whole thing. "When you get down, please come and speak with me," he said, looking me sternly in the eye and not at all smiling. 

 

Somehow or other, I lived to teach another day. I don't believe I skied Upper Silverthorne again for at least a year--and I certainly never took another first-time class down it.

 

Oops! 

 

(But I did learn the valuable lesson that the biggest reason we have students is to help us, as instructors, to learn!)

 

:D

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

Early December 1979, Breckenridge, Colorado--

 

It was the first real lesson that I taught, my rookie season at Breckenridge. I had made it through the 5-day hiring clinic and landed the job at the Ski School. I had gone through the mandatory job training. I had my uniform. And my name tag. I was a Professional Ski Instructor!

 

 

Dirk is my go-to instructor at Breck lesson club. I asked him about this incident. He not only corroborated, but said that when interrogated, you refused to name the instructor you'd shadowed - thus making him a big fan of yours from that day on.

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

Early December 1979, Breckenridge, Colorado--

 

 At Breckenridge in those days, a first time lesson spent the morning on the "A-Hill" at the bottom, learning and practicing fundamentals, and then after lunch took not one but two chairlifts to the top of "Silverthorne." Silverthorne is one of the best first-time-on-the-mountain "green" trails anywhere--wide, gentle, and perfect for those first shaky turns.

 

I'm going to try to give the readers a PICTURE of what this place looked like.  Bob, It wasn't your fault !!!   Dirk, Bob and I were all there at the same time and stationed at the same area of the mountain.  

 

The key words are underlined in the quote from Bob.  The supervisors did NOT want anyone teaching turns in the first 2 hours at the bottom.  I think starting in 1980 or so when the 4 pack replaced the original A lift it looked like this....

 

1)     The classes got on the lift (10 minute ride or so on a high speed 4-pack) and the lift's exit ramp was inside a building. HINT-  Always remind the students to wait for the lift to .....swing twice as it slows down or you will get off too soon.  You really learned to hope that it was the person on either the right or left that made the mistake of getting off early as they only crashed into the wooden side wall to the right or concrete wall to the left instead of taking out all on the chair that may have had a resasonable chance of survival....unless of course they failed in the wrong direction taking out the other three.  Damn !

 

2) Now, turn right outside of the building and begin the football field length of terrain to the (da-daaahh)  BAVARIAN TURN.  A 160 degree switchback.  (UH....keep in mind that the supervisors wanted NO TURNS taught at the bottom).  Oh BOY.  Now keep in mind the students usually followed one another.....like this   >>>>>>  >>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> >> >>>>>>>>.   (you can picture for yourself what happened when the guy in the back had a waxed pair of skis.  Yep.....we just invented the skiing accordian.

 

3) OK so somehow we got them around the turn, usually with the help of an instructor stationed there who pushed, pulled and twisted them in the right direction to head further down the cat tract.

 

4)  Next....a pitch.....Oh BOY.....the steepest they'd seen so far in their skiing career.  Quietly many of the instructors there referred to this area as "The Bowling Alley".  It came complete with human " pin setters".  Their job.........To RUN then GRAB then LIFT and PUSH toward the big tree with the Orange ribbons on it  two and a half football fields away.  Then yell in a comforting voice "You'll find your class there somewhere"  (Yes....those instructors did get paid to do that)

 

On record days there were 2200 or so in the parade.

 

Those were some really fun times, weren't they BOB !

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

Early December 1979, Breckenridge, Colorado--

 

 At Breckenridge in those days, a first time lesson spent the morning on the "A-Hill" at the bottom, learning and practicing fundamentals, and then after lunch took not one but two chairlifts to the top of "Silverthorne." Silverthorne is one of the best first-time-on-the-mountain "green" trails anywhere--wide, gentle, and perfect for those first shaky turns.

 

I'm going to try to give the readers a PICTURE of what this place looked like.  Bob, It wasn't your fault !!!   Dirk, Bob and I were all there at the same time and stationed at the same area of the mountain.  

 

The key words are underlined in the quote from Bob.  The supervisors did NOT want anyone teaching turns in the first 2 hours at the bottom.  I think starting in 1980 or so when the 4 pack replaced the original A lift it looked like this....

 

1)     The classes got on the lift (10 minute ride or so on a high speed 4-pack) and the lift's exit ramp was inside a building. HINT-  Always remind the students to wait for the lift to .....swing twice as it slows down or you will get off too soon.  You really learned to hope that it was the person on either the right or left that made the mistake of getting off early as they only crashed into the wooden side wall to the right or concrete wall to the left instead of taking out all on the chair that may have had a resasonable chance of survival....unless of course they failed in the wrong direction taking out the other three.  Damn !

 

2) Now, turn right outside of the building and begin the football field length of terrain to the (da-daaahh)  BAVARIAN TURN.  A 160 degree switchback.  (UH....keep in mind that the supervisors wanted NO TURNS taught at the bottom).  Oh BOY.  Now keep in mind the students usually followed one another.....like this   >>>>>>  >>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> >> >>>>>>>>.   (you can picture for yourself what happened when the guy in the back had a waxed pair of skis.  Yep.....we just invented the skiing accordian.

 

3) OK so somehow we got them around the turn, usually with the help of an instructor stationed there who pushed, pulled and twisted them in the right direction to head further down the cat tract.

 

4)  Next....a pitch.....Oh BOY.....the steepest they'd seen so far in their skiing career.  Quietly many of the instructors there referred to this area as "The Bowling Alley".  It came complete with human " pin setters".  Their job.........To RUN then GRAB then LIFT and PUSH toward the big tree with the Orange ribbons on it  two and a half football fields away.  Then yell in a comforting voice "You'll find your class there somewhere"  (Yes....those instructors did get paid to do that)

 

On record days there were 2200 or so in the parade.

 

Those were some really fun times, weren't they BOB !

I'm having trouble picturing this =/ Do you have actual photographs or a crayon drawing?

post #8 of 23

Uncle Louie--thanks for the reminder! Yes, those were certainly "the days." He was not exaggerating even one bit, BounceSwoosh.

 

Here's more:

 

Our "A-Hill" in those days was a small, rectangular patch of snow, maybe 200 feet wide, with a decent pitch that ended abruptly at a low concrete wall in front of the medical clinic. On that hill, every morning, the supervisors would line up our new first-timers--often literally hundreds of them, in vertical lines of between 20 and 40 (sometimes more) students. Each line would be one class, and there would be another class lined up tail-to-tail behind them. There would be a little space, often as little as two ski lengths wide, between the groups, and that was all the space each group would have to work with.

 

Instructors were then assigned to each class, and we had the morning to get our troops prepared and sufficiently skilled and practiced that they'd have a fighting chance of surviving the afternoon ordeal up the chairlift and through the "Bowling Alley" that Uncle Louie described above (which was, nevertheless, an improvement over the old "A1" and "A2" chairs that took us to Upper Silverthorne and Lower Lehman, that I described in my previous post). So you'd have two hours and a ten-foot-wide lane with which to create 20 to 40 skiers capable of surviving (and, possibly, enjoying) the challenges of the mountain and the long (sometimes very long) ski all the way to the bottom in the afternoon. To make matters worse, when we were really busy, they'd stack another set of groups above the first groups on the hill. One runaway student could "domino" as many as 100 people below him!

 

And that little wall at the bottom had a small opening right in the middle of it, through which the Patrol would bring the sleds with injured skiers from the mountain to the First Aid Room. Nothing breeds confidence in a new skiing student like having to move aside for a parade of toboggans carrying what appear to be body bags full of their fellow "skiers" into a medical facility. 

 

Nothing, that is, except perhaps a helicopter. Yes, when needed, the "A-Hill" was also the landing pad for the Flight For Life helicopter. It didn't come by very often, fortunately, but when it did, we all had to clear to the side of the hill and let the helicopter in for a landing. And we had to wait while they brought out the gurney with the injured patient, and all of the IV lines and breathing tubes and whatever else accompanied him or her. 

 

In spite of all these challenges, it was amazing how successful we usually were. Instructors learned how to work in a confined space, and we learned what was important, and what was a waste of time. Failure was not an option. After lunch, we had to go up the mountain, because the A-Hill would be full of the afternoon half-day beginners. Any instructor whose students were not prepared to ride and unload the chairlift and survive the challenging terrain at the top and the narrow, switchbacked road that bypassed another steep section at the bottom--and everything in between--was in for a very long and arduous day (as, of course, were his students). We lost a few students from the sport to frustration and fatigue on that first day, I have no doubt. And I do recall, at least once, pausing at the top of the last pitch to enjoy the full moon rising as the sun set behind us....

 

But the vast majority got a start to skiing that they would surely never forget. And really, by the time they got to the bottom, most of them were turning and gliding and well on their way with a good, solid foundation, smiling and justifiably proud of their accomplishment. We'd see many of them again the next day, at the "B-split." In fact, our percentage of returning students was surely higher then, by far, than the current national average. A good instructor would often keep the same class for four or five days (albeit losing a few along the way, and adding a few from the "split" each  day). For newer instructors, keeping your class together for several days was the only way to ever get up to the "mountain split" (for levels "C" through "F"--in the old system that has long ago been replaced by our current "1-9" classification system). The longer you could keep your class going, the longer you could delay hearing again those fateful words from your supervisor, "Barnes--to zee A's." 

 

But all that was a walk in the park, compared to the year we had so little snow that the "A-Hill" was unskiable. So we had to teach our beginning classes a not-so-short walk up the hill, in the fenced in yard with trees and roots and rocks, where they kept the horses for the sleigh rides....

 

Those were, indeed, the days!

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

Uncle Louie--thanks for the reminder! Yes, those were certainly "the days." He was not exaggerating even one bit, BounceSwoosh.

 

Here's more:

 

Our "A-Hill" in those days was a small, rectangular patch of snow, maybe 200 feet wide, with a decent pitch that ended abruptly at a low concrete wall in front of the medical clinic. On that hill, every morning, the supervisors would line up our new first-timers--often literally hundreds of them, in vertical lines of between 20 and 40 (sometimes more) students. Each line would be one class, and there would be another class lined up tail-to-tail behind them. There would be a little space, often as little as two ski lengths wide, between the groups, and that was all the space each group would have to work with.

 

I'm beginning to understand your fondness for pivot slips...  :cool

 

:duck:

post #10 of 23
Bounces: Ski Cashier to the "no jumping" ridge and notice the building at your skier's right. That was the top of the lift described. Picture coming out of the building and following the cat track that goes down toward the top of the Quicksilver chair.
post #11 of 23
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Our "A-Hill" in those days was a small, rectangular patch of snow, maybe 200 feet wide, with a decent pitch that ended abruptly at a low concrete wall in front of the medical clinic. On that hill, every morning, the supervisors would line up our new first-timers--often literally hundreds of them, in vertical lines of between 20 and 40 (sometimes more) students. Each line would be one class, and there would be another class lined up tail-to-tail behind them. There would be a little space, often as little as two ski lengths wide, between the groups, and that was all the space each group would have to work with.

 

That is nuts. What is a never-ever class like these days? Are there just not nearly as many people on any given day trying skiing for the first time? Do more people just skip the lesson part their first day?

post #12 of 23

After line ups and getting cut free to go ski my buddy and I ventured out the back side of the ski hill with a couple others that weren't picked to partake in something that turned out to be more potent than I thought it was.  I got paged 10 minutes later for a private lesson.  I didn't feel like I had a clue what I was doing, I was still pretty new, but apparently it went OK.  That turned out to be my secret private with the ski school director's buddy to assess my competence.  No bad feedback so whew!  Made sure to not do that stuff while in a jacket for awhile after that...

post #13 of 23

We have a small beginner slope, one notch up from the never-ever magic carpet slope.

 

It has a 2 seat chairlift.  I was with a 6 year old at the time.  The unloading from this chair is a mound that comes up below the chair and than down again to unload.  Probably the hardest chair to get off of (for a beginner because it's steep, for the Instructor because it's low and tight and you really have to get out of the way of the student carefully to unload.)

 

I keep my pole across the student's stomach as a second safety bar as I raise the bar.  This kid managed to slip off the chair as we were coming to the end as the mound was coming up under us.  He fell straight down onto it, about 6-8 feet  Wasn't hurt fortunately.

 

Later on in the lesson the same kid got off the chair, made a complete u-turn and went down next to the chair impaling himself on a broken metal ski pole that was lying there.  Well impale is a strong word, but he did get cut.  He was fine with it.  Asked me "is it bweeding?"  He kept asking that for the rest of the lesson "Is it still bweeding?"   Really just a deep scratch.

 

Told the parent all about it and to my surprise the father was fine with it.  Tough kid he said, he can take it.  Phew.  I think this was my first year teaching.

 

Haven't lost a kid off a chairlift since!

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

That is nuts. 

Well it was ....and wasn't.  I can't imagine a better group of instructors at any hill that could do what the Breckenridge staff did in those days.  The odds were so against us we just had to excell....and we did.

 

Confirm it with Dirk next time you ski with him....and give him a big Hello....he'll know me as my handle here....Uncle Louie.

post #15 of 23

The last post reminded me of a child I had one day in class.  We left the magic carpet and headed to the easy chairlift.  I instructed my charge in how to load and unload the chairlift.  Each time we approached the top I would have the youngster  prepare to unload and then when to standup.  Lift the bar, sit up straight etc.    After about 5-6 trips up the lift I figured he knew when to exit the chair...I was wrong.   Without my prompting, he sat there as I got out of the chair.   Unfortunately, the chair lift was new that season and the wand designed to trip the stop switch  was set too low for  the kid to trip with his feet so he headed back down the mountain without me and with the safety bar up.  Fortunately, the attendant noticed the problem before the kid got too far and we were able to retrieve him without much fanfare.   I guess it's Murphy's law at work.   YM

post #16 of 23

Well guess it's my turn since I'm here.

 

Mt. Snow VT sometime around 1975.  

 

We had a Nastar Race for our ski weekers every Thursday.  On Wednesdays I'd usually give my folks a few pointers and have them run a few gates.  That was lots of fun.  One week I had a pretty strong group and I decided they were up for a real lesson on what to do in the starting gate.

 

I gave them the gereral idea verbally, then got into the gate and kicked my heals high in the air......and double ejected.  I'm told it looked sort of like a Swan Dive.  The safety straps didn't help and it did take a minute or 3 to catch my breath after impact.  I turned and looked and my class looked like they had seen a ghost.

 

Fast foward to our Thursday night party with all the instructors and students (typically 400 hundred or so).  We had a show on our indoor ski deck which I was involved in.  At an intermission the movie screen started to drop and my friend (our engineering guy) motioned me over indicating we had a malfunction.  When I got next to him I learned our Video Guy was in the gondola right above the starting gate.  And he got it all on film.  Close ups too. :o 

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
 

Well guess it's my turn since I'm here.

 

Mt. Snow VT sometime around 1975.  

 

We had a Nastar Race for our ski weekers every Thursday.  On Wednesdays I'd usually give my folks a few pointers and have them run a few gates.  That was lots of fun.  One week I had a pretty strong group and I decided they were up for a real lesson on what to do in the starting gate.

 

I gave them the gereral idea verbally, then got into the gate and kicked my heals high in the air......and double ejected.  I'm told it looked sort of like a Swan Dive.  The safety straps didn't help and it did take a minute or 3 to catch my breath after impact.  I turned and looked and my class looked like they had seen a ghost.

 

Fast foward to our Thursday night party with all the instructors and students (typically 400 hundred or so).  We had a show on our indoor ski deck which I was involved in.  At an intermission the movie screen started to drop and my friend (our engineering guy) motioned me over indicating we had a malfunction.  When I got next to him I learned our Video Guy was in the gondola right above the starting gate.  And he got it all on film.  Close ups too. :o 

 

Who do we need to contact to get this film uploaded to YouTube?  :D

post #18 of 23

My most recent "learning experience" Was being introduced to a 4 y.o. Parents says he skis well, He's moving good on the flat, I lead him down a shallow hill and everything checks out. I ski backwards leading him down to the chair making sure to note his cloths. Blue helmet, Yellow jacket. Up to the top. Lead him (still skiing backwards) down to an easy flat slope. I get him lined up on the easy way down. I tell him I'm tired of going first and would he lead. As I spin out to the side to let him pass someone stops me to ask directions. I answer, look up, no kid. Losing a kid in a private lesson is really not acceptable. I look down the trail I told him to go and there's a kid in a white helmet and red jacket but not my kid. I look down the harder trail he could have gone to I see no kids and it's too long for him to be out of sight already so I head down the intended trail. As I pass the kid in white/red I realize the helmet is blue on the front and fades/flames to white on the back and the jacket is yellow on the front and red on the back. Moral to the story, I now make sure to give everyone a 360 check out before they leave my sight.

 

Not while teaching but the 2nd year I was teaching The Central ed staff was having their early season ski session. As my area had a lot of examiners on staff l was watching both what they were doing, and who was in the group I might know. I was still looking over my shoulder approaching the lift line...I skied into, and flipped over, a thigh high rope, in uniform, 20' in front of a dozen examiners, one of whom was my SSD.

Fortunately he was used to me.

He only gave me an eyeroll. 

Once everyone finished laughing.

post #19 of 23

I don't know if this is my biggest "oops" moment, as I have had many. But this is definitely in the running.

 

Back in 2004, I was teaching full time at Okemo, in their 4-7 year old program. As a veteran full timer, I was typically given upper level classes. Those classes mostly consisted of staff kids and seasonal kids. I was leading them down a blue trail, and we had gotten about 6" of fresh snow that day. Being the thorough instructor I am, I frequently "checked six" to make sure I had all of my kids. I usually did that by turning around, skiing switch, and counting my kids quickly. Then I would turn around and continue to ski. On this occasion, I turned and skied switch while I checked on my kids. I knew I had to do it quickly, as I was coming up to a trail junction, which I didn't want to enter while still switch. So I counted quickly, and went to casually turn myself back around to go straight again. That's when trouble struck. As I spun my skis around, they caught in the soft snow, and stopped dead. Of course, Isaac Newton being the uncompromising fellow he is, the rest of my body didn't stop, but continued on downhill. I hit the snow butt first, hard, and then my shoulders, and finally my head snapped back and smashed off the snow (I did manage to find a firm patch of snow with my head). Luckily, I was wearing my helmet, so my brains managed to stay in my head. But the stars came out very early that day for me, and when I slid to a stop, my face was wet and tasted salty. Of course, I was bleeding rather copiously out of both my nostrils. And by the time I had enough capacity to lift my head up, my entire class was around me, and there were a number of bystanders around, all very concerned about my well being. I got myself up, shoved some snow up my nose, and took a minute to regroup. 

 

I was able to finish out the day, and I think my concussion was fairly minor. Never got it checked out. What was much worse was that the kids of course told their parents, and I had people mentioning the incident for the rest of the season. It became fairly humorous to all in the end. 

post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

I don't know if this is my biggest "oops" moment, as I have had many. But this is definitely in the running.

 

Back in 2004, I was teaching full time at Okemo, in their 4-7 year old program. As a veteran full timer, I was typically given upper level classes. Those classes mostly consisted of staff kids and seasonal kids. I was leading them down a blue trail, and we had gotten about 6" of fresh snow that day. Being the thorough instructor I am, I frequently "checked six" to make sure I had all of my kids. I usually did that by turning around, skiing switch, and counting my kids quickly. Then I would turn around and continue to ski. On this occasion, I turned and skied switch while I checked on my kids. I knew I had to do it quickly, as I was coming up to a trail junction, which I didn't want to enter while still switch. So I counted quickly, and went to casually turn myself back around to go straight again. That's when trouble struck. As I spun my skis around, they caught in the soft snow, and stopped dead. Of course, Isaac Newton being the uncompromising fellow he is, the rest of my body didn't stop, but continued on downhill. I hit the snow butt first, hard, and then my shoulders, and finally my head snapped back and smashed off the snow (I did manage to find a firm patch of snow with my head). Luckily, I was wearing my helmet, so my brains managed to stay in my head. But the stars came out very early that day for me, and when I slid to a stop, my face was wet and tasted salty. Of course, I was bleeding rather copiously out of both my nostrils. And by the time I had enough capacity to lift my head up, my entire class was around me, and there were a number of bystanders around, all very concerned about my well being. I got myself up, shoved some snow up my nose, and took a minute to regroup. 

 

I was able to finish out the day, and I think my concussion was fairly minor. Never got it checked out. What was much worse was that the kids of course told their parents, and I had people mentioning the incident for the rest of the season. It became fairly humorous to all in the end. 

 

I think you win the Bad Ass Award of the Day.  Thumbs Up

post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 

I guess it's time for me to share my story...  I spent two winters teaching at Ski Liberty (or was it Roundtop?) in Pennsylvania.  Little bump hills that attracted the masses from the Washington DC area.  I would usually work the afternoon and evening shifts, so I would just free ski in the morning.

 

One time I was out free-skiing and I crashed hard and gave myself a case of skiers thumb.  I didn't know what it was called back then, but I did know I had no grip anymore.  So I skied back down to the base (not all that far!), went inside, found an ice pack and plopped down in the ski school waiting room / lobby area with my ice pack.  In uniform.  In full view of whatever members of the public happened to come through.

 

My SSD came over and gently mentioned that there are better places to recuperate from an injury. :o  To her credit, she did ask if I was ok to work that afternoon, and I did, although I remember not helping any of my fallen students get up that particular afternoon.  I never did get my hand checked-out...  started feeling better in a few days.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post


Confirm it with Dirk next time you ski with him....and give him a big Hello....he'll know me as my handle here....Uncle Louie.

I told Dirk about this thread today.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post


Confirm it with Dirk next time you ski with him....and give him a big Hello....he'll know me as my handle here....Uncle Louie.

I told Dirk about this thread today.

 

Sigh. Stuck at home this weekend. Wish I were skiing up there. I mentioned it to him before. He does not seem to be overly interested in internet fora, that I can tell.

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