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Any of you old people ever taken a lesson in the terrain park?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have little interest in skiing in the park. Im too old and would look stupid i think. 

 

But i was wondering if taking some sort of intro to terrain park lesson might be beneficial? I had an instructor last year that took his group through some easy features of the park at the end of the lesson on the way down, kind of fun. 

 

I would like to learn how to jump off small features with out wiping out, etc...Seems like learning some basic park skills could really be beneficial to free skiing.

post #2 of 11

The skiers code in the park is interpreted a little differently, especially with regard to landing zones (avoiding them unless actually using it to land0.  Snaking lines of others approaching the same jump is also frowned upon.  Regardless, I taught some basic freestyle lessons awhile ago and the main things I stressed with learning to jump was keeping the hands forward and pushing the shins against the boot tongues when popping off the jump.. and gotta be aggressive.  Be confident and not timid when pushing up and out as you leave the jump.  If you try to soak it up you are likely to land back seat.. remember the landing is going to be pitched down and the ramp going off is pitched up so you have to adjust for that.

 

@TheRusty is pretty solid in basic park feature instruction currently.  He works at Whitetail. I'm way out of date and hardly do much in the park at all these days.  Landing anything "fun" for me sometimes causes some pain, even  injuries, even when I land it what seems like pretty perfectly.  Old back and joints just don't have the elasticity that they used to...  But, if we hook up again this season I'd be happy to take you and maybe my kid in to the park and mess around on a little jump there a couple times.

post #3 of 11

I teach in the park a bit, just basic stuff mostly.  I stress ATML and edicate (smart style).  The kids love it, but I like to run adults through sometimes if they are adventurous, mostly on the way down at the end of the day or in the Stash Parks mid mountain.  I got the PSIA merit badge for Freestyle, but I am not a very accomplished park rat.  There are good things to learn in the park and the pipe can also be a lot of fun.  I like the pipe best on teley gear.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

The skiers code in the park is interpreted a little differently, especially with regard to landing zones (avoiding them unless actually using it to land0.  Snaking lines of others approaching the same jump is also frowned upon.  Regardless, I taught some basic freestyle lessons awhile ago and the main things I stressed with learning to jump was keeping the hands forward and pushing the shins against the boot tongues when popping off the jump.. and gotta be aggressive.  Be confident and not timid when pushing up and out as you leave the jump.  If you try to soak it up you are likely to land back seat.. remember the landing is going to be pitched down and the ramp going off is pitched up so you have to adjust for that.

 

@TheRusty is pretty solid in basic park feature instruction currently.  He works at Whitetail. I'm way out of date and hardly do much in the park at all these days.  Landing anything "fun" for me sometimes causes some pain, even  injuries, even when I land it what seems like pretty perfectly.  Old back and joints just don't have the elasticity that they used to...  But, if we hook up again this season I'd be happy to take you and maybe my kid in to the park and mess around on a little jump there a couple times.

cool. ill let you know when/if i head up ... 

post #5 of 11

Being a (cough) geezer, I really enjoyed the early days when we could take regular group lessons into the park (now we have special terrain park lessons). I especially enjoyed it when I had a mixed group of parents and kids because inevitably there would be a parent who was just going to watch who would end up going bigger than my demos after they saw how easy it was (uh, I thought you said you weren't going to do any jumping??????). I guess fun is irresistible?

 

It sounds like you've already had an intro to the park. Now you're ready for step 2. Go for it! A good instructor will have a step by step progression for helping you break down and plan out the pieces of jumps. The first step is learning about ATML (approach, take-off, maneuver and landing).

 

Before we had terrain parks, we had natural snow features. They are still out there. After some learning and practice in the park you'll have a whole new eye for finding these features in "the wild".

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

 

 

Before we had terrain parks, we had natural snow features. They are still out there. After some learning and practice in the park you'll have a whole new eye for finding these features in "the wild".

 

this is what im talking about...Thumbs Up

post #7 of 11

I usually only venture into the park to do some jumps, and only when there is no line up.   Sometimes, at some hills after a storm, I go into the park and ski the powder between the features; it's the only place that still has powder after all the other runs are packed down.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Stumbled on to this...it's old but found it funny.

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2009/feb/15/skiing-colorado-freestyle-speak

"Like most people born before 1975, I have never tried freestyle and would feel as uncomfortable hanging about a park as at the entrance to a kindergarten. Deep down, I'd always thought it looked fun, but feared that if I tried to join in with the jibbers, with their baggy trousers and special language, I'd look as ridiculous as my dad doing the twist at a wedding. I'd reluctantly resigned myself to the fact that old men don't jump."
post #9 of 11

I use many of the "snow" features & some of the plastic stuff for both myself & students.  Sometimes I need to be creative with some of the big features (which can piss off the park crew), but I gotta do what I gotta do ;) .  Wish we had way more rollers, banked turns, small table tops & 1/4 pipe type stuff.  I am hoping that the current popularization of "Terrain Based Learning" moves beyond the beginner slopes & leads to more Skier/boarder cross type slope designs for the public.  Large machine made moguls can be great for learning the real thing, & mucho fun by themselves. The proper designs can be safe & fun for everyone!

:D

post #10 of 11

When I started snowboarding many years ago people asked me when I was going to start hitting the park. My response was "l don't ski that way, why do you think I would board that way?". True a park is just snow making wales and gullies turned up a notch, but I am way more into finding features as I go, then hiking the same trail over and over.  Many years later I started to tele and spent lots of the level 2 exam in the half pipe, it was a blast. I still don't jump (I hate splatting) or grind (I like my gear) or hike the same feature endlessly (because I'm lazy) but the park is a fun introduction to skiing in more dimensions.

 

By all means take a lesson. Learning park etiquette and what the features are for is a great place to start, as well as learning things like why park people hate people who go off the sides of hits or ramps instead of over them. If you have a good park designer there will be more then big hits. Spines are a fantastic way to improve your bump skiing. Half/quarter pipes show how to make the transition from flat to vertical to flat again. Banks are all around good fun. Easy style it, just ski through the park slowly to the side a couple of times and check out what looks like it might be fun. Well you're there may notice that lots of people are taking spills such that one more won't look stupid.  

post #11 of 11

I am a former park rat. Probably one of the few active here on Epic. I'll say that the OP is right, the park is a young man's game. At my advanced age (34), my body doesn't like the repeated abuse that I subjected it to in the park when i was 24. However, the OP asked the question is there anything to be gained skill wise from taking some park lessons. I'd say absolutely. A kicker is an excellent way to learn a centered stance and good fore/aft balance. If you don't have either, you'll find out very quickly once you leave the lip of that feature. Rotational skills abound, between spinning in the air, on the ground, and on boxes. Managing pressure is the name of the game when it comes to buttering. And there is no quicker way to find out how your edge control is than trying to slide a rail. 

 

So yeah, there are lessons to be learned in the park, even if the park isn't your goal. 

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