or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Volkl RTM 81 v. Atomic Blackeye Nomad TI
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Volkl RTM 81 v. Atomic Blackeye Nomad TI

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

New here and looking for some thoughts/advice.  Sorry in advance for the long first post, but figured I’d try to get as much info out there as I can for people to consider.  About me: in my late 40’s.  Grew up in New England and skied all over NE growing up.  Stopped skiing in my late 20s when life got in the way.  Now live in Cleveland, Ohio and have 3 kids who started skiing last year at a local hill through a school ski club.  They like it, so got them gear for this year and now need to get skis for myself, since we will become a skiing family (YES!).  I was an expert skier in the day.  Did ski a few times last year on some cheap rentals at said local hill, and was happy how natural it still felt – like riding a bike (although there was no challenge at the hill).  Expect to do most skiing at local hill (very close and good for the kids’ learning) and driving trips into NY for more robust resorts, perhaps a trip once a year or every other year back to NE or out west.

 

Last pair of skis I owned were late 80’s model Atomic ARCs (the dark blue, slalom style for any who remember) which I loved.  I used to be a fairly aggressive skier and like a responsive ski that can make quick turns, as I generally used to like to control my speed on the steep trails with short, rhythmic turns. 

 

Skis have changed a LOT since my last pair and I’ve been doing a lot of research and for the moment am targeting 2 choices.  I’m looking at the Volkl RTM 81 and the Atomic Blackeye Nomad TI.  Want a ski that can make those snappy rhythmic turns, and still be comfortable in wider/longer turns at speed and be able go all over the resort and push through a little crud/light powder if need be.  Looking to pick them up used, since outfitting an entire family is expensive. 

 

Any thoughts on the 2 I’m looking at (and any votes between those 2)?  Any ideas on other good candidates are welcome if you feel strongly, but I’ve always had a bit of a personal preference for Atomic and Volkl.  If it helps I’m 5’10 and weigh in the low 160’s.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 27
I;m a Volkl guy, but if those are your only choices, I'd go with the TI. I seem to recall they are a bit wider and they should handle the crud better. They are also close the the Volkl feel. That's why Atomic came out with that Nomad line. At your size, 165-168cm is where you should be looking for what you want to do.

You do know you need good boots too ?

I keep posting this link, http://www.skiessentials.com/ I have bought two pairs of skis from them place and a jacket. The first pair of skis was last March, I bought new in the wrapper 2011-2012 skis.

edit, make that 3 pairs of skis from them, just ordered last years Kendo's.
Edited by Max Capacity - 11/26/14 at 3:17pm
post #3 of 27

I own the RTM 81's and it will do the kind of turns you are asking for.  Excellent on ice and steeps.  Best frontside carver I have ever had.  Not as versatile in crud, but I have not skied the Nomad.  The waist widths for both the Nomad and 81'S are 81 mm. 

 

You might want to consider the RTM 84, which is a bit wider and a better crud ski.  Regarded as a great ski.  Been around longer than the 81's, so perhaps more available used.

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

I;m a Volkl guy, but if those are your only choices, I'd go with the TI. I seem to recall they are a bit wider and they should handle the crud better. They are also close the the Volkl feel. That's why Atomic came out with that Nomad line. At your size, 165-168cm is where you should be looking for what you want to do.

You do know you need good boots too ?

I keep posting this link, http://www.skiessentials.com/ I have bought two pairs of skis from them place and a jacket. The first pair of skis was last March, I bought new in the wrapper 2011-2012 skis.

edit, make that 3 pairs of skis from them, just ordered last years Kendo's.

thanks.  they are both the same width underfoot, which is why I was looking to compare those 2.  Since my past skiing days and my old skis were in the old skinny ski era, I am a little leery of going too wide underfoot, worried that it will feel too weird for me.  I do know how important boots are.  Thanks for that site!  definitely one to check regularly for a good deal.

post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfdog View Post
 

I own the RTM 81's and it will do the kind of turns you are asking for.  Excellent on ice and steeps.  Best frontside carver I have ever had.  Not as versatile in crud, but I have not skied the Nomad.  The waist widths for both the Nomad and 81'S are 81 mm. 

 

You might want to consider the RTM 84, which is a bit wider and a better crud ski.  Regarded as a great ski.  Been around longer than the 81's, so perhaps more available used.

 

Thanks, very helpful.  I seem to be seeing a lot of good reports on the RTM 81.  To be honest I'm a little torn and maybe a bit confused about what to think about widths, since my experience is from the days of skinny skis.   I was thinking about the next width up for each of these, which would be the RTM 84 (84mm) and the Nomad Crimson TI (86mm), but I'm wondering if the width would make it harder to get edge to edge for quick turns.  Does anyone have any thoughts on that and/or the RTM 84 v the Nomad Crimson TI?

post #6 of 27
IMHO, the RTM 81 will be a very good hard snow ski for you. Sure, you could go a bit wider to help with 'crud' as others say, but honestly, an 81 width ski that's as stout as the RTM will be absolutely fine for anyone with a nominal skill set in your part of the world.
post #7 of 27

Nobody else has said it yet, so I guess I will:  you should search the site for discussion of both these skis (and possibly others, like the RTM 84 and the Crimson).  Either the forum search function or google will work.  For example, try the search string "blackeye ti site:epicski.com" in google.  You'll find comments by people with years and years of experience of a very wide range of skis.

 

One thing several people (including me) have observed about the blackeye is that it's a little slow to engage in a new turn.  Just to be clear:  I own the blackeye and like it, for what it is.  What it's not, is an aggressive frontside carver for hard snow.  I know somebody who skis the RTM 80, and likes it, says as long as you keep it on edge it's fine (full rocker makes it squirrely skied flat), but it really prefers to go fast.

 

But seriously:  look around.  There's a lot of prior discussion of those skis.

post #8 of 27

Both of those skis are pretty burley but comparable. I would go with the RTM 84 personally... easy on edge, great edge grip, yet versatile for an 84 mm ski. I would take a look at the Volkl Kendo and Experience 88. Both are arguably more versatile than the two skis that you mentioned

post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seuss View Post
 

thanks.  they are both the same width underfoot, which is why I was looking to compare those 2.  Since my past skiing days and my old skis were in the old skinny ski era, I am a little leery of going too wide underfoot, worried that it will feel too weird for me.  I do know how important boots are.  Thanks for that site!  definitely one to check regularly for a good deal.

Once your on a 80+ waist ski you will join the rest of us who have no use for anything less. 

 

My Kendo's are tuned a 1/3 sharp tip to tail. With great fitting boots, I think turn and the tip engages. My buddy on his Mantra's tunes at .5/3, these are our everyday ski at Okemo.

 

The Blackeye may be better tuned at 1/3 tip to tail.

 

Last Sunday the snow was soft like Springtime, it didn't freeze overnight. I was able to drop my hip in the turn and feel the skis come around. If you can ski well a wide ski is awesome. Gives great performance in a large variety of conditions. 

post #10 of 27

Another vote for the RTM 81 though I have no experience on the Atomics, but I do own the 81's, live in Cleveland.  These are my go to all mountain fun skis.  Really like them  Going to Holiday Valley this weekend to get my first turns in.

 

Good Luck,

 

Rick

post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

Another vote for the RTM 81 though I have no experience on the Atomics, but I do own the 81's, live in Cleveland.  These are my go to all mountain fun skis.  Really like them  Going to Holiday Valley this weekend to get my first turns in.

Good Luck,

Rick

Great, thanks! How are they with quick short turns and in moguls? One thing about the volkls is that they seem to have a wide turn radius compared to comparable skis, generally (and v. the Atomics). Turn radius was not a spec that was advertised back in my day that I can remember, so not sure how much weight to give it when comparing skis.
post #12 of 27

Very good at short turns - come around quickly and the tip rocker along with the profile initiates the turns seamlessly.  Respectable in the moguls, although it has a stiff tail.  I have found the ski to be quite versatile in turn shape, it does them all well.  And it skis slowly well, something that I, as an instructor, particularly find useful. 

 

I ski the 171, which is rated at a turn radius of 17.4.  But (to me) it feels like it turns quicker than that.

 

What I will also say about the ski is that it rewards good technique generously.  It won't spank your failings in technique, just give you a kind of "meh..." response.  Like all Volkls, it gives you a good feel for the snow and your edges. 

 

You can get on some steep and icy terrain and put the hammer down with some long radius turns, and it will not fail you. 

post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfdog View Post
 

Very good at short turns - come around quickly and the tip rocker along with the profile initiates the turns seamlessly.  Respectable in the moguls, although it has a stiff tail.  I have found the ski to be quite versatile in turn shape, it does them all well.  And it skis slowly well, something that I, as an instructor, particularly find useful.

 

I ski the 171, which is rated at a turn radius of 17.4.  But (to me) it feels like it turns quicker than that.

 

What I will also say about the ski is that it rewards good technique generously.  It won't spank your failings in technique, just give you a kind of "meh..." response.  Like all Volkls, it gives you a good feel for the snow and your edges.

 

You can get on some steep and icy terrain and put the hammer down with some long radius turns, and it will not fail you.

I agree.  The way the ski works in bumps is one of the characteristics I like most about the RTM 81's.  I love skiing bumps even as I turn a new decade tomorrow!  (No it isn't the decade that begins with a 3, 4 or 5, but thankfully not 7)  When I buy a new ski, bumps is one of the first places I take it to see what she can do.

 

To the OP, You will love the 81's around here and will even like them in occasional jaunts out west if you don't have a dedicated pair for that.

 

Rick G


Edited by rickg - 1/11/15 at 1:59pm
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfdog View Post
 

Very good at short turns - come around quickly and the tip rocker along with the profile initiates the turns seamlessly.  Respectable in the moguls, although it has a stiff tail.  I have found the ski to be quite versatile in turn shape, it does them all well.  And it skis slowly well, something that I, as an instructor, particularly find useful. 

 

I ski the 171, which is rated at a turn radius of 17.4.  But (to me) it feels like it turns quicker than that.

 

What I will also say about the ski is that it rewards good technique generously.  It won't spank your failings in technique, just give you a kind of "meh..." response.  Like all Volkls, it gives you a good feel for the snow and your edges. 

 

You can get on some steep and icy terrain and put the hammer down with some long radius turns, and it will not fail you. 

Thanks!  I'm leaning more and more to the RTM 81.  Spent some time talking to a salesperson at a local shop who said nothing but good things.   He said the 84s were good too, and tried to tell me not to worry about the width, since they are not at all wide by today' standards, etc.  He was my age and I explained my history, and my 20 year gap in skis, etc.  He was great.   I still think for my fist pair back I'd prefer the 81s.  Especially since I'll be spending most of my time herding my kids around the groomers.

 

The feedback in this thread (and in others I've found searching) has been really helpful!   I'm also nearly over my instinctive doubts about the full rocker, since it seems the 81s do well on the ice and hardpack.  I've seen other threads where folks say it is not an issue and the skis don't chatter much and feel much like a cambered ski - maybe the rocker is more subtle than some?

post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 

I agree.  The way the ski works in bumps is one of the characteristics I like most about the RTM 81's.  I love skiing bumps even as I turn a new decade tomorrow!  (No it isn't the decade that begins with a 3, 4 or 5, but thankfully not 7)  When I buy a new ski, bumps is one of the first places I take it to see what she can do.

 

To the OP, You will love the 81's around here and will even like them in occasional jaunts out west if you don't have a dedicated pair for that)

 

Rick G

Thanks Rick.  Looks like your experiences are going to a great guide, since you are in Cleveland like me, so see the same conditions as I will be seeing, as far as places reachable by car.  How is Holiday Valley?  Did you get out on your 81s there this past weekend like you mentioned a few posts up?  The only place I've been locally is a few nights at Boston Mills during my kids' ski club there last year on the rentals they offered.   Looking forward to getting some good skis and hitting a better place.

post #16 of 27

Suess,

 

Yes I got to Holiday over the weekend.  My RTM 81's ROCK!  Had a blast in some softer spring like conditions.  I varied my runs alternating between high speed carves and some traditional fall line skiing along the slope sides,  and a few runs doing both.  The RTM's easily transition between the two styles.  Last year for many reasons (mostly because I own too many skis) I only got a chance to ski these 3 or 4 times, not enough to really get to know the ski.  Starting out this past weekend it was kind of like being on a brand new pair again.  Every run I seem to like them better as I discover how far I can lay them over or how quick I can transition to the next turn.

 

As for skiing around Cleveland, you basically have 2 choices, ski the little resorts around here, Boston & Alpine and get bored silly or suck it up and drive east to Western NY.  Peak N Peak is a decent choice as it is only 90-100 miles.  I can have fun there for a single day by practicing form and hopefully finding some bumps.  Peak gets good snow and Lake Effect so conditions are usually pretty good but it is only a 400, hill.  I wouldn't spend an entire weekend there, but if time is short or if I don't want to take the extra hour to get to Holiday, I go to Peak.  But if I have the time and I want to spend a weekend, HV is the place to go.  About a 3 hour drive, they have a 750' vertical and the slopes are spread out over 4 areas and 3 lodges.  Great variety and some decent challenge especially if the Wall is open.  And then there is the town of Ellicottville, which has been called the Aspen of the East.  It is a real ski town with at least 4 ski shops, B&B's, restaurants, shops etc.  Great place to spend a long weekend.  Plus if you are there midweek, you get the option to ski Holimont which overlooks town.  Holimont is a private ski mountain (think exclusive golf club) that opens its slopes to non-members during the week.  It is another 750' hill with excellent grooming (unlike HV, one of their only knocks) and views of the town from the top.

 

Those 2 resorts right next to each other plus the town makes HV the preferred weekend destination for NE Ohio.  However another quality option at about the same distance is Seven Springs in Western PA about 60 miles east of Pittsburgh, just off the PA Turnpike.  That is where I cut my teeth so to speak as I grew up in Pgh.  The skiing is on par with HV but it is a destination resort where you don't leave once you are there.  Great amenities all at the resort with no need to drive anywhere if you are staying right there.

 

Finally there are lots of ski clubs in the Cleveland area that will help you get to the mountain by offering bus trips and weeklong trips out west, New England and even Europe.  Check out http://skicleveland.com/.  I am active in Hi Rise which is on the east side.  Other clubs all around the area.

 

From one transplant to another, Welcome!

 

Rick G

 

BTW  not sure which shop in the area you stopped at, but I do work P/T at Little Mountain in  Mentor.  I am there most Monday evenings.  Stop by to say hello!

post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 

So I pulled the trigger and got the RTM 81.   The hard part now will be the waiting until I get to use them (most likely January, when the kids' ski club starts up).   Will report back after I've been out on them.

 

Thanks all!

post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 

So I finally got out on the new RTM 81s for the first time Friday night.  Must say I'm both relieved and also very excited!!   BEWARE: longish post follows.  Feel free to bail out now.

 

I was having buyer's doubts, since I bought without the chance to demo at all.  I started fearing that I should have gone with the cambered Atomics, especially since Atomic has long been my favorite brand, all my prior skis in “the old days” had been cambered, and I was worried that the "full rocker" of the RTM would have my tips and tails flapping/chattering a bit on the hardpack (my most common terrain) and leave me sorry that I bought the RTMs.  If I hadn't gotten a great deal on the RTMs or if the Blackeye TI came in a 170 then I would have got the Atomics.  But I wanted as close to a 170 as possible and the Blackeye TI comes in 167 or 174, while the RTM 81 has a 171, so that plus the deal I got tipped the scale on my purchase.

 

Fears disappeared with the first run on the bunny hill with my 7 year old.  Skis kept good contact with the surface all along their length when running flat.  No hint of gapping or flapping.  Turns initiated almost effortlessly, even a low speeds.  So biggest fears were unfounded.  Got them on some slightly steeper terrain and the speed didn’t affect the ride at all.  Still very stable.   Got them on edge and they really responded.  Able to carve nice tight turns as well as great sweeping wide turns and everything in between.  Quick edge to edge.  I recall my old straight slalom skis complained and vibrated a bit on long turns at high speeds (due to the softer flex), but the RTMs are stiff and stable, with a very formidable sidewall, that made riding out those long edge sweeps feel like riding on a rail.  But they were still able to make the slalom-type turns that I love, so it is a great balance.

 

I was skiing at night, temp in the low single digits – not much soft snow - and the grip and control were great.  Never doubted.   I spent almost the entire evening sheparding my 7 year old around, so couldn’t put them on anything really steep or demanding, but I tried to put them thru what paces I could on what I was skiing, and am nothing but excited to push them harder.  I’m sure they will be up to the task based on this first night.  Could not be more relieved and pleased.  :D

 

One note on the “full rocker”.  As someone returning to skiing from the old straight ski era I was very leery, but my 81s are basically neutral their entire length.  Putting them base-to-base they touch just about the entire way.  If anything, there is almost a slight hint of camber.  There is the slightest of separation toward the very tips and tails – at the very ends, but I’m talking very slight.  Maybe the width of a few pieces of paper.  Nothing at all like what you see at the tips and tails of the new Nordica Enforcer that you can see in the preview thread in this forum (http://www.epicski.com/t/131547/preview-2016-nordica-enforcer-its-back ).

 

Anyway, sorry for the rambling, but I’m really excited, and also wanted to provide some detail and thoughts based on my experience on “new” skis after a long break, since there have been a number of posts by folks like me returning to skiing after a long break. 

post #19 of 27

Seuss, glad you like the RTM's.  They really are a fun ski for around the Mid Atlantic area.  I have had the chance to ski mine a couple of times since my last post and they are starting to move up the ranks of my all time favorite ski list.  As you already discovered, the "full rocker" stamped on the ski is purely marketing as it is not what you would really call "full rocker"  It is really a non camber ski with early rise tip and tail, a very slight and gradual early rise.  When running flat they feel like maybe a 160 but the slightest tip on edge you get the whole 171 running length and you can just rail.   For a non cambered ski they actually respond fairly well to my old school style.  I think that is what makes it perform well in the bumps.

 

Hope to run into you at one of the local hills.

 

Rick G

post #20 of 27
I have just gotten back to skiing after a 20 yr hiatus too. I bought a non Ti version of Blackeye and not too keen on them, definitely too soft for my weight (240lbs) and while my technique is suspect I don't think they like short turns or ice. I have since read a few reviews and some say they are more a ski for longer arcs, don't know much about RTM but given your preferences & my limited experience with Blackeye they would not have been the right ski for you.
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiatus View Post

I have just gotten back to skiing after a 20 yr hiatus too. I bought a non Ti version of Blackeye and not too keen on them, definitely too soft for my weight (240lbs) and while my technique is suspect I don't think they like short turns or ice. I have since read a few reviews and some say they are more a ski for longer arcs, don't know much about RTM but given your preferences & my limited experience with Blackeye they would not have been the right ski for you.

It's exciting to get back to skiing, isn't it?!   :)

 

Sorry the non-TI blackeye doesn't appear to be living up to your expectations.  I looked them up quickly and they are a soft ski, so at your weight, I can see where you might want something a bit stiffer.  The TI version is stiffer (didn't look to see what else about its construction is different).  

 

That said, I strongly suspect that you may be onto something with your comment about your technique.  Both the normal blackeye you have and the blackeye TI have about the shortest turn radius you'll find in a recreational ski, so short turns are in their DNA.  That, coupled with the softness of the version you have should make them very easy to make short turns.   If you are not able to get the quick short turns you want, its probably your technique.   Best to work on your technique a bit and maybe take a refresher lesson or two until you get those babies turning like they are made to do.  Then you will have a good base line to start comparing/demoing stiffer skis, if you still want to go stiffer at that point.  But get your technique sorted out before you look for stiffer skis, as you are already at about the shortest turn radius skis you will find, and stiffer at this point will only make it incrementally harder for you, turn-wise, I would think.  

 

Welcome back to the slopes and have fun!

post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks Rick.   

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 

Seuss, glad you like the RTM's.  They really are a fun ski for around the Mid Atlantic area.  I have had the chance to ski mine a couple of times since my last post and they are starting to move up the ranks of my all time favorite ski list.  As you already discovered, the "full rocker" stamped on the ski is purely marketing as it is not what you would really call "full rocker"  It is really a non camber ski with early rise tip and tail, a very slight and gradual early rise.  When running flat they feel like maybe a 160 but the slightest tip on edge you get the whole 171 running length and you can just rail.   For a non cambered ski they actually respond fairly well to my old school style.  I think that is what makes it perform well in the bumps.

 

Hope to run into you at one of the local hills.

 

Rick G

 

Thanks Rick.  Psyched to be back in the game.  I recall you said you work at Little Mountain.  I'm a west-sider, but my kids have soccer games (both indoor and outdoor) out at Lost Nation fairly often, so perhaps I'll stop by sometime while I'm out that way.  Never been to that shop.  Would be on a weekend though.  

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seuss View Post
 

Thanks Rick.  

 

Thanks Rick.  Psyched to be back in the game.  I recall you said you work at Little Mountain.  I'm a west-sider, but my kids have soccer games (both indoor and outdoor) out at Lost Nation fairly often, so perhaps I'll stop by sometime while I'm out that way.  Never been to that shop.  Would be on a weekend though.

 

You are welcome!

 

I only work at the shop on Monday nights now that I have a real 9-5 job again.  Most weekends I am racing.  Occasionally I wake up too sick for work and call off but miraculously get better in time to head to the Peak or HV.  :D  Let me know if you can sneak away during the week.  I usually need a week's notice to arrange.

 

Rick

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seuss View Post

It's exciting to get back to skiing, isn't it?!   smile.gif

That said, I strongly suspect that you may be onto something with your comment about your technique.  Both the normal blackeye you have and the blackeye TI have about the shortest turn radius you'll find in a recreational ski, so short turns are in their DNA.

It's great to get back to skiing, felt as good as getting back into cycling.

Most reviews I have seen on the Nomad blackeye suggest its more of a mid to long turn ski so surprised you think of them as a short turn ski ... Here is one such review by YG team, the two reviewers that commented on the turn radius both said that it prefers long turns - BTW both versions share the same cuts.

http://yellowgentian.com/ski-reviews/all-mountain/atomic-nomad-blackeye-ti-arc#dellasausa-s-review-advanced-all-mountain-skier
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiatus View Post


It's great to get back to skiing, felt as good as getting back into cycling.

Most reviews I have seen on the Nomad blackeye suggest its more of a mid to long turn ski so surprised you think of them as a short turn ski ... Here is one such review by YG team, the two reviewers that commented on the turn radius both said that it prefers long turns - BTW both versions share the same cuts.

http://yellowgentian.com/ski-reviews/all-mountain/atomic-nomad-blackeye-ti-arc#dellasausa-s-review-advanced-all-mountain-skier

Interesting.  They have a short turn radius and I recall most of the descriptions and reviews I had seen mentioned their ability for short turns.  The non-TI version is fairly soft/flexible, so that coupled with a short radius should give you a ski that is good for short turns.   Its always possible that they may just not be a good match for you.    There is a lot of praise for bonafides around here and then the occasional person who hated them.  

 

Best of luck! 

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seuss View Post

It's exciting to get back to skiing, isn't it?!   smile.gif

Sorry the non-TI blackeye doesn't appear to be living up to your expectations.  I looked them up quickly and they are a soft ski, so at your weight, I can see where you might want something a bit stiffer.  The TI version is stiffer (didn't look to see what else about its construction is different).  

That said, I strongly suspect that you may be onto something with your comment about your technique.  Both the normal blackeye you have and the blackeye TI have about the shortest turn radius you'll find in a recreational ski, so short turns are in their DNA.  That, coupled with the softness of the version you have should make them very easy to make short turns.   If you are not able to get the quick short turns you want, its probably your technique.   Best to work on your technique a bit and maybe take a refresher lesson or two until you get those babies turning like they are made to do.  Then you will have a good base line to start comparing/demoing stiffer skis, if you still want to go stiffer at that point.  But get your technique sorted out before you look for stiffer skis, as you are already at about the shortest turn radius skis you will find, and stiffer at this point will only make it incrementally harder for you, turn-wise, I would think.  

Welcome back to the slopes and have fun!
Is this a serious post, or a troll post?
post #27 of 27
Rtm 81 had 100 days on them last year. I am 72 years old. Believe me I can flex these boards. If you can lay these over and carve them as in start your turn on the traverse and finish on the traverse they are the best carving skis ever made. Most skiers won't do this an skid into the turn or unweight and slide. These boards cost plenty, the turn is built into them and with tip and tail rocker it is easy to start the turn
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Volkl RTM 81 v. Atomic Blackeye Nomad TI