or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Finally getting skis for fiance
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Finally getting skis for fiance

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

My fiance and I love skiing, but she has not had much of an opportunity to ski in the last 4 years due to med school.  She's looking to get back into it this year (finally!), and I'd like your thoughts on gear for her.  Below is some background information:

 

Background:

My fiance is 5'4" and ~135lbs.  

 

Experience:

My fiance has been skiing since she was a child.  However, she's always used hand-me-down gear and has never been properly geared up, nor has she received extensive formal education. Nearly all of her experience has been with poor-fitting boots and straight, old-school skis.  That said, she is confident on the slopes and can get down nearly any frontside slope. 

 

This winter, we are both enrolled in a month-long "development" course at our local mountain, which is basically an extended small group lesson.  We meet with an instructor every weekend for 4 weekends. 

 

In the future, we'll probably stick to on-piste skiing mostly. We are planning to move next year, but we don't know where this will be yet.  There is a good chance, we'll be in the west with close access to bigger mountains (Whistler, Tahoe, etc.).  Right now, we're stuck on the east coast mini-mountains.

 

 

Gear:

Boots - We went to a fitter and got everything set up a few weeks ago for this.  

Skis - Initially, we were thinking of renting performance skis for this season as she "learns" the technique for shaped skis.  This will also allow her to try out a few different brands/shapes and see what she likes.  But, I'm finding some good deals online, and I'm wondering if it makes sense to just go ahead and buy skis now.  In particular, I found a good deal on a 160cm 2012 Rossi Experience 83. Should we just spring for this now?

 

If we start doing a lot of off-piste skiing, we'll prob start thinking about adding a second, wider ski into the quiver.

 

Thanks for your help!

post #2 of 16
Nice to hear you have the boots taken care of. I also think your on the right track about renting for the season or weekends if you can change ski brands.



IMO 160cm is to long for her.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

I guess it makes sense to rent for the year and learn what she likes.  I was just thinking I could save a couple hundred $ by buying outright.

post #4 of 16
In the early stages, it's better to rent, then start eventually trying demos. Especially on mountain demos, using the same trail the same day, can help you identify how each ski behaves differently and help you decide what characteristics you want to look for.
post #5 of 16

A great question for Trekchick. She's the resident expert on this but as she knows I'm a HUGE fan of women on Blizzard Black Pearls. I know a lot of women of different skill levels from intermediate to instructors who swear by that ski including my GF (light intermediate). She won't go back to her other set anymore unless there are rocks showing through the snow. Start there w/ a demo and see what she thinks as they are one of the "Standards" and most popular of the modern women's ski. They have a huge following of many who swear by them. Enjoy!

post #6 of 16

Paging @Trekchick for suggestions.  Would help to know what region you are skiing in.

post #7 of 16
Better demo and have her pick them out...I put my wife on demo skis I thought shed like and she didn't. I won't buy a ski for her with her having tried them.
post #8 of 16
Please let her demo. Five of my girlfriends and I went to Loveland demo day. We are all decent skiers with varying styles and ability level. It was interesting to see that some of us loved skis that others hated. Lots of great skis. The ski for your fiancé is the one that she loves.
post #9 of 16
Contrarian here ... I say "buy"

She's just getting back into skiing. She's just getting into modern equipment. Her needs may change if you move next year. East coast, especially mini-mountains, may not have a robust selection of demo and rental gear - and it may not be well-maintained.

I was on the east coast, DC area. Bought my first 3 pairs of skis without demo. I tried demo-chasing. Ha. They really were not as available as some made it sound.

On SkiDiva forum, I see 2010 Dynastar Idyll, 156 cm, $200, skied only a few days, (listed in January, no "sold" post). I demo'd this when it came out and really liked it.

Also on SkiDiva forum, 2011 Dynastar Exclusive Active, 153, $200 OBO.

Levelninesports has 2012 Head Maya #3, 156, $209

All of those could be skied for a season and sold at a swap next year at no loss.

Levelninesports also has the new line that Trekchick seems to like - Head Joy. Pure Joy @ $449, Absolute Joy @ $549. Not the cheapest, but TC knows her gear so one of the Joy lineup could be a real keeper.

So much depends on whether she thinks she should demo or just wants a reasonable ski for starters, knowing she may get only one season out of them before she's ready to move on.
post #10 of 16

You're on the right track with this thread and have gotten some good advice. 

 

Demo'ing is always good if she has an idea what she's looking for.  Sometimes the dude running the demo or rental center isn't knowledgable about the women's skis and can steer her in the wrong direction.  

That being said, If you rent, please make it a high performance rental or demo.  See if she can do a multi day/multi ski demo and have that apply toward the purchase of a ski. 

 

Buying can be good as well but if you buy used you may run the risk of having her get on equipment that is beaten up, or with a bad tune. 

 

That being said...There are some amazing ski options for her especially this season with some of the new offerings for women. 

 

With the description you gave, 

Quote:
 

Background:

My fiance is 5'4" and ~135lbs.  

 

Experience:

My fiance has been skiing since she was a child.  However, she's always used hand-me-down gear and has never been properly geared up, nor has she received extensive formal education. Nearly all of her experience has been with poor-fitting boots and straight, old-school skis.  That said, she is confident on the slopes and can get down nearly any frontside slope. 

 

This winter, we are both enrolled in a month-long "development" course at our local mountain, which is basically an extended small group lesson.  We meet with an instructor every weekend for 4 weekends. 

 

In the future, we'll probably stick to on-piste skiing mostly. We are planning to move next year, but we don't know where this will be yet.  There is a good chance, we'll be in the west with close access to bigger mountains (Whistler, Tahoe, etc.).  Right now, we're stuck on the east coast mini-mountains

I would stick with something that has a strong on piste bias and add something to compliment it later when you two are venturing more off piste.  

I'll do some tagging on the page so you can easily look at some of these options. 

Skis for a demo list: 

Head Super Joy

Blizzard Cheyenne

Nordica Cinnamon Girl

Volkl Yumi

K2 Potion 84

 

^^^ This is a start.  I'm sure I'll think of something more.

post #11 of 16

I think she should take ownership over her own gear choice.

post #12 of 16

We all have a starter pair of all mountain skiis ,,

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I think she should take ownership over her own gear choice.


While I agree with you in the sense of women knowing what they want, I think its a bit arrogant for us to assume that all women want to take ownership of their ski gear.  

 

With the kind of job I have and the amount of women I see both in the ski shop and at women's ski clinics, there are tons of women who are happy to have their mate sort out their skis.  Usually that changes in time and after spending some quality time with me. :D

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I think she should take ownership over her own gear choice.


While I agree with you in the sense of women knowing what they want, I think its a bit arrogant for us to assume that all women want to take ownership of their ski gear.  

 

With the kind of job I have and the amount of women I see both in the ski shop and at women's ski clinics, there are tons of women who are happy to have their mate sort out their skis.  Usually that changes in time and after spending some quality time with me. :D

 

I'm okay with being called arrogant ;-)

post #15 of 16

Ladies in the Hizzouse! :)

post #16 of 16
East coast demoing ... I have heard that Mount Snow has a great demo selection on mountain. No personal experience with it. I suggest calling ahead - there or elsewhere - to determine what the selection really is.

Michigan - Nub's Nob has a demo program and publishes their demo fleet. I haven't been there but have bought skis from them (IIRC, demo fleet is 1/2 price toward end of season).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Finally getting skis for fiance