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Anyone read the newly published psia manuals?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

As the title asks I am curious how many of you have read them and if they have anything new to add about modern instruction. 

 

Here at my mountain we just went through the first day of returning instructor training and this was brought up. Our trainer who is a examiner and very accomplished instructor has said there is nothing that was changed just restated in different ways. I am curious about that since I believe the two old manuals that were changed were written about 10-15 years ago, and that was before the popularity of rockered big skies that we see a lot of our students skiing on. I have had to reinvent ideas to work with some of these students, not drastically but I believe somethings have changed in the realm of instruction and would be rather surprised if our manuals didn't have something new to add to this discussion.

 

So before I order these two new books I am asking some of you who have read them to weigh in. 

post #2 of 15

I'm sure they'll give homage to rocker. Afterall, the authors brought rockered skis to Interski and talked about it there. How do you feel you have changed your lessons to accommodate it though?

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

I'm sure they'll give homage to rocker. Afterall, the authors brought rockered skis to Interski and talked about it there. How do you feel you have changed your lessons to accommodate it though?

That was just one example of changes I have made to my lessons in the last 10 years, I have probably changed more things then just dealing with big rockered skies. Though if pressed I would probably have a hard time expressing exactly what those things are. 

 

As to what I have changed regarding rockered skies. I used to believe bump skiing with anything over 100 width and 189 length  would be ridiculous but a long time 15 year old student helped me prove that assumption wrong. Playing with a very flat ski and A LOT of rotary movement we worked on very tight hard packed bumps and were very successful. He has no interest in skiing anything other then his massive skies. Both of us benefited from his stubbornness. But truthfully the more I think about it, writing this, the fundamentals of what I teach haven't changed all that drastically if at all. I had a 45 year old on a pair of gotamas last year that wanted to run nastar and with some work, using the same old same old, got him his silver when he had never been able to medal in his life. So maybe I should rethink if I have really changed much at all even with the advent of new ski tech. 

 

But the question still stands. Are there any real difference in the new books? I may have jumped the gun on my original post as I keep thinking about the question. 

post #4 of 15

I have the new manual, but it's a tough read from front to back for those of us who have been around a while. It's a tough read because there is a lot of old news reprinted. The new stuff is in there, but there are different ways to take it. Balance is gone as a movement. It's now an input and an outcome. But if you talk to old timers, this really isn't different from before. What's really new is the 5 fundamentals, except they aren't really new things either (e.g. balance against the outside ski). The intent is that this method of presentation accommodates all of the tech changes (e.g. rocker skis). Another big but subtle change is a shift of focus from movements to examining what the ski snow interaction is. It looks these focus changes are already being reflected in exams across multiple regions (I just finished an Eastern "trainers" clinic where we reviewed the changes to the exams this year and the links to the new manual/terminology and the updated National Standards document. There is an ebook version of the manual that you may want to consider. A lot of the reference pictures in the printed manual have QR codes that link to online videos. In the ebook version you just click on the video to play it.

 

So the short answer is that whether you think that there is not much new stuff or that there is a ton of new stuff depends on your perspective. If you're anal retentive, it's not just that there is new stuff. There are also whole new ways to chew on it. For example, I have a Jeb Boyd powerpoint presentation that presents the same info differently. This works well as an add on to everything else (the manual, the standards, the on snow clinics) vs a replacement for them.

 

FYI - my resort bought a bunch of manuals at a substantial discount and is passing the savings on to the staff, but silly me paid full price to get a hot off the press copy.

post #5 of 15

Here's a link to get a powerpoint presentation from Jeb Boyd. Buried in there is a take on the 5 fundamentals. It's not as good as having Jeb there to talk to the slides, but it might help.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Here's a link to get a powerpoint presentation from Jeb Boyd. Buried in there is a take on the 5 fundamentals. It's not as good as having Jeb there to talk to the slides, but it might help.

Rusty.  Link not showing up in your post.  Can you try again?  Thanks

post #7 of 15

I'd like to see that too.

post #8 of 15

Link please?  I heard a presentation from the Boyd brothers today.  Sounded good.  It's always a pleasure to hear National information from the horses' mouths, so to speak.
In answer to a question, they said the manual includes different ways of initiating turns given differing intents.  Anyone read this stuff yet?

post #9 of 15

ok - link should be fixed now

post #10 of 15

Yep.  Jeb gave the same presentation to us today.  Followed by MA with Matt Boyd, who showed us how this approach plays out on snow.

post #11 of 15

I haven't read it, but thanks for the reminder. A couple of weeks ago, my instructor suggested I buy it. It slipped my mind, but I just ordered the physical + digital package. As I've never read one before, I think I'll be pretty happy with it.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I haven't read it, but thanks for the reminder. A couple of weeks ago, my instructor suggested I buy it. It slipped my mind, but I just ordered the physical + digital package. As I've never read one before, I think I'll be pretty happy with it.

 

 

Pick up a copy of LeMaster's book as well.

post #13 of 15

I'll second marko's suggestion.  LeMaster's most recent book is the ultimate in contemporary thinking about the technical aspects of skiing.

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I haven't read it, but thanks for the reminder. A couple of weeks ago, my instructor suggested I buy it. It slipped my mind, but I just ordered the physical + digital package. As I've never read one before, I think I'll be pretty happy with it.

 

 

Pick up a copy of LeMaster's book as well.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

I'll second marko's suggestion.  LeMaster's most recent book is the ultimate in contemporary thinking about the technical aspects of skiing.

 

Amazon tells me that LeMaster's book is "method of waterfowl identification." Could you be more specific?

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
Amazon tells me that LeMaster's book is "method of waterfowl identification." Could you be more specific?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Skiing-Ron-LeMaster-ebook/dp/B0041OTAOI/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417970619&sr=1-1&keywords=ron+lemaster

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