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"Grooming" a World Cup slalom course

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Nice pic I got from a friend.

The pic shows some prep work for the slalom course at Val Gardena.

Notice that they are "grooming" with fire hoses.

If you have never skied on an injected course you have missed an interesting skiing experience.

post #2 of 9

Did you mean Val d'Isere? Val Gardena doesn't host a WC Slalom this year.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Not sure where.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Plus...a new ski racing movie coming soon (in Europe).

http://streif-film.at/home/

post #5 of 9

post #6 of 9

Got 3-D glasses?

post #7 of 9
In here there is a segment that shows how the "Gran Risa" in Alta Badia is "groomed" (in Italian the term is "barrata" from the verb "barrare" , lit "to bar")The term comes from the times when an iron bar was used to smoothe an level out the slope (I think).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Bv-Y_Vj18M
post #8 of 9
Any details on where or how we could get this film in the States.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 

Nice pic I got from a friend.

The pic shows some prep work for the slalom course at Val Gardena.

Notice that they are "grooming" with fire hoses.

If you have never skied on an injected course you have missed an interesting skiing experience.

I don't believe that is actually an injected course. When they inject a course they use an apparatus on the hose end that is pushed down into the snow with 5 or 6 water  nozzles and actually inject the water down into the snow!

 

 

 

Injecting the Streif with water. Photo: © Kitzbühel Ski Club

“The average weight of powder snow is 50-100kg per square metre,” says Dr Huber. “On the Streif we aim for a weight of 500-600kg per square metre.”

They achieve that weight and density by drilling the snow with water. They’ve even invented a special machine for the job, called an injection bar, which shoots high-pressure jets of water into the snow to a depth of about 50cm. The water squirts down into the snow, then rises back up to the surface, humidifying the whole section of piste. (The water pressure varies, as does the gap between the jets of water, according to conditions.) Meanwhile, the holes left by the jets of water allow cold air to seep down deep into the snow. The process creates a very hard – but not icy – surface throughout the snowpack, rather than just on the surface,.
 

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Why do they do it? “It’s not to make the race tougher or more spectacular,” explains Huber, “it’s to make the racing surface more consistent, and therefore safer. That’s the one thing racers really want from a course – to be able to ski the same snow conditions from the top to the bottom.” The process also helps to preserve the surface from wear and tear once the Hahnenkamm programme starts. Even so, 15-20cm of snow can be scraped away in the course of a single weekend.

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