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MA for the skier in the video

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

The video quality is not good, but the movement of the skier can still be seen. At 00:04, the skier, IMHO, showed A-frame, which indicated the skier didn't release his old downhill ski and tip it to the little edge early enough. Also, it seems to me the skier was banking a little bit between 00:03 to 00:04. However, once the skier started skiing, banking and A-frame disappeared. Any other issues you guys see from this video? Any suggestion, analysis, and fixes are appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

post #2 of 8

Hi flowfreely.  Knee angulation with associated A-framing is sometimes used for that first turn, to help foster balance while waiting for the speed to ramp up and the external forces we use to help balance us kick in.  Not anything to be concerned with, you're right focus more on the turns that follow. 

 

The rest of the video is so bouncy, it's hard to provide detailed feedback.  From the first couple turns I could see before the camera person set off down the hill, stance and balance look good.  Good edge control, with a consistent turn shape and amount of skid in the turn.  Meaning, no big tail push and washed track happening.  I see a push of the tails to start the turn.  Not a big deal, but I would have this person focus on trying to be more patient and subtle at the start of their turn.  Steer the legs into it gently, avoiding the tendency to push the tails uphill aggressively.  

 

Sorry I can't be of more help, I just can't see the skiing very well.  Best in future filmings to get a camera that has a zoom, stand mid hill and use it to keep the skier full frame as he skis to you then past you.


Edited by Rick - 11/30/14 at 8:04am
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

Hi flowfreely.  Knee angulation with associated A-framing is sometimes used for that first turn, to help foster balance while waiting for the speed to ramp up and the external forces we use to help balance us kick in.  Not anything to be concerned with, you're right focus more on the turns that follow. 

How do you figure? popcorn.gif
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi, Rick, yes, I am going to get a camcorder, and thanks for the MA and the suggestion of starting the turn with patience.

 

Knee angulation with associated A-framing is sometimes used for that first turn, to help foster balance:

 

I am not sure if I fully understand this. It'd be great if you can elaborate it a little bit. Is there a cure for this or is it a common thing?

 

Thanks again.

post #5 of 8

Flexing in the transition will help. 

 

Epic article on A-framing.

http://www.epicski.com/t/123504/knee-safety-zone

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by flowfreely View Post
 

Hi, Rick, yes, I am going to get a camcorder, and thanks for the MA and the suggestion of starting the turn with patience.

 

Knee angulation with associated A-framing is sometimes used for that first turn, to help foster balance:

 

I am not sure if I fully understand this. It'd be great if you can elaborate it a little bit. Is there a cure for this or is it a common thing?

 

Thanks again.

 

 

When speed is very slow, such as when first pushing off from a stand still on flat terrain, there sometimes are not enough centrifugal forces present to keep us in balance if we allow the hip to move inside the skis as we put them on edge.   One of the ways to compensate for this force devoid environment is to just tip the outside knee to put the ski on edge and let the body remain in balance above the skis.    If in doing that the inside knee is not tipped on edge also, an A-frame will appear.  

 

But like I said, if it happens not a big deal to worry about, unless that's the photo you want for the family album.  Here's a way to help reduce the need.  Always start your run by pushing off straight down the mountain.  Let a bit of speed build skiing straight down the hill before starting your first turn, which will just be a half turn.  The forces will thus be given a chance to build up, and you'll lose the impetus to knee angulate.  

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Flexing in the transition will help. 



Epic article on A-framing.
http://www.epicski.com/t/123504/knee-safety-zone

This doesn't work so effectively at the speed the OP is skiing. The forces he's managing are relatively small. Let's see if we can find a less extreme example that commensurate with what the OP is doing. smile.gif

I still don't understand A-framing even in the example of a slow speed start. It implies pushing against the old ski, not traveling forward along the length of the new if it's a minor 'skate' move. In the OP's case, he's lost his outside ski because he has lost structure and is no longer balanced on or along its length. The a frame instant is a simple 'recovery'. To the OP, I'm not one to get too involved in MA and instructional forums, but I will say I see in general a consistent turn shape both left and right. I see a largely disciplined upper body with the shoulders and hips following the direction of the skis. I also see a 'push' against the outside ski and an 'up' to unweight and release the old outside edge. It's more pronounced on your left footed turns... the same foot on your first turn a-frame, no? hmmmmm. What I'd like to see or change would be to see more 'separation through the arc' to use the words of JF Beaulieu that will result in 1. Being balanced in transition and commensurately able to release the old edge by both tipping your skis toward the new edges and moving your center of mass across the skis' direction of travel without any 'up' or 'push' off, and 2. Gain the ability to balance and manage forces (ride the pressure continuously through all phases of the turn from outside ski to outside ski. Here's a link to a nice vid of a simple progression by the man himself and highly applicable to your terrain:




For fun, before you give JF's progression a try, take a few runs and imagine your skis applying exactly the same force on the snow... Equal pressure through the arc AND transition. Here's the money question: To do this, what do you need to do to start your transition? When you try JF's progression, do steps 1~3 SLOWLY! Notice how JF is maintaining constant equal speed via turn shape AND moving DOWN the hill. Ok, I'm out for now. Have fun and good luck!
Edited by markojp - 11/30/14 at 10:28pm
post #8 of 8
Bump for the OP.
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