or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › DIN setting adjustment for new skis
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

DIN setting adjustment for new skis

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I just ordered my first skis from an online shop. I already told them by boot sole length and they will mount the bindings accordingly and ship it that way. However, they told me that I still need to bring the ski to ski shop to "set the forward pressure, Din and test the bindings with your boot and adjust them to your height and weight to ensure safety and stability."

 

Today I went to a few ski shops asking how much this would cost me, and they said something between $40-50 with a wait time of ~2 weeks.

 

Last year I already had my boots and was renting only the skis. That time I remember it was taking less than 2 minutes for the person to adjust the DIN to my boots. I remember he was just playing with a screw. So, I don't understand why they are quoting this long wait time and very expensive price for doing this.

 

My questions is how important do you think it is for me to bring the skis to ski shop and pay this price for the DIN setting? is this something I can do by myself? Also do you know any ski shop around boston-cambridge area that offers reasonable prices for these kind of things?

 

Thanks a lot for the help!

post #2 of 54

They may be quoting you a full mounting price, compared to a binding adjustment/ final check.

 

Assuming there are no issues, 

A binding adjustment/test check should only take a few minutes, and cost about $25 at the extreme most expensive and usually way less.  The majority of the cost is more for usage of the testing machine rather than physical labor or time.  (if they're charging you this much but aren't actually testing on a test machine, then you're getting ripped off).

 

If you do not have ski shops near you, you will be OK doing this at whatever ski area you are going to, where there is likely more overall ski volume and competition among rental shops to get a market price for services (as well as expertise).  They should have you in and out in about 10min (if no line).  

 

You can do the settings yourself, it isn't rocket science, and is the same procedure that you witnessed when you rented skis and that got done in 2min or so.

 

But you can't do the 2nd part to test the binding at home.  This can only be done at a shop.  Rental shops only have to test their skis at a minimum of once a season or so, so this isn't something they do for each rental.  But the majority of rental shops that have any volume and does ski service will have the testing machine somewhere in the back that gets used pretty frequently.

 

It is a safety issue so if you don't know what you are doing, you should stop.   An analogy is like working on your brakes on your car.  Accordingly, people are wary to give advice on the exact procedures for liability reasons.


Edited by raytseng - 11/29/14 at 7:06pm
post #3 of 54

You can do it your self! 

 

What bindings?

 

What level skier are you?

 

I Beginner

II Intermediate

III Advanced 

III+ expert

 

What is you Boot Sole length?

 

What is your Height,weight & age. 

 

The most difficult part will be setting the forward pressure which is , easily done. 

 

I have not had a shop set any our bindings in years.

 

Even $25.00 is ridiculous for this!

post #4 of 54
As I mentioned, its less about for the setting. It's for the test.  

You're right, the high majority of the time the binding is going to be fine and you paid for nothing; many people wing it without testing their bindings and do fine.  But it is the general advice to test rather than be sorry.  

 

And even the test, it's not the cost of the labor, it's amortizing access to the machine.  

 

As far as costs, It's like getting an alignment on your car.  It does not cost a mechanic any money to run your car on the alignment rack, especially if it's going to test out as needing no change.  But they paid $10,000 for that hunter laser system so need to get that money back somehow

post #5 of 54

Set the DIN yourself and go skiing.  If they were used bindings I'd be more worried about testing. 

post #6 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

As I mentioned, its less about for the setting. It's for the test.  
You're right, the high majority of the time the binding is going to be fine and you paid for nothing; many people wing it without testing their bindings and do fine.  But it is the general advice to test rather than be sorry.  

And even the test, it's not the cost of the labor, it's amortizing access to the machine.  

As far as costs, It's like getting an alignment on your car.  It does not cost a mechanic any money to run your car on the alignment rack, especially if it's going to test out as needing no change.  But they paid $10,000 for that hunter laser system so need to get that money back somehow

It's really about the shop's exposure to liability. No one would buy a machine if it weren't legally wise to do so. To the OP, it takes 2 weeks because they only have x number of staff and have a huge queue of skis mounts, testing, and tunes to do this time of year. You aren't getting the service for free or reduced cost because you didn't buy any gear from them. The Internet seller has no idea about the condition of you boot soles, so they'd be foolish to leave themselves open to litigation from their ski/binding Internet customers. And sure, I'm guessing A-man's boot soles are in great shape so he can do most of this himself. He's right. It isn't hard if all the components are in nominal condition. Unfortunately, this is often not the case. This is why you take it to a shop. In the future, you'll do it weeks before the snow flys, but for now, chalk it up to 'lessons learned'. Wait until you start paying for boot work for an internet purchase and realize it would have been cheaper to buy from a fitter/shop that provides boot work as part of the purchase price. smile.gif
post #7 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

You can do it your self! 

 

 

 

What level skier are you?

 

I Beginner

II Intermediate

III Advanced 

III+ expert

FAIL.

post #8 of 54

I'd only add that the first check on new boots/bindings is fairly important.  It's important that the toe piece height is correct, the pre-release tension is set properly and that there's no binding in the release action.  These things are fairly easy to spot if you've been doing it for a while (sometimes you're also paying for experience..) but if this if your first time you might not notice them.  If you really don't want to pay to get it done, make sure you at least release the boot with your hand to simulate the release test.  You shouldn't have any binding or sticking when releasing.  Test all the release modes to be sure.  It's not a DIN test but hey, they're your legs..if you're good with it, go for it.

post #9 of 54
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot for the insightful answers. I guess when it comes to safety and health it is hard to argue against even when the odds of something being wrong is low. I searched a little more and found out another store that told me that they can do it for $15 and in one day. I guess the main problem is that in large stores such as REI etc. they have a fixed price for binding mounting and adjustment service and they don't have the mechanism to offer a lower price if they don't have to mount the bindings and do a simpler adjustment. Similarly as you said the lines are fixed regardless of the smallness of the work. The store I found is a local ski shop, so although it is hard to find them online, they can do more customized jobs and offer prices that only reflect what they do.  

post #10 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

You can do it your self! 

 

What bindings?

 

What level skier are you?

 

I Beginner

II Intermediate

III Advanced 

III+ expert

 

What is you Boot Sole length?

 

What is your Height,weight & age. 

 

The most difficult part will be setting the forward pressure which is , easily done. 

 

I have not had a shop set any our bindings in years.

 

Even $25.00 is ridiculous for this!

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

post #11 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

I'm not disagreeing with your edits in blue, I think they make sense. But I have never been in a ski shop/rental shop and heard it referred to like that. Is that a somewhat new definition?

 

 

I work in a rental shop and will probably bring this up with management when I get back.

post #12 of 54

I have a slightly different situation.  My left knee has finally healed from a pretty serious crash at Brighton last December.  My bindings did not release and I suspect I may have them set too high.  I am planning on a Denver ski adventure next weekend and I won't have much time to get my skis looked at (flying in from Hawaii to SLC on Thursday morning to pick up my ski gear, driving to Avon/Beaver early Friday morning).  Can anyone suggest the name of a good ski shop anywhere in the Salt Lake area that may be open to helping a winged weekend warrior with a small budget and a tight time window?

post #13 of 54

Skier Classification does not equated to ability - it has to do with the bias in the release/retention setting setting that the skier requests.  If done correctly an expert skier could choose a I type classification.

 

 

Inspection and testing - your asking the shop to accept all the liability relating to the procedure but you only want to pay $ 25.

post #14 of 54

Thanks... money is not a major issue.  Just looking for value, fair treatment, and a quick turn around time.

post #15 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 

I'd only add that the first check on new boots/bindings is fairly important.  It's important that the toe piece height is correct, the pre-release tension is set properly and that there's no binding in the release action.  These things are fairly easy to spot if you've been doing it for a while (sometimes you're also paying for experience..) but if this if your first time you might not notice them.  If you really don't want to pay to get it done, make sure you at least release the boot with your hand to simulate the release test.  You shouldn't have any binding or sticking when releasing.  Test all the release modes to be sure.  It's not a DIN test but hey, they're your legs..if you're good with it, go for it.

Most bindings have self adjusting toe height. That's one reason I asked what binding?

post #16 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by gilberoni View Post
 

Skier Classification does not equated to ability - it has to do with the bias in the release/retention setting setting that the skier requests.  If done correctly an expert skier could choose a I type classification.

 

 

Inspection and testing - your asking the shop to accept all the liability relating to the procedure but you only want to pay $ 25.

What?

post #17 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
 

I'm not disagreeing with your edits in blue, I think they make sense. But I have never been in a ski shop/rental shop and heard it referred to like that. Is that a somewhat new definition?

 

 

I work in a rental shop and will probably bring this up with management when I get back.

I was just trying to make it simple for the guy. I know what the skier types mean.

 

And let's be real here... the chart is just a general starting point.... not by any means an exact science how ever you describe it!

post #18 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

Almost all NEWER bindings need no toe height adjustment.  What Atomic race series and what Maybe a Rossi or some flavor of Salomon. Would have gotten there once he answered what freaking binidng it is!

 

Did you notice 1st question was    WHAT BINDING IS IT???   

 

Additonally, this was the beginning of a conversation, as we pinned down some of the variables, I assure you I would have pinned down the skiers ability further.   

 

Do you have any idea how many bindings I have mounted and adjusted over the last 20 years??? NO.....50 years?


Edited by Atomicman - 11/30/14 at 12:17pm
post #19 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

I'm not disagreeing with your edits in blue, I think they make sense. But I have never been in a ski shop/rental shop and heard it referred to like that. Is that a somewhat new definition?

 

 

I work in a rental shop and will probably bring this up with management when I get back.

post #20 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
 

I'm not disagreeing with your edits in blue, I think they make sense. But I have never been in a ski shop/rental shop and heard it referred to like that. Is that a somewhat new definition?

 

 

I work in a rental shop and will probably bring this up with management when I get back.

I was just trying to make it simple for the guy. I know what the skier types mean.

 

And let's be real here... the chart is just a general starting point.... not by any means an exact science how ever you describe it!

Thats why there is an initial setting, then the binding is tested to get the final setting, something that cannot be done at home unless you have the proper testing devices which I am sure he doesn't have..which is part of what that ridiculous $25.00 goes toward paying for and keeping up to spec. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

Almost NO new bindings need toe height adjustment. 

 

Did you notice 1st question was    WHAT BINDING IS IT???   

 

Additonally, this was the beginning of a conversation, as we pinned down some of the variables, I assure you I would have pinned down the skiers ability further.   

 

Do you any idea how many bindings I have mounted and adjusted over the last 50 years???

Yes, you asked what binding it was but the your classifications were incorrect and saying the costs were rediculous were off base. I am sure you have mounted and adjusted about as many as I have. 

post #21 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations.    RACERS PAY NO ATTENTION TO DIN SETTINGS. I HAVE SEEN NUMEROUS TEENAGE GIRLS THAT WEIGH 120 LBS. SKI ON AN ATOMIC 10.18 IN DH & SG. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Thats why there is an initial setting, then the binding is tested to get the final setting, something that cannot be done at home unless you have the proper testing devices which I am sure he doesn't have..which is part of what that ridiculous $25.00 goes toward paying for and keeping up to spec. 

 

Yes, you asked what binding it was but the your classifications were incorrect and saying the costs were rediculous were off base. I am sure you have mounted and adjusted about as many as I have. 

Fair enough on the cost. :beercheer:  GOTTA RUN, GOT SOME BINDINGS TO ADJUST!:D


Edited by Atomicman - 11/30/14 at 12:37pm
post #22 of 54

My Volkl Kendo has a Marker Griffon 13.  My last tune was done at the Cole Sport shop in Park City last November (2013).  I did not remember to ask about checking and testing the bindings at the time and I am not even sure whether the average Groupon "tune and wax" at that shop would even include such a service.  Still wondering if anyone has a suggestion for a fast and conscientious shop in SLC, PC, BCC, LCC... ?

post #23 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Most bindings have self adjusting toe height. That's one reason I asked what binding?


Sorry, just a more general comment that not all bindings are self-adjust toe height.  You are correct, most are, especially newer bindings.

post #24 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 


Sorry, just a more general comment that not all bindings are self-adjust toe height.  You are correct, most are, especially newer bindings.

I said that! :D

post #25 of 54

For the OP, I'd suggest Summit Ski and Snowboard in Framingham.  I think they have a test-only price that's in the $25 range, and they've got the best tuning operation in the region (via SkiMD), so you might as well start building a relationship with them.  Nice guys, too.

 

(and yeah, I also set my own binding settings and forward pressure, but learned how to do it from an expert in person first)

post #26 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBoisvert View Post
 

For the OP, I'd suggest Summit Ski and Snowboard in Framingham.  I think they have a test-only price that's in the $25 range, and they've got the best tuning operation in the region (via SkiMD), so you might as well start building a relationship with them.  Nice guys, too.

 

(and yeah, I also set my own binding settings and forward pressure, but learned how to do it from an expert in person first)

skiMD  Thumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up

post #27 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

FAIL.

Give me a freaking break!:jedi:

post #28 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Give me a freaking break!:jedi:

That's what we're trying to avoid on this thread;)

post #29 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

That's what we're trying to avoid on this thread;)

Cute:o

post #30 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I am sorry but there is much misinformation here.

 

NO to the following, bad. 

I Beginner--Conservative Skier, prefers release over retention. 

II Intermediate--Average skier, average release setting

III Advanced --Aggressive skier, prefers retention over release

III+ expert--Racer (Usually), prefers the binding NOT releasing in most situations. 

 

There are many "Expert" skiers that are "Type II" because they ski very smooth and put little stress on the binding and prefer the binding to release. 

 

Yes the forward pressure needs to be set, but many newer bindings also need toe heights adjusted.  

 

The binding should still be torqued tested to make sure the Nm's and release setting are accurate. We are still seeing the new occasional binding fail and need to be sent back.

 

$25.00 is more than fair to to the work to test a binding. You have a person write up the ticket, check in the skis, label them, bring them back to the tech, he has to get  the gear into the rotation to test, test it, do the paperwork, put the gear in the "done ski" storage and file paperwork. Customer comes back in, another employee has to help them, get paperwork, then gets skis and boot from storage bring them to the customer, go over paperwork then finalize the transaction. There is at least an hour is spent on this and if you are paying these people $15-20/hour you are loosing money at the $25.00 because it is a poor return on your investment. Lets not forget the filing and storage of the work tickets for the required 7 years. So, you are right, the $25.00 is ridiculous...rediculously CHEAP..it should be more. 

 

 

lol if your still "filing" tickets you need to get with 2014 and get some point of sale software. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › DIN setting adjustment for new skis