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Head Rev 85 pro vs Head Venturi 95

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

Which one of these skis is better for both on-piste (carving) and off-piste (not more than a foot of snow)?

 

THanks!

post #2 of 18

If you're spending more time on piste, the 85 Pro.  If you're splitting your time 50:50, and the off piste is only occasionally a foot deep, the 85 Pro again.  If you're spending the majority of your time off piste, in at least several inches of new snow, the Venturi.

 

It comes down to which part of your day you're willing to compromise.  If you ski off piste 25% of your day, but are looking to maximise your fun during that 25%, then the Venturi might be your preferred ski.  If you're willing to admit that you'll have fun in 12 inches of new snow on just about any ski, and want to maximise your fun on piste, then the 85 Pro will likely be the ski.

 

I demoed the Venturi (191) and the Rev 90 (177) in late July.  I was impressed with both.  The Venturi held up well underfoot on a firm piste and provided enough support from the tail [edit - and is really quite damp for such a light feeling ski].  The 90 was a fun all-rounder with a relatively short radius for that width of ski, along with a big, surfy tip.  Note, I've read a lot of reviews of the 85 Pro, but I've never been on it. 

 

Hard to make a bad call really, and it will come down to the way you want to enjoy your day.

 

Best of luck.


Edited by sinbad7 - 12/1/14 at 2:37pm
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post
 

If you're spending more time on piste, the 85 Pro.  If you're splitting your time 50:50, and the off piste is only occasionally a foot deep, the 85 Pro again.  If you're spending the majority of your time off piste, in at least several inches of new snow, the Venturi.

 

It comes down to which part of your day you're willing to compromise.  If you ski off piste 25% of your day, but are looking to maximise your fun during that 25%, then the Venturi might be your preferred ski.  If you're willing to admit that you'll have fun in 12 inches of new snow on just about any ski, and want to maximise your fun on piste, then the 85 Pro will likely be the ski.

 

I demoed the Venturi (191) and the Rev 90 (177) in late July.  I was impressed with both.  The Venturi held up well underfoot on a firm piste and provided enough support from the tail [edit - and is really quite damp for such a light feeling ski].  The 90 was a fun all-rounder with a relatively short radius for that width of ski, along with a big, surfy tip.  Note, I've read a lot of reviews of the 85 Pro, but I've never never been on it. 

 

Hard to make a bad call really, and it will come down to the way you want to enjoy your day.

 

Best of luck.

Hi,

 

thank you very much for your reply. Do you know what boots would you recommend for pro 85? Would ski boots with 80 flex be good for head 85 pro?

post #4 of 18

Ski boots are one of the most fitted things you'll ever buy.  Choosing the right boot is one of the best ways to improve your skiing.  Choosing the wrong boot is so common as to be almost a right of passage for up and coming skiers.

 

The very best advice you can take is to find yourself a good boot fitter and put your faith and confidence in their experience and expertise.

 

Here's a glossary of boot fitting terms -

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-terms-and-glossary

 

Here's an explanation of some of the standard boot fitting procedures -

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

And here's a list of boot fitting masters -

http://www.epicski.com/t/3986/epicski-index-of-boot-fitting-masters

 

I have a standard spiel about boots and I'll send it to you via private message.  The abbreviated answer is to work with a boot fitter.  Start by buying either a custom or off-the-shelf footbed, as recommended by that fitter, then start trying on boots under the watchful eye of the same fitter.

 

Oh, remember an 80 flex doesn't compare directly across brands.  One manufacturer's 80 flex boot will flex differently to another's.

 

PM coming up.  Best of luck.


Edited by sinbad7 - 11/30/14 at 6:04pm
post #5 of 18

I agree with the above: 85 Pro is the better choice for most of the time. It has a lot of float in the tip, a wide tip, fun carver, fun bump ski, fun on piste, fun in crud. The Venturi is a solid ski, tip is a little more damp, gonna have more float, not as snappy.  If you want a hybrid of the 2, the REV 90 or 98 is also available.  I am skiing a REV 98 184cm as my bigger ski this year; I am light and don't need a lot of width unless we have a big winter (not predicted, but maybe if I buy narrower skis it will happen) but I like the length for stability

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathewcro View Post
 

Hi,

 

thank you very much for your reply. Do you know what boots would you recommend for pro 85? Would ski boots with 80 flex be good for head 85 pro?

 

 

Mathew, if you're an adult male and not unusually small AND skiing an 80 flex boot, you might not really be ready for either ski. Boot fitter first. Skis second.

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

 

 

Mathew, if you're an adult male and not unusually small AND skiing an 80 flex boot, you might not really be ready for either ski. Boot fitter first. Skis second.


Hello Marko,

 

why do you think I won't be ready for head rev 85 pro? 

 

I currently have the following:

 

Boots: Nordica sportmachine x fi 80 (flex 80)

Ski: Head Integrale 005 (170cm)

 

 

The boots fit my foot very well and were fitted as they should be.

 

I was wondering whether I should buy new boots (currently looking at Head AdaptEdge 100/90) for the Head Rev 85 pro as it is stiffer ski than Head Integrale 005.

 

My weight is: 200lbs and height 5' 10" (178 cm).

 

Also, do you know some better alternatives in the same category of rev 85 pro?

post #8 of 18
IMO, both the skis you mention aren't really entry level products. That said, they can both be skied by anyone who is a relatively athletic intermediate, and in the case of the 85p, is an excellent ski of you're getting some coaching. You're 5'10" 200#. At your size, I'd think a 110'ish boot would be the minimum necessary for you not to over flex. If you were my client and you were having trouble bending the cuff of your 80-100 flex boot, I'd look at your ankles range of motion, specifically at your dorsiflexion. (Ability to pull your toes up toward your knee while seated with your thigh parallel to the ground, and lower leg perpendicular again to the ground. If there's a mobility issue, you may need heel lifts. Again, your fitter and/or ski coach should be able to check and experiment with this.

Why is this important? The boot is the key element in your ski/snow suspension system. Imagine a softish commuter car shock in a higher performance car. Too soft and you've obviated all the advantages of the power plant and performance steering you've paid for. Too stiff, and you've put a GP shock on an off road situation and will get your teeth rattled out and have a hard time even holding on to the steering wheel. At a certain level, gear components needs to match the outcome application. IMO, I don't think an 80 flex boot will effectively drive your ski choices for a guy your size. Your also well beyond a 170 length given your height and weight for either the Rev or the Venturi of you're now a solid athletic upper intermediate skier. At 200#, even at 5'10", you'll need at least the 177 rev and 181 Venturi. Personally, I'd ski both in the 184 (rev) and 191(Venturi), but I'm 5'11" ~ 6'0" 205#ish and have been at this awhile.

Without seeing your feet and looking only at your boot choices, I'm guessing you have a higher volume foot. If the Head product works for your foot, a Vector 115 or possibly a 125 might work ( you can remove the top pin on the spine of the boot to soften the flex of either vector), but the choice should be directed/discussed with your shop/fitter. Anyhow, just the thoughts of one guy amongst many on the Internet. smile.gif
post #9 of 18
Ditto. Well said, markojp
post #10 of 18

I decided to pick up some new skis on Black Friday and I found a great deal on Head Rev 85 pro 2014 - $375 inc tax and shipping and including bindings.

 

Me 6'0" 225 Lbs 47 years old - I would say I am a pretty strong intermediate without classifying myself as advanced, but borderline.

 

I used to ski a lot when I was younger - took massive break living abroad, kids, blah blah.

 

Started again a few years ago (more like 10+) and stuck to on piste on the East Coast with a trip out to Utah. I bought a pair of Rossignol Power Pulsion 9x for $100 or so about 12 years ago which were super shaped skis for me considering I used to ski a 205 GS ski which was dead straight and I was also told to get a 174 length which seemed crazy to me but it was for recreational skiing and it was $100.

 

To be honest, I liked them then, and I do not dislike them now. I enjoy making lots of turns and I do not ski fast enough to scare anyone but myself occasionally, so stability has not been a problem.

 

However, now one of the kids is older and skiing more advanced terrain, I would like to venture into some powder (6-12") not heli skiing just yet, and I am ready to spend a bit more time on the bumps.

 

Before I took a lesson or two thought it would be wise to get a ski that could deal with it better.Was looking at Volkl RTM 80 or  84 or the Enduro but the Head Rev 85 Pro deal came up, the reviews were good and it seemed to be the type of ski I was looking for so I bought them - I know you should demo and try and compare, but that is not me. If it works for me and the deal is right then I pull trigger - Same for cars, houses and women.

 

I am sure I will be happy with the ski. I would have got the 186, but the deal was only for the 177 so that is what I got.

 

However, here is my question - The ski comes with the SX-10 binding which is a Tyrolla but joint production with Head.

 

The picture looks like a two piece binding but the description and the CS rep both said a power rail binding (They come with the skis but not mounted) so maybe there is a separate plate, but the question is do I need more binding?

 

I have a Look Binding on the old Pulsions that is a 12 DIN max and I have had it on 8 since I got them which has been fine - Would 8 on the SX-10 be fine?

 

Thanks

 

Hosk

post #11 of 18

From a straight DIN perspective, the SX-10 should be fine.  

 

However, I don't believe this binding comes with a rail system.  Tyrolia does have a "Powerrail" line that is also in your DIN range; top end 11 or 12 depending on model.  Maybe the seller is also including a race plate?

post #12 of 18
Something is odd
Thats not the standard system binding for the rev 85 pro.
post #13 of 18
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

IMO, both the skis you mention aren't really entry level products. That said, they can both be skied by anyone who is a relatively athletic intermediate, and in the case of the 85p, is an excellent ski of you're getting some coaching. You're 5'10" 200#. At your size, I'd think a 110'ish boot would be the minimum necessary for you not to over flex. If you were my client and you were having trouble bending the cuff of your 80-100 flex boot, I'd look at your ankles range of motion, specifically at your dorsiflexion. (Ability to pull your toes up toward your knee while seated with your thigh parallel to the ground, and lower leg perpendicular again to the ground. If there's a mobility issue, you may need heel lifts. Again, your fitter and/or ski coach should be able to check and experiment with this.

Why is this important? The boot is the key element in your ski/snow suspension system. Imagine a softish commuter car shock in a higher performance car. Too soft and you've obviated all the advantages of the power plant and performance steering you've paid for. Too stiff, and you've put a GP shock on an off road situation and will get your teeth rattled out and have a hard time even holding on to the steering wheel. At a certain level, gear components needs to match the outcome application. IMO, I don't think an 80 flex boot will effectively drive your ski choices for a guy your size. Your also well beyond a 170 length given your height and weight for either the Rev or the Venturi of you're now a solid athletic upper intermediate skier. At 200#, even at 5'10", you'll need at least the 177 rev and 181 Venturi. Personally, I'd ski both in the 184 (rev) and 191(Venturi), but I'm 5'11" ~ 6'0" 205#ish and have been at this awhile.

Without seeing your feet and looking only at your boot choices, I'm guessing you have a higher volume foot. If the Head product works for your foot, a Vector 115 or possibly a 125 might work ( you can remove the top pin on the spine of the boot to soften the flex of either vector), but the choice should be directed/discussed with your shop/fitter. Anyhow, just the thoughts of one guy amongst many on the Internet. smile.gif


Marco, thank you for your lengthy reply. I started skiing 2 years ago  and consider myself beginner intermediate. I want to buy these skis and the boots for them because I intend to use them in the next 5 years at least, by that time I should get upper intermediate.

 

I have very wide foot (110 mm) so that is why I asked whether the adaptedge boot would be for me because they have the highest volume of head boots.There are no boot fitters in my country so I would have to rely on what I learn on the internet to get the best boot.

post #15 of 18
Other boots with volume... Salomon X-Pro series. Lange SX series. Tecnica HVL. You've got some options.
post #16 of 18

Remember that the last width quoted for any boot (e.g. 98mm or 102mm) is for the mondo 26 boot.  Larger boots are wider than the quoted last width.

 

You have a boot (Sportmachine) that was originally fitted and which suits you fine.  There's your baseline.  Doing a bit of a search it seems the Sportmachine is a "medium wide last", quoted as 102mm.

 

Honestly, since you have boots and describe yourself as a beginner intermediate, I would just go ski them.  Get to know your new skis, and how they react to the input you're giving via your 80 flex boots.  Improve your skiing as much as you can with what you've got.  As and when you feel the boots are holding you back (i.e. when they feel too soft in flex for how you want to ski) then upgrade to something else.

 

Best of luck.

post #17 of 18

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mathewcro View Post
 

Marco, thank you for your lengthy reply. I started skiing 2 years ago  and consider myself beginner intermediate. 

 

mathewcro, I just want to say "bravo," in total sincerity, for being possibly the first new male poster on EpicSki - I assume you're male from your username - ever to utter the phrase "consider myself" immediately followed by the word "beginner." If I had a nickel for every guy who walks into the room, having managed to hockey-stop (or not) his way down some groomer somewhere that has a black diamond sign nailed to a tree at the top of the run, and about the second thing he says, before taking off his coat, is, "I consider myself an advanced skier..." ... Bravo. Humility still exists.

post #18 of 18

Yes the price can not be beat, even if I had to get different bindings. I asked the sales guy on the phone how come the photo showed a two piece binding but the spec said power rail, and he said ignore the photo, it is the spec that counts, so maybe I am getting a "plate" with it too. The situation is not helped by the fact that I am not entirely sure what a power rail is. I guess I will find out in a few days when they arrive.

 

Here is the pic of the package I bought which shows the bindings I think I am getting

 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/head-rev-85-pro-skis-sx-10-bindings.aspx#image=84932/389343/head-rev-85-pro-skis-sx-10-bindings-2014-177.jpg?avad=55963_a78c02ea&utm_source=AL&utm_medium=Affiliate

 

and here is a pic of this years model with what I am guessing is the standard system binding, and $400 more...

 

http://www.evo.com/ski-packages/head-rev-85-pro-skis-prd-12-bindings.aspx#image=80854/376395/head-rev-85-pro-skis-prd-12-bindings-2015-163.jpg

 

Is a power rail the plate that goes between the two bindings and under the boot? What does it do?   

 

To Mathewcro the poster talking about boots. I had the same problem but to a lesser extent which was that my feet were just slightly too wide for 102 widths and they would not feel tight, but would be just enough to nip the circulation which meant my toes would go cold and numb.

 

I bought the Tecnica HVL which is a 105 width I believe - Could not be happier. Do not know if this solves your 110 problem, but HVL stands for High Volume Liner so I guess you could do something such as a low volume liner or whatever. I do not know anything about boot fitting but it is night and day having boots that fit.     

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